Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day – September 2017

Overview of the side garden at Hayefield - September 2017 [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

I don’t like to use the word “disappointed” in relation to the garden, particularly at this time of year. I’d hoped to be immersed in aster season by now, though, and while the plants are filled with buds, it’ll take a few more days of sunshine to really move them along.

That means the garden doesn’t look much different than last month. It’s colorful, but not spectacular. The side garden is still showing the most action, as evident in the overview shot at the top and the two images below.

The side garden at Hayefield - September 2017 [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

The side garden at Hayefield – September 2017

The side garden at Hayefield - September 2017 [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

The side garden at Hayefield – September 2017

The middle path in the front garden is usually my favorite spot this time of year, but this year, the outer path is the winner.

The front garden at Hayefield - September 2017 [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

The front garden at Hayefield – September 2017

Rather than show more repetitive garden shots, I decided to focus this Bloom Day mostly on plants I haven’t shown yet this year, just to keep things interesting. I also have some news to announce at the end that some of you will probably be happy to hear. For now, the key players this September, starting with the annuals…

Leavenworth's eryngo (Eryngium leavenworthii) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Leavenworth’s eryngo (Eryngium leavenworthii)

'Firefly' cuphea (Cuphea) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Firefly’ cuphea (Cuphea)

Honeywort (Cerinthe major var. purpurascens) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Honeywort (Cerinthe major var. purpurascens)

South African foxglove (Ceratotheca triloba) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

South African foxglove (Ceratotheca triloba)

White South African foxglove (Ceratotheca triloba 'Alba') [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

White South African foxglove (Ceratotheca triloba ‘Alba’)

'African Blue' basil (Ocimum) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘African Blue’ basil (Ocimum)

'Neon' pot marigold (Calendula officinalis) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Neon’ pot marigold (Calendula officinalis)

'Irish Poet' tassel flower (Emilia javanica) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Irish Poet’ tassel flower (Emilia javanica)

'Limelight' four o'clock (Mirabilis jalapa) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Limelight’ four o’clock (Mirabilis jalapa)

'Kingwood Gold' jewels of Opar (Talinum paniculatum) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Kingwood Gold’ jewels of Opar (Talinum paniculatum)

Flower-of-an-hour (Hibiscus trionum) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Flower-of-an-hour (Hibiscus trionum)

Red mallow (Pavonia missionum) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Red mallow (Pavonia missionum)

'Sensation' tuberose (Polianthes tuberosa) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Sensation’ tuberose (Polianthes tuberosa)

Black-leaved cotton (Gossypium herbaceum 'Nigrum') [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Black-leaved cotton (Gossypium herbaceum ‘Nigrum’)

Black-leaved cotton (Gossypium herbaceum 'Nigrum') - finally starting to produce seed! [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Black-leaved cotton (Gossypium herbaceum ‘Nigrum’) – finally starting to produce seed!

An unexpected visitor guarding the cotton ripening in the greenhouse [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

An unexpected visitor guarding the cotton ripening in the greenhouse

Some of the annual vines are looking good too.

I've grown Tangier pea (Lathyrus tingitanus) for several years and never been too impressed - until this year. Instead of fizzling out in July, it stayed alive, then really took off in the last few weeks. Maybe it was all the rain, or maybe it's this new spot, where it gets morning and late afternoon sun and bright shade through the hottest part of the day. [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

I’ve grown Tangier pea (Lathyrus tingitanus) for several years and never been too impressed – until this year. Instead of fizzling out in July, it stayed alive, then really took off in the last few weeks. Maybe it was all the rain, or maybe it’s this new spot, where it gets morning and late afternoon sun and bright shade through the hottest part of the day.

Tangier pea (Lathyrus tingitanus) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Tangier pea (Lathyrus tingitanus)

'Flying Saucers' morning glory (Ipomoea tricolor) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Flying Saucers’ morning glory (Ipomoea tricolor)

Hyacinth bean (Lablab purpureus [Dolichos lablab]) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Hyacinth bean (Lablab purpureus [Dolichos lablab])

White hyacinth bean (Lablab purpureus 'Alba') [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

White hyacinth bean (Lablab purpureus ‘Alba’)

Some of the colchicums started to emerge and open this week.

'Rosy Dawn' autumn crocus (Colchicum) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Rosy Dawn’ autumn crocus (Colchicum)

 'Nancy Lindsay' autumn crocus (Colchicum autumnale) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Nancy Lindsay’ autumn crocus (Colchicum autumnale)

White autumn crocus (Colchicum autumnale 'Album') [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

White autumn crocus (Colchicum autumnale ‘Album’)

The burnets (Sanguisorba) have been looking good for a few weeks now.

Japanese bottlebrush (Sanguisorba obtusa) - my least favorite burnet - had its main bloom show in June and July, but it's still sending up a few new stalks. [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Japanese bottlebrush (Sanguisorba obtusa) – my least favorite burnet – had its main bloom show in June and July, but it’s still sending up a few new stalks.

White Japanese burnet (Sanguisorba tenuifolia 'Alba') was at its best around late August, but some still looks good now. It pairs well with 'Morning Light' miscanthus (Miscanthus). The grass is a good match height-wise, provides some support for the burnet stems, and creates a color echo with the thin white edge on its blades. [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

White Japanese burnet (Sanguisorba tenuifolia ‘Alba’) was at its best around late August, but some still looks good now. It pairs well with ‘Morning Light’ miscanthus (Miscanthus). The grass is a good match height-wise, provides some support for the burnet stems, and creates a color echo with the thin white edge on its blades.

Over the last few years, several pink-flowered clumps of Japanese burnet (Sanguisorba tenuifolia) have popped up in the garden, close to 'Alba' but also not far from 'Purpurea'. I suppose they are 'Rosea'. [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Over the last few years, several pink-flowered clumps of Japanese burnet (Sanguisorba tenuifolia) have popped up in the garden, close to ‘Alba’ but also not far from ‘Purpurea’. I suppose they are ‘Rosea’.

Purple Japanese burnet (Sanguisorba tenuifolia 'Purpurea') starts to bloom in late August to early September here. It's my favorite color-wise, but it's starting to produce too many seedlings, so I'm slightly less enthusiastic about it these days. [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Purple Japanese burnet (Sanguisorba tenuifolia ‘Purpurea’) starts to bloom in late August to early September here. It’s my favorite color-wise, but it’s starting to produce too many seedlings, so I’m slightly less enthusiastic about it these days.

I just had to share this one quirky bloom of purple Japanese burnet - or should I say bearnet? - (Sanguisorba tenuifolia 'Purpurea'). [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

I just had to share this one quirky bloom of purple Japanese burnet – or should I say bearnet? – (Sanguisorba tenuifolia ‘Purpurea’).

The New York ironweed (Vernonia noveboracensis), which looked so good last month, is mostly past, but a few clumps started later and are colorful now: rich purple on top with a warm, rust tinge to the foliage (the latter not necessarily being a good thing).

New York ironweed (Vernonia noveboracensis) with fungal rust (apparently Puccinia vernoniae) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

New York ironweed (Vernonia noveboracensis) with fungal rust (apparently Puccinia vernoniae)

Rust on upper surface of New York ironweed (Vernonia noveboracensis) leaf [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Rust on upper surface of New York ironweed (Vernonia noveboracensis) leaf

Rust on underside of New York ironweed (Vernonia noveboracensis) leaf [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Rust on underside of New York ironweed (Vernonia noveboracensis) leaf

‘Iron Butterfly’ narrowleaf ironweed (Vernonia lettermannii) hasn’t opened yet, but the numerous seedlings it has produced over the years have been going for almost two weeks now. This patch in the front garden is particularly interesting…

Narrowleaf ironweed (Vernonia lettermannii) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com])

Narrowleaf ironweed (Vernonia lettermannii)

…because of the color variation: one the usual purple and one more on the pink side.

Color variation on narrowleaf ironweed (Vernonia lettermannii) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com])

Color variation on narrowleaf ironweed (Vernonia lettermannii)

Color variation on narrowleaf ironweed (Vernonia lettermannii) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com])

Color variation on narrowleaf ironweed (Vernonia lettermannii)

Like the asters, the goldenrods (Solidago) are a bit behind, but a few in the meadow are finally coloring up.

Wrinkled-leaf goldenrod (Solidago rugosa) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Wrinkled-leaf goldenrod (Solidago rugosa)

Stiff goldenrod (Solidago rigida [Oligoneuron rigidum]) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Stiff goldenrod (Solidago rigida [Oligoneuron rigidum])

There are plenty of other pretty things making the garden a nice place to be.

'September Charm' Japanese anemone (Anemone x hybrida) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘September Charm’ Japanese anemone (Anemone x hybrida)

'September Charm' Japanese anemone (Anemone x hybrida) with wild quinine (Parthenium integrifolium) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘September Charm’ Japanese anemone (Anemone x hybrida) with wild quinine (Parthenium integrifolium)

'Hot Lips' pink turtlehead (Chelone lyonii) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Hot Lips’ pink turtlehead (Chelone lyonii)

Cut-leaved prairie dock (Silphium terebinthinaceum var. pinnatifidum) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Cut-leaved prairie dock (Silphium terebinthinaceum var. pinnatifidum)

'Cori' hardy ageratum (Conoclinium coelestinum) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Cori’ hardy ageratum (Conoclinium coelestinum)

Cruel plant (Cynanchum ascyrifolium) - I showed this back in June but wanted to remember that it has been in flower all summer. Most reports say that it doesn't set seed, so I was very excited to see that Gardens North does have seed available. I hope it is viable and I can get it to germinate. [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Cruel plant (Cynanchum ascyrifolium) – I showed this back in June but wanted to remember that it has been in flower all summer. Most reports say that it doesn’t set seed, so I was very excited to see that Gardens North does have seed available. I hope it is viable and I can get it to germinate.

A female plant of false hemp (Datisca cannabina) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

A female plant of false hemp (Datisca cannabina)

This was supposed to be a photo of 'Little Joe' Joe-Pye weed (Eutrochium dubium), but I got a bit distracted. [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

This was supposed to be a photo of ‘Little Joe’ Joe-Pye weed (Eutrochium dubium), but I got a bit distracted.

Tall boneset (Eupatorium altissimum) with bitter panicgrass (Panicum amarum) and golden lace (Patrinia scabiosifolia) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Tall boneset (Eupatorium altissimum) with bitter panicgrass (Panicum amarum) and golden lace (Patrinia scabiosifolia)

'Pink Frost' Japanese Joe-Pye weed (Eupatorium fortunei) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Pink Frost’ Japanese Joe-Pye weed (Eupatorium fortunei)

Hyssop-leaved thoroughwort (Eupatorium hyssopifolium) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Hyssop-leaved thoroughwort (Eupatorium hyssopifolium)

'Mariachi Salsa' helenium (Helenium) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Mariachi Salsa’ helenium (Helenium)

'Fire Island' hosta with Japanese blood grass (Imperata cylindrica 'Rubra') [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Fire Island’ hosta with Japanese blood grass (Imperata cylindrica ‘Rubra’)

Seven-son flower (Heptacodium miconioides) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Seven-son flower (Heptacodium miconioides)

Seven-son flower (Heptacodium miconioides) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Seven-son flower (Heptacodium miconioides)

Round-headed bush clover (Lespedeza capitata) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Round-headed bush clover (Lespedeza capitata)

Japanese bush clover (Lespedeza thunbergii) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Japanese bush clover (Lespedeza thunbergii)

Formosa lily (Lilium formosanum) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Formosa lily (Lilium formosanum)

Dwarf fleeceflower (Persicaria affinis) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Dwarf fleeceflower (Persicaria affinis)

Volcano Pink with White Eye phlox (Phlox paniculata 'Barthirtyfive') [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Volcano Pink with White Eye phlox (Phlox paniculata ‘Barthirtyfive’)

Variegated pokeweed (Phytolacca americana 'Variegata' or 'Silberstein') [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Variegated pokeweed (Phytolacca americana ‘Variegata’ or ‘Silberstein’)

White-leaf leather flower (Clematis glaucophylla) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

White-leaf leather flower (Clematis glaucophylla)

Corydalis ochotensis [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Corydalis ochotensis

Corydalis ochotensis likes to scramble up through taller companions. With enough support, it can reach 6 feet or more. [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Corydalis ochotensis likes to scramble up through taller companions. With enough support, it can reach 6 feet or more.

'Axminster Streaked' balloon flower (Platycodon grandiflorus) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Axminster Streaked’ balloon flower (Platycodon grandiflorus)

I get a lot of requests for 'Axminster Streaked' balloon flower (Platycodon grandiflorus), so I sowed a batch of seed this spring in hopes of expanding my collection. Only about 25 percent of the plants produce flowers with showy markings. If you look closely, you can see that I tagged the stems of the best plants for seed-gathering. [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

I get a lot of requests for ‘Axminster Streaked’ balloon flower (Platycodon grandiflorus), so I sowed a batch of seed this spring in hopes of expanding my collection. Only about 25 percent of the plants produce flowers with showy markings. If you look closely, you can see that I tagged the stems of the best plants for seed-gathering.

Here's a curiosity I started from seed two years ago: <em>Flueggea suffruticosa,</em> also known as <em>Securinega suffruticosa</em> or <em>S. ramiflora.</em> It's an uncommon deciduous shrub that's supposed to develop a handsome arching form as it matures. [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Here’s a curiosity I started from seed two years ago: Flueggea suffruticosa, also known as Securinega suffruticosa or S. ramiflora. It’s an uncommon deciduous shrub that’s supposed to develop a handsome arching form as it matures.

Flueggea suffruticosa: male plant in flower [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Flueggea suffruticosa: male plant in flower

Flueggea suffruticosa: male plant in flower [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Flueggea suffruticosa: male plant in flower

'Henry Eilers' sweet coneflower (Rudbeckia subtomentosa) - which had been cut back by about half in June - on the left, with orange coneflower (Rudbeckia fulgida) on the right [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Henry Eilers’ sweet coneflower (Rudbeckia subtomentosa) – which had been cut back by about half in June – on the left, with orange coneflower (Rudbeckia fulgida) on the right

Swamp coneflower (Rudbeckia maxima) seedheads [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Swamp coneflower (Rudbeckia maxima) seedheads

Sedum alboroseum (Hylotelephium erythrostictum) 'Mediovariegatum' [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Sedum alboroseum (Hylotelephium erythrostictum) ‘Mediovariegatum’

Flame grass (Miscanthus 'Purpurascens') [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Flame grass (Miscanthus ‘Purpurascens’)

Bitter panicgrass (Panicum amarum) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Bitter panicgrass (Panicum amarum)

Indian grass (Sorghastrum nutans) - by the acre! [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Indian grass (Sorghastrum nutans) – by the acre!

'Flower Carpet Amber' rose recently produced a few new blooms [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Flower Carpet Amber’ rose recently produced a few new blooms.

The Japanese beetles have been eating any blooms that 'Frau Dagmar' rose dared to produce since July, but the plant was loaded with hips from the flowers that appeared before then. [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

The Japanese beetles have been eating any blooms that ‘Frau Dagmar’ rose dared to produce since July, but the plant was loaded with hips from the flowers that appeared before then.

I removed the seeds from those 'Frau Dagmar' rose hips and dried the fruits, partly in the sun and partly on the lowest setting of my oven. That bowl of whole hips produced a large handful of dried bits. I put them away for winter tea. [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

I removed the seeds from those ‘Frau Dagmar’ rose hips and dried the fruits, partly in the sun and partly on the lowest setting of my oven. That bowl of whole hips produced a large handful of dried bits. I put them away for winter tea.

Speaking of edibles–there are some good things going on back in the veg garden and adjacent areas. I’m particularly excited about some of this year’s beans, many shared with me by a friend in Italy (thanks, Clark!) and not readily available here.

'Merveille de Venise' pole bean (Phaseolus vulgaris): tremendously productive in mid- to late summer [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Merveille de Venise’ pole bean (Phaseolus vulgaris): tremendously productive in mid- to late summer

One of the best things about 'Merveille de Venise' pole bean is that you can pick the pods at a range of sizes, so it's okay if you have to skip harvesting for a day or two. For comparison, I included a few pods of 'Penndragon' at the usual harvest size. [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

One of the best things about ‘Merveille de Venise’ pole bean is that you can pick the pods at a range of sizes, so it’s okay if you have to skip harvesting for a day or two. For comparison, I included a few pods of ‘Penndragon’ at the usual harvest size.

'Stortino di Trento' pole bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Stortino di Trento’ pole bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)

I've been growing pretzel beans (Vigna unguiculata 'Pretzel Bean') for several years now - not for eating but for their decorative value [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

I’ve been growing pretzel beans (Vigna unguiculata ‘Pretzel Bean’) for several years now – not so much for eating as for their decorative value

'Red Noodle' beans are another strain of Vigna unguiculata [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Red Noodle’ beans are another strain of Vigna unguiculata

This one, with 1-foot-long, purple-blushed cream pods, is new for me this year. I'm not sure about the name, but it too looks like some variety of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata). [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

This one, with 1-foot-long, purple-blushed cream pods, is new for me this year. I’m not sure about the name, but it too looks like some variety of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata).

A rather silly-looking 'Mortgage Lifter' tomato [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

A rather silly-looking ‘Mortgage Lifter’ tomato

Tiny currant tomato (Lycopersicon pimpinellifolium) fruits [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Tiny currant tomato (Lycopersicon pimpinellifolium) fruits

'Gold Rush Currant' tomato (Lycopersicon pimpinellifolium) - still loaded with fruit and making more [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Gold Rush Currant’ tomato (Lycopersicon pimpinellifolium) – still loaded with fruit and making more

It was a great year for the Asian pears! [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

It was a great year for the Asian pears!

'Red Treviso' chicory (Cichorium intybus) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Red Treviso’ chicory (Cichorium intybus)

Pipicha (Porophyllum linaria) - a narrow-leaved herb that smells and (apparently) tastes like cilantro [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Pipicha (Porophyllum linaria) – a narrow-leaved herb that smells and (apparently) tastes like cilantro

'Biancoperla' corn (Zea mays) - an Italian heirloom with pearly white kernels used for polenta [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Biancoperla’ corn (Zea mays) – an Italian heirloom with pearly white kernels used for polenta

I made a couple of new acquaintances over the past month. One is this pretty little guy (or girl):

Question mark butterfly (Polygonia interrogationis) - so named for the white markings on the underside of the wings [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Question mark butterfly (Polygonia interrogationis) – so named for the white markings on the underside of the wings

Question mark butterfly (Polygonia interrogationis) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Question mark butterfly (Polygonia interrogationis)

By the way, if you too find yourself trying to put names to butterflies you see, this site has worked well for me for basic butterfly IDs by shape and color: Gardens with Wings. Once you have a basic idea of what your butterfly might be, you may need to look at tiny details to confirm the name. The Massachusetts Butterfly Club has a terrific setup for side-by-side comparisons of butterflies, which is very helpful for folks in the northeast and mid-Atlantic area.

I’ve known this next thing by sight for ages, but it has been so abundant this year that I finally decided to key it out and put a name to the face: American burnweed (Erechtites hieraciifolius). In the woods, it looks like a not-particularly showy wildflower, and sure enough, it’s native to much of the U.S..

American burnweed (Erechtites hieraciifolius) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

American burnweed (Erechtites hieraciifolius)

In the garden, though, this annual can get really big (easily 5 to 6 feet tall) and sows all over. American burnweed is not hard to pull out if the soil is loose, but when there’s a lot of it, it makes for a good bit of work. And at that point, I’m much more inclined to think of it as a weed than a wildflower.

American burnweed (Erechtites hieraciifolius) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

American burnweed (Erechtites hieraciifolius)

American burnweed (Erechtites hieraciifolius) foliage [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

American burnweed (Erechtites hieraciifolius) foliage

American burnweed (Erechtites hieraciifolius) in flower [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

American burnweed (Erechtites hieraciifolius) in flower

American burnweed (Erechtites hieraciifolius) in flower and seed [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

American burnweed (Erechtites hieraciifolius) in flower and seed

I’m sure plenty of you have seen the American burnweed in your own garden, but here’s a face I hope most of you don’t ever see.

Spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula) adult [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula) adult

Native to China, Vietnam, and India, the spotted lanternfly was first identified in the U.S. in 2014, just 30 miles or so from here. Despite quarantine efforts, the adults made it here by last fall. I saw only a few, but that was enough, I guess; this fall, there are many more. If I want to find one, it’s simply a matter of poking around in the silver willow or the grape vines. Spotted lanternflies like to feed on tree-of-heaven (Ailanthus altissima), and it would be great if they stayed there, but they also damage a range of other woody plants.

Spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula) adult on 'Concord' grape (Vitis labrusca) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula) adult on ‘Concord’ grape (Vitis labrusca)

With those distinctive markings, the adults are easy to identify when they’re at rest.

Spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula) adult on golden hoptree (Ptelea trifoliata 'Aurea') [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula) adult on golden hoptree (Ptelea trifoliata ‘Aurea’)

They also have bright red hind wings, which are eye-catching when the insects are flying. If you live in southeastern Pennsylvania and want to know more about the quarantine area and suggested control measures, check out this information page: Spotted Lanternfly Control.

Now, on a happier note…

Ramps (Allium tricoccum) in seed [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Ramps (Allium tricoccum) in seed

I remembered to get up to the woods to check on the ramps patch a few days ago, and sure enough, the seeds were ready for collecting. I didn’t take many, but I do have enough to list a few packets in my Etsy shop for folks who want to start with some very fresh seeds. If any are left over, they’ll appear on my seed-giveaway list this fall. Yes, I’m going to do it again this year! I really regretted not having the time last year, so I’m going to make it work somehow this time. I plan to make my seed list available on November 15, 2017, and the offer will likely be open for only a week. So, if you’re interested in some cool seeds, consider marking your calendar to visit here then, especially if you’re not subscribed to receive notices of new posts.

In the meantime, be sure to check out what’s going on in other fall gardens today. You can find the list of participants in this month’s Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day at Carol’s main post at May Dreams Gardens. Thanks for stopping by!

The Side Garden at Hayefield - September 2017 [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

The Side Garden at Hayefield – September 2017

24 responses to this post.

  1. Posted by Barthelemy Christine on September 15, 2017 at 4:45 am

    Sanguisorba tenuifolia alba with Morning light is a good idea for my garden .
    Have a nice day. Christine

    It’s a simple pairing, but pretty and dependable. Enjoy!
    -Nan

  2. Posted by Nora Sirbaugh on September 15, 2017 at 5:47 am

    Some of the best photos I have seen of the dreaded Spotted Lanternfly…..I’m across the river in NJ and we dread it coming. The ash trees are declining at a terrifying rate from Emerald Ash Borer and feel like the forests are getting hit from all sides.
    Your garden and blog are, as always, a delight. Thanks for sharing.

    Good morning, Nora. I imagine it’ll take just another year or two for the lanternflies to make it out your way. The ash trees here too look really terrible; it’s very sad. At least we still have flowers and seeds to be happy about!
    -Nan

  3. Posted by Sherry Park on September 15, 2017 at 6:25 am

    Oh, what a joy to be greeted by your post in the middle of my nightly romp online ! You have been a very busy lady once again…You know, it has been a very strange year weatherwise,,,also taking quite awhile to warm up to Summer here. We had about 100″ of rain this past Winter and things are slow this Summer. My Belladonna Naked Ladies are just now showing up and they’re usually flowering the first week of August, Several salvias that did just fine in their new climate home through the first two Winters here did not last through this past Winter, but are now re-surfacing, going all out. I’m hoping that they have a chance to flower and produce seed before another Winter hits us. I’m really maybe thinking that we may have an extended Fall. Enjoying my grasses that I received from you last year and also my Purple Sanguisorba that is flowering right now. I use a lot of Nassella tenuissima / Mexican Feather Grass and am liking it paired with the Sanguisorba. I have Morning Light Miscanthus also and like the idea of the White Sanguisorba paired with that…thank you for that idea ! Now I need to go back and drool over the pics some more…lol..

    Hi Sherry! We had more than our share of rain this summer, but not *that* much, thank goodness. An extended fall is always lovely, and I hope you get it. I have a feeling that we’ll get frost early this year, as some nights have already dipped into the 40s. It’s great to hear that the seeds did so well for you. Maybe you’ll find something new to try on this year’s list!
    -Nan

  4. Posted by Kimberly Thomas on September 15, 2017 at 8:41 am

    Nothing “disappointing” here! Stunning display as always :)

    Thank you, Kimberly. Happy Bloom Day to you!
    -Nan

  5. Nancy, you never disappoint ! You say “colorful but not spectacular”–I say always “spectacular”! I would love to see some of those spectacular individual blooms on a set of note cards on your etsy site!
    I am looking forward to the goldenrod with purple asters display.
    Verna

    Aw, thanks. Wouldn’t you know, the asters are starting to pop on this unexpectedly sunny morning. Well, there should be plenty of pretty garden pictures to share by the next Bloom Day. I too am looking forward to the purple-and-gold show!
    -Nan

  6. As always, a thrill to see what you have growing. Your photos always capture the plants and the landscape so well. And a pest I have not heard of yet. Hope it does not come west. Seems like there were more problems in the garden this year than some. The big issue here (besides Emerald Ash Borer) is Asian jumping worms.

    Good heavens, Linda – I think those worms are here too! I haven’t seen them in my own garden, but in a garden I look after about 20 miles away. I’ve noticed their odd movements and unusual size (in fact, I think of them as WOUS – worms of unusual size) but didn’t watch too closely because gosh, they kind of look like small snakes and I was fine letting them get away asap. I will have to try to take a closer look next time – not that there’s anything I can do about them.
    -Nan

  7. Posted by Judy Kopp on September 15, 2017 at 10:04 am

    Your garden is a delight…a little bit of heaven. I’m going to Etsy to check on your seeds. I can’t believe how many different plants you have. We retired to Maryville, TN, and found growing conditions are so different. We are doing more shade gardening, which I think is easier, but I love seeing all your sun loving plants. I look forward to your posts, and keep rereading them. Thank you for all the wonderful pictures.

    Happy Bloom Day, Judy! I don’t know about shade gardening being easier in general – you have your own set of challenges to deal with – but there are many days when I wish I had more shade here. I hope you and your garden enjoy a long and lovely fall season.
    -Nan

  8. Posted by Allan on September 15, 2017 at 10:36 am

    Thank you once again Nan, for brightening up another cold wet day in England. I’m on holiday in Norfolk, SE England, supposed to be one of the driest counties, not today though. Some lovely plants in your garden, I particularly like the Eryngium Leavensworthii, Emilia Javanica, and the Mirabilis Jalapa. Those lanternflies look nasty, hope they dont cause too much damage to your beautiful garden.
    – Allan

    How unfair for your holiday plans to get dampened, Allan. I’m glad I was able to provide something of a distraction. Only time will tell about the lanternflies. They’ll probably get much worse over the next decade or two, then gradually settle down into high and low cycles as has happened with other pests, such as the Japanese beetles and gypsy moths. At least they don’t feed on herbaceous plants. Here’s hoping that the sun comes out for you soon!
    -Nan

  9. Posted by henkelsophia@gmail.com on September 15, 2017 at 11:25 am

    I found your blog a few months ago, and then finally decided I needed to subscribe. Your garden is so beautiful. I have been trying to plant our front yard, we have a large city lot, but keep getting stuck. What, resources would you recommend to help me, I really love the lush feel of your plantings and want some of the same. Thank you in advance.

    Welcome! What worked for me was to concentrate on where I wanted the beds and paths to be first, starting closest to the house and working outward over a period of several years. (Trying to make too many beds at once is exhausting and expensive!) I planted a few larger perennials and shrubs early on but mostly concentrated on easy-from-seed annuals. I also set aside space for nursery beds and sowed lots of perennial seeds early on. By the time the seedlings were big enough to move, I had places ready for them in the garden. I also suggest going on lots of local garden tours, so you can see which plants thrive where you live. That’s also a good way to connect with other gardeners who may be happy to share plants and seeds with you. But don’t spend too much time comparing your garden with others: They all develop at their own pace, and the best reflect the personality of those who care for them, rather than any particular design rules. Have fun!
    -Nan

  10. Posted by Joy Snyder on September 15, 2017 at 12:08 pm

    I’m new to your Blog and I would like to know where you are located. You have the most wonderful pictures! Thanks for sharing!

    Thanks for the lovely comment, Joy! I live in southeastern Pennsylvania (upper Bucks County).
    -Nan

  11. So glad there will be seeds this year! I wonder if that Corydalis ochotensis will give you many — very interesting plant I’d love to try. The asters should be dazzling in October, but the colors already are so rich, with all the golds, purples and then crimson from the burnet. Happy Bloom Day, Nan.

    Oh yes, Denise, the Corydalis ochotensis seeds around enthusiastically. It takes frequent checking to catch the seeds before they pop, but I plan to collect as many as possible this fall, so I should have some to share. I will be sure to set some aside for you!
    -Nan

  12. Posted by Tiiu Mayer on September 15, 2017 at 12:36 pm

    Lovely. Thanks for the tour!!! My garden is a disaster this year due to focusing on my dog and earning agility titles. One bright note, however, is the Patrinia scabiosifolia that I raised from your seeds (planted 2016 spring). It has been blooming for a long time now and a most wonderful plant it is!! I’ve shared seedlings with many friends so it might eventually enjoy a larger following.

    Tiiu

    Good for you, Tiiu! My Sheltie and I used to have a great time with agility training – just for fun, though, not competition. The garden will always be there, but our furry friends are around for such a short time, it’s important to spend as much time with them as you can. Terrific to hear about the Patrinia success!
    -Nan

  13. Thanks for the butterfly reference tool and for another wonderful post, Nan! Your garden may not have met the mark you set for it given the tardy asters but it’s still a wonderful sight to behold. Although I always enjoy your photos and plant combinations, I don’t often find a lot of plants suitable to my very different climate but, in this post, I found several plants that I do grow or have grown, like African blue basil, a personal favorite, and flower-of-an-hour, which despite the warnings I read about its weed-potential, has maintained a very demure presence in my garden.

    When I put together a post, I actually think of you and wonder if you’ll see something that you too can grow. I got two this time! I too have heard that Hibiscus trionum can be weedy, but I find only a few random seedlings each year and enjoy them wherever they pop up.
    -Nan

  14. Nan, I went to our local annual master gardener plant sale this morning and just had to tell several others there about your website and your BEAUTIFUL gardens. I have never seen anything from your gardens that were less than spectacular! I also told them how hard you work each and every day. All I can say is “THANK YOU”.

    Ooh, a plant sale – I hope you found lots of interesting new things for your garden. Thank *you* so much for spreading the word about the blog!
    -Nan

  15. Posted by Lisa at Greenbow on September 15, 2017 at 8:54 pm

    Upon my first glance your garden looked very yellow right now. As I forged through all these photos I see a lot more color. Simply mind boggling. I don’t know how you do it. Happy GBBD.

    Hey there, Lisa. Yeah, I’d shown so much yellow last month that I wanted to share something different this month. Once the asters come along, they’ll add more to the overall show. We have a lot of autumn features to pack into the next four weeks. Happy Bloom Day!
    -Nan

  16. Posted by Jean on September 16, 2017 at 4:19 pm

    I think your garden looks lovely, a perfect illustration of the season. Each year I forget what September in my garden looks like, how charmingly blowsy it gets, the garden’s last hurrah. I really let it have the hurrah because I become lazy girl by mid-August. What is the range of the spotted lantern fly? Looks like a mean one. I am in Western Maryland.

    That’s my feeling about fall too, Jean: Just stand back and let the garden do its thing.

    The spotted lanternfly is currently only in southeastern PA. There’s a list of quarantined counties near the end of the info page I linked to.
    -Nan

  17. Cotton! I would have never thought of planting cotton in my flower bed. It is something that would interest children, I am sure. I must add it to my mile long list of all the new things I want to grow next year. Thanks for inspiring me.
    Jeannie @ GetMeToTheCountry.Blogspot.com

    I imagine children would indeed find it interesting, Jeannie. The flowers are beautiful, and it’s interesting to watch the bolls develop and open. Let me know if you need some seeds.
    -Nan

    • Posted by Jeannie on September 25, 2017 at 11:16 pm

      Thank you for the kind offer! I have not decided what I will be planting next year. I want to grow EVERYTHING!

  18. Posted by Judith on September 16, 2017 at 8:19 pm

    I am really glad you are including the veggie pics, the weeds and the insects. The latter help me with identification. You are a marvelous photographer. I really enjoy your pictures and your garden.

    Thank you, Judith. It’s very helpful to know what different people find of interest. I hope all is well with you and your garden!
    -Nan

  19. I really enjoyed seeing all the plants you hadn’t mentioned in previous posts. You always manage to grow things I’ve never heard of before. Looking forward to the seed post. I will have to look over my cynanchum for seeds. Seems to me it had seedpods at least one year, but maybe I am thinking of something else. I thought they looked vaguely like milkweed pods.

    Hi Kathy. It would be really neat if your plant defied the odds and produced seeds. The one you shared with me hasn’t yet. I’m hoping having some seed-grown plants around it might encourage them all to make more seed.
    -Nan

  20. Posted by Gabriella on September 17, 2017 at 4:54 pm

    I love to purchase seeds from you. It’s a chance to share a little bit of this glorious garden. Can’t wait to check out the etsy shop for new arrivals.

    I really appreciate that, Gabriella. I’m listing 2017 seeds there as I get them cleaned. I much prefer to share than sell, but the sales help to offset the costs of the yearly giveaway.
    -Nan

  21. You have never disappointed. Keep up the good gardening; you are an inspiration.

    Thank you, Mary; you’re very kind. Happy Bloom Day to you!
    -Nan

  22. Wonderful post as always. White leaf leather flower reminds me of Clematis. Are they related?

    Hi there, Lynda; thanks for checking in. Yes, the leather flower is a species of native clematis (Clematis glaucophylla).
    -Nan

  23. Posted by Bunny Church on September 19, 2017 at 3:43 pm

    You are one powerful force for good !! I just got to introduce you and Hayefield to a
    depressed, gardening buddy. You’ve made another conquest. He was rhapsodic.
    Rock on. your fan, Bunny

    Hey, you! Good to hear from you. And wow, that is high praise indeed; thank you so very much.
    -Nan

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