Archive for the ‘Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day’ Category

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day – July 2017

The Side Garden July 2017 [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Happy Bloom Day, all! So far, this summer has been a winner here in southeastern PA, with a nice amount of rain every few days. That means lots of mowing and weeding, of course, but no time wasted on watering, so there’s been time for some summer projects as well. More on that later; for now, let’s start with portraits of highlights from the last few weeks, beginning with some annuals.

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Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day – June 2017

No excuses this month! There are plenty of blooms to show for this Bloom Day. In fact, it looks like we’re right where we should be compared to other years, even with the cool, cloudy, and rainy weather we’ve enjoyed over the last month. Just last week, we were still having nights in the low 40s and days in the 60s; a few days ago, we jumped to the 90s. That’s not so good for the gardener but very good for the garden–at least for the basil, squash, beans, cotton, and other heat-loving plants.

There’s so much good stuff going on that I limited my photo selections to just the past 2 weeks, and I left out several things I’d planned on mentioning. But there is still lots to show, so let’s get to it.

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Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day – May 2017

The front garden in mid-May [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

So…Bloom Day, right? Then where are the flowers? Thanks to the relatively cool temperatures we’ve had over the last month, they’re taking their sweet time showing up. That’s not to say there aren’t any, just not many.

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Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day – April 2017

The aptly named spring beauty (Claytonia virginica) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

The aptly named spring beauty (Claytonia virginica)

As I’ve mentioned a few (dozen) times before, Hayefield isn’t really a spring garden, so pulling together a Bloom Day post at this time of year isn’t quite as easy as at other times. I did manage to find some blooms, though, and I have some other topics to cover as well, so perhaps you will find something of interest today. Continue reading

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day – October 2016

The Front Garden at Hayefield - October 2016

Yes, FINALLY, we did get some rain: a few blessed inches at the end of September. We’re still about 8 inches behind for the year, and it doesn’t look like there will be more soaking rain for a while, but it was better than nothing. It was enough, at least, to freshen things up a bit over the past few weeks. Continue reading

No-Bloom Day – September 2016

Sadly, the extremely dry conditions we endured all summer have continued, with less than 1 inch of scattered precipitation over the past month, and the garden is suffering. There are a few stalwarts in flower now, including golden lace (Patrinia scabiosifolia), goldenrods (Solidago), narrow-leaved ironweed (Vernonia lettermannii), purple Japanese burnet (Sanguisorba tenuifolia ‘Purpurea’), and Japanese bush clover (Lespedeza thunbergii). The plants all look tired and droopy, though, and despite my best efforts, I just couldn’t get any images that were worthy of taking up your time to view. So, I offer my apologies for this month, with hopes that maybe I’ll have something for October, and encourage you to admire the efforts of the other participants in this month’s main Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day post at May Dreams Gardens.

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day – August 2016

Tufted hair grass (Deschampsia cespitosa) and clematis arbor in the side garden at Hayefield [Nancy J. Ondra]

Despite chirpy assurances from area weather reporters that “everyone” in our region has repeatedly gotten soaking rains over the past month, a few of us, at least, have not shared in the bounty. Barely 1 inch of rain over the last 4 weeks, combined with an unusually dry June and July and long stretches of brutally hot weather, does not make for joyous gardening. To be honest, I was [this] close to simply skipping Bloom Day this month. Then this little guy changed my mind. Continue reading