Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day – August 2017

Hayefield House August 2017 [Nancy J. Ondra]

Welcome to the August edition of Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day from Hayefield. Here in southeastern PA, we have been blessed with frequent rain this summer, so the garden is particularly lush right now. It’s been a busy time, trying to keep up with the vegetable harvest and collecting lots of interesting seeds. I like to give the whole garden a week or so of concentrated attention around now too: doing a thorough weeding, tidying up the edges, and making a final edit of everything else to balance heights and colors. As soon as that’s done, I can pretty much just stand back and enjoy the show for the next several months.

Orange coneflower (Rudbeckia fulgida var. fulgida), golden lace (Patrinia scabiosifolia), and New York ironweed (Vernonia noveboracensis) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Orange coneflower (Rudbeckia fulgida var. fulgida), golden lace (Patrinia scabiosifolia), and New York ironweed (Vernonia noveboracensis)

According to the gardening column in our local paper, August is a “difficult” month, with most flowers being past their peak. To my mind, it’s the opposite: the start of the very best of the gardening season. Here, August marks Stage One, highlighted by the flowering of three key perennials: orange coneflower (Rudbeckia fulgida var. fulgida), golden lace (Patrinia scabiosifolia), and New York ironweed (Vernonia noveboracensis).

Orange coneflower (Rudbeckia fulgida var. fulgida) and 'Skyracer' purple moor grass (Molinia caerulea) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Orange coneflower (Rudbeckia fulgida var. fulgida) and ‘Skyracer’ purple moor grass (Molinia caerulea)

I know orange coneflower (Rudbeckia fulgida var. fulgida) is common, and it can be a bit much in large expanses. Weaving among taller partners, though, and interspersed with plenty of green, it’s a beautiful addition to the late-summer show. It self-sows freely, so I have quite a bit of it. In late May, I cut most of it completely to the ground, but I leave some of the mid-border plants alone. That produces a nice multi-layer effect (as in the above photo) and extends the bloom season too.

Golden lace (Patrinia scabiosifolia), purple coneflower (Echinacea purpurea), and 'Goldenvale' white-stemmed bramble (Rubus cockburnianus) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Golden lace (Patrinia scabiosifolia), purple coneflower (Echinacea purpurea), and ‘Goldenvale’ white-stemmed bramble (Rubus cockburnianus)

Even a single clump of golden lace (Patrinia scabiosifolia) tends to have a layered look without pruning, due to its branching habit. If you let it self-sow, the multi-level effect is particularly noticeable. There’s a great deal of variation among the seedlings: Some are more compact and densely branched, while others are taller and much more open. A mix of the forms allowed to seed through beds and borders really does create a lace-like effect.

Golden lace (Patrinia scabiosifolia), New York ironweed (Vernonia noveboracensis), and orange coneflower (Rudbeckia fulgida var. fulgida) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Golden lace (Patrinia scabiosifolia), New York ironweed (Vernonia noveboracensis), and orange coneflower (Rudbeckia fulgida var. fulgida)

The height and color of golden lace make it a perfect partner for the sumptuous purple flowers of ironweeds (Vernonia). To be honest, as much as I adore the color of ironweeds, I’m pretty ruthless about keeping them limited in the garden (well, “limited” to a few dozen), partly because they self-sow so freely and partly because they’re so prone to rust here. I let them do what they want in the meadow, and they’ve happily made themselves at home out there.

New York ironweed (Vernonia noveboracensis) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

New York ironweed (Vernonia noveboracensis)

Back to the garden, though…there are many other beautiful and/or interesting things contributing to the show right now. Let’s start with the annuals and tender perennials.

Salvia radula [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Salvia radula

'Black Knight' pincushion flower (Scabiosa atropurpurea) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Black Knight’ pincushion flower (Scabiosa atropurpurea)

'Jester' millet (Pennisetum glaucum) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Jester’ millet (Pennisetum glaucum)

Vertigo fountain grass (Pennisetum purpureum 'Tift 8') [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Vertigo fountain grass (Pennisetum purpureum ‘Tift 8’)

Celeriac (Apium graveolens var. rapaceum) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Celeriac (Apium graveolens var. rapaceum)

Winged everlasting (Ammobium alatum) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Winged everlasting (Ammobium alatum)

Tobacco (<em>Nicotiana tabacum</em>): looking nice now, but not something I'd make a point of growing. When you sow the seeds of the variegated version, though, you get a lot of solid-green seedlings, and I didn't want to toss them all. [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum): looking nice now, but not something I’d make a point of growing. When you sow the seeds of the variegated version, though, you get a lot of solid-green seedlings, and I didn’t want to toss them all.

Variegated tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum 'Variegata'): that's what I wanted! One seedling with decent markings finally got established. I hope it flowers and sets seed before it gets eaten. [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Variegated tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum ‘Variegata’): that’s what I wanted! One seedling with decent markings finally got established. I hope it flowers and sets seed before it gets eaten by the hornworms.

'Silver Anouk' Spanish lavender (Lavandula stoechas): new for me this year. It's a terrific color, and at least twice as tall as any of my other lavenders. [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Silver Anouk’ Spanish lavender (Lavandula stoechas): new for me this year. It’s a terrific color, and at least twice as tall as any of my other lavenders.

'Evening Shades' sunflower (Helianthus annuus): the packet said 6 to 7 feet, but they're more like 9 to 10 feet, probably due to this summer's ample moisture [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Evening Shades’ sunflower (Helianthus annuus): the packet said 6 to 7 feet, but they’re more like 9 to 10 feet, probably due to this summer’s ample moisture

'Sunset' runner bean (Phaseolus coccineus) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Sunset’ runner bean (Phaseolus coccineus)

Gloriosa lily (Gloriosa superba) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Gloriosa lily (Gloriosa superba)

Some perennial and woody stars in the garden at the moment include the following…

Blackberry lily (Iris domestica [formerly Belamcanda chinensis]) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Blackberry lily (Iris domestica [formerly Belamcanda chinensis])

'Hello Yellow' blackberry lily (Iris domestica [formerly Belamcanda chinensis]) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Hello Yellow’ blackberry lily (Iris domestica [formerly Belamcanda chinensis])

'Erica' Culver's root (Veronicastrum virginicum) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Erica’ Culver’s root (Veronicastrum virginicum)

Volcano Pink with White Eye phlox (Phlox paniculata 'Barthirtyfive') [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Volcano Pink with White Eye phlox (Phlox paniculata ‘Barthirtyfive’)

White Japanese burnet (Sanguisorba tenuifolia 'Alba') [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

White Japanese burnet (Sanguisorba tenuifolia ‘Alba’)

Great blue lobelia (Lobelia siphilitica) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Great blue lobelia (Lobelia siphilitica)

'Anastasia' Orienpet lily (Lilium) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Anastasia’ Orienpet lily (Lilium)

'Black Beauty' Orienpet lily (Lilium) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Black Beauty’ Orienpet lily (Lilium)

'Blue River II' hardy hibiscus (Hibiscus) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Blue River II’ hardy hibiscus (Hibiscus)

'Heartthrob' hardy hibiscus (Hibiscus)

‘Heartthrob’ hardy hibiscus (Hibiscus)

'Autumn Minaret' daylily (Hemerocallis) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Autumn Minaret’ daylily (Hemerocallis)

Joe-Pye weed (Eutrochium maculatum) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Joe-Pye weed (Eutrochium maculatum)

Flowering spurge (Euphorbia corollata) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Flowering spurge (Euphorbia corollata)

Rattlesnake master (Eryngium yuccifolium) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Rattlesnake master (Eryngium yuccifolium)

'Emberglow' crocosmia (Crocosmia) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Emberglow’ crocosmia (Crocosmia)

Whiteleaf leather flower (Clematis glaucophylla) is very happy with its new arbor. It grew up one side, reached across the top (with regular guidance), and has sprawled nearly to the ground on the other side. [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Whiteleaf leather flower (Clematis glaucophylla) is very happy with its new arbor. It grew up one side, reached across the top (with regular guidance), and has sprawled nearly to the ground on the other side.

A seed-grown red-leaved peach (Prunus persica - possibly 'Foliis Rubris') [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

A seed-grown red-leaved peach (Prunus persica – possibly ‘Foliis Rubris’)

Silverleaf hydrangea (Hydrangea arborescens subsp. radiata) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Silverleaf hydrangea (Hydrangea arborescens subsp. radiata)

Blue Muffin arrowwood viburnum (Viburnum dentatum 'Christom') [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Blue Muffin arrowwood viburnum (Viburnum dentatum ‘Christom’)

There are some pretty things out in the meadow, too, besides the purple ironweeds.

Indian grass (Sorghastrum nutans) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Indian grass (Sorghastrum nutans)

Joe-Pye weed (Eutrochium maculatum) with Indian grass (Sorghastrum nutans) in the lower meadow [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Joe-Pye weed (Eutrochium maculatum) with Indian grass (Sorghastrum nutans) in the lower meadow

Small-flowered agrimony (Agrimonia parviflora) with New York ironweed (Vernonia noveboracensis) in the lower meadow [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Small-flowered agrimony (Agrimonia parviflora) with New York ironweed (Vernonia noveboracensis) in the lower meadow

Fuller's teasel (Dipsacus fullonum) in the lower meadow [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Fuller’s teasel (Dipsacus fullonum) in the lower meadow

Compass plant (Silphium perfoliatum) in the upper meadow [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Compass plant (Silphium perfoliatum) in the upper meadow

Clustered or short-toothed mountain mint (Pycnanthemum muticum) in the upper meadow [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Clustered or short-toothed mountain mint (Pycnanthemum muticum) in the upper meadow

I haven’t been shooting many combinations recently, because I’m waiting until I finish the garden cleanup. I did grab a few, though.

It's a bit past its peak, but this combination has been looking good for a few months now: star-of-Persia (Allium christophii), 'Mercury Rising' coreopsis, and 'Color Guard' yucca [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

It’s a bit past its peak, but this combination has been looking good for a few months now: star-of-Persia (Allium christophii), ‘Mercury Rising’ coreopsis, and ‘Color Guard’ yucca

Mexican feather grass (Stipa tenuissima) with 'Color Guard' yucca [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Mexican feather grass (Stipa tenuissima) with ‘Color Guard’ yucca

A container combination with 'Jester' millet (Pennisetum glaucum), 'Gay's Delight' coleus, 'Aztec Blue Velvet' verbena, and 'Sweet Georgia Light Green' sweet potato vine (Ipomoea batatas) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

A container combination with ‘Jester’ millet (Pennisetum glaucum), ‘Gay’s Delight’ coleus, ‘Aztec Blue Velvet’ verbena, and ‘Sweet Georgia Light Green’ sweet potato vine (Ipomoea batatas)

Another container combo, with 'Jester' millet (Pennisetum glaucum), 'Spitfire' coleus, and peppermint geranium (Pelargonium tomentosum) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Another container combo, with ‘Jester’ millet (Pennisetum glaucum), ‘Spitfire’ coleus, and peppermint geranium (Pelargonium tomentosum)

Orangey 'Sedona' used to be my must-have coleus, but I have a new favorite: 'Campfire'. Look at that intense color! Unlike 'Sedona', it is staying a solid orange-red, with no pink tints, in this full-sun planter. Companions here include gloriosa lily (Gloriosa superba), yellow 'Main Street River Walk' coleus, purple queen (Tradescantia pallida 'Purpurea'), and 'Sweet Georgia Heart Red' sweet potato vine (Ipomoea batatas). [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Orangey ‘Sedona’ used to be my must-have coleus, but I have a new favorite: ‘Campfire’. Look at that intense color! Unlike ‘Sedona’, it is staying a solid orange-red, with no pink tints, in this full-sun planter. Companions here include gloriosa lily (Gloriosa superba), yellow ‘Main Street River Walk’ coleus, purple queen (Tradescantia pallida ‘Purpurea’), and ‘Sweet Georgia Heart Red’ sweet potato vine (Ipomoea batatas).

Prairie blazing star (Liatris pycnostachya) with Brazilian vervain (Verbena bonariensis) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Prairie blazing star (Liatris pycnostachya) with Brazilian vervain (Verbena bonariensis)

Rozanne geranium (Geranium 'Gerwat') with upright spurge (Euphorbia stricta 'Golden Foam') [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Rozanne geranium (Geranium ‘Gerwat’) with upright spurge (Euphorbia stricta ‘Golden Foam’)

In the front garden (highlights from lower left): 'Sun Power' hosta, Japanese maple (Acer palmatum), 'Heartthrob' hibiscus, orange coneflower (Rudbeckia fulgida var. fulgida), 'Isla Gold' tansy (Tanacetum vulgare), 'Royal Purple' smokebush (Cotinus coggygria), and 'Red Majestic' contorted hazel (Corylus avellana) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

In the front garden (highlights from lower left): ‘Sun Power’ hosta, Japanese maple (Acer palmatum), ‘Heartthrob’ hibiscus, orange coneflower (Rudbeckia fulgida var. fulgida), ‘Isla Gold’ tansy (Tanacetum vulgare), ‘Royal Purple’ smokebush (Cotinus coggygria), and ‘Red Majestic’ contorted hazel (Corylus avellana)

What really pleases, and amazes, me is how good the garden and meadow areas look as a whole. Sometimes I just wander around and take it all in. Here’s a quick trot through the highlights.

The Upper Meadow at Hayefield - August 2017 [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

The Upper Meadow at Hayefield – August 2017

The Arc Borders at Hayefield - August 2017 [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

The Arc Borders at Hayefield – August 2017

The TDF Border at Hayefield - August 2017 [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

The TDF Border at Hayefield – August 2017

The TDF Border at Hayefield - August 2017 [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

The TDF Border at Hayefield – August 2017

The Shrubbery at Hayefield - August 2017 [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

The Shrubbery at Hayefield – August 2017

The Shrubbery at Hayefield - August 2017 [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

The Shrubbery at Hayefield – August 2017

The Lower Meadow at Hayefield - August 2017 [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

The Lower Meadow at Hayefield – August 2017

The Lower Meadow at Hayefield - August 2017 [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

The Lower Meadow at Hayefield – August 2017

The Perennial Meadow at Hayefield in August (rather redundant, considering all of the "natural" meadow just outside the fence, but it was an experiment I started several years ago and kept because it turned out so well) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

The Perennial Meadow at Hayefield in August (rather redundant, considering all of the “natural” meadow just outside the fence, but it was an experiment I started several years ago and kept because it turned out so well)

The Vegetable Garden at Hayefield - August 2017 [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

The Vegetable Garden at Hayefield – August 2017

The Back Garden at Hayefield - August 2017 [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

The Back Garden at Hayefield – August 2017

The Happy Garden at Hayefield - August 2017 [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

The Happy Garden at Hayefield – August 2017

The Courtyard at Hayefield - August 2017 [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

The Courtyard at Hayefield – August 2017

The Courtyard at Hayefield - August 2017 [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

The Courtyard at Hayefield – August 2017

The Courtyard at Hayefield - August 2017 [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

The Courtyard at Hayefield – August 2017

The Front Garden at Hayefield - August 2017 [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

The Front Garden at Hayefield – August 2017

The Diagonal Path at Hayefield - August 2017 [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

The Diagonal Path at Hayefield – August 2017

The Side Garden at Hayefield - August 2017 [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

The Side Garden at Hayefield – August 2017

The Side Garden at Hayefield - August 2017 [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

The Side Garden at Hayefield – August 2017

The Side Garden at Hayefield - August 2017 [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

The Side Garden at Hayefield – August 2017

The Side Garden at Hayefield - August 2017 [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

The Side Garden at Hayefield – August 2017

The Side Garden at Hayefield - August 2017 [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

The Side Garden at Hayefield – August 2017

The Side Garden at Hayefield - August 2017 [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

The Side Garden at Hayefield – August 2017

The Side Garden at Hayefield - August 2017 [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

The Side Garden at Hayefield – August 2017

The Side Garden at Hayefield - August 2017 [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

The Side Garden at Hayefield – August 2017

Well, that was quite a stroll for a late-summer day, so it’s time for a break.

Duncan under the solar panels at Hayefield [Nancy J. Ondra]

Find yourself a patch of shade and chill out for a bit, then check out more summery garden splendor from the participants in this month’s Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day. You can find the list at Carol’s main GBBD post at May Dreams Gardens. Thanks for visiting!

32 responses to this post.

  1. Stunning…all I can say

    Thanks! Happy Bloom Day to you.
    -Nan

  2. Posted by Lisa at Greenbow on August 15, 2017 at 6:36 am

    Your garden looks great for August. Must be all that rain. I wish I could say the same. I love Iron Weed. I have tried to get it established here but have failed miserably. I think it might be because I don’t have full sun for it. I have wanted it ever since I found a clump in the wild and it had a comma butterfly chrysalis on it. What is that yellow fruit by the Joe-Pye weed? The berries on my Arrowwood are eaten almost as soon as they appear it seems. I love that big ole clematis. I finally have a clematis (Ernest Markham) going over a small arbor by the side gate. Can’t tell you how many I have tried. Cute picture of Duncan (?) using the shade of the solar panels. Double duty for those panels. I hope you are having a good time away. Happy GBBD.

    Hey there, Lisa! Yes, you may be right about the shade being a problem with ironweed in your garden. The fruits in the garden shot of Joe-Pye are the hips of Rosa achburensis. The berries on my Blue Muffin arrowwood don’t last long either; the birds are always busy down there. Congrats on the clematis! They do require some patience, don’t they? And yes, it has worked out great to have that shade structure that also supplies all of our electricity. All the best to you!
    -Nan

  3. Posted by Liz Dutton on August 15, 2017 at 7:13 am

    What a great way to start my morning! A cup of coffee and a virtual stroll through your garden. You inspire me and teach me so very much! Thank you!!

    Hi Liz! Thanks so much for joining me on the virtual garden walk, so you could see it in some sun. The actual garden is very dark and drippy today.
    -Nan

  4. Posted by Jean Spangenberg on August 15, 2017 at 7:17 am

    Nan, as always, stunningly beautiful!
    All of your flowers, wild and cultivated, are such a labor of love that photos of them give me a deep feeling of peace when I see them.
    Wishing you a peaceful end of summer.
    Jean

    Thank you for that lovely thought, Jean. I wish the same for you and yours.
    -Nan

  5. Well, your garden certainly overcame the dry conditions it suffered from last year! I could go on and on with comments but I will stick with two questions.
    Were there any surprise losses of plants you considered reliably drought tolerant? Are any plants still showing the impact this year? (I’m in the planning stage of a bed far from the house that will not see the water hose after it is established.)

    Gosh, the despair of last year’s drought is a distant memory. At the moment, I can’t think of any plants that I ended up losing, or that are showing problems this year. Oh, well, except for the white ash trees, which are already under attack by the ash borers. If I think of anything that might be useful to you, I’ll let you know.
    -Nan

  6. Delightful! How wonderful to browse the pictures, but hard to take in all that beauty at once!

    Yes, it’s a lot, isn’t it? I appreciate you taking the time to stop by today.
    -Nan

  7. Always such a pleasure to take a stroll through your garden. Just stunning and you certainly prove that August gardens have lots to offer.

    Hi Linda! It’s exciting to think that there’s still so much more to come: the goldenrods, and asters, and grasses, and fall color….
    -Nan

  8. Posted by Sally Nachlas on August 15, 2017 at 9:05 am

    Absolutely beautiful. Everything seems so happy in its place and content with its neighbors, color, height flowing throughout. Your workload is unimaginable. How do you keep the stilt grass and Japanese honeysuckle out of your meadows? They’re spectacular. Have you ever grown Kalimeris incisa in the beds? It looks lovely with many of the combinations you’ve shared with us here. Thanks for all the wonderful suggestions you’ve contributed to my own gardens.

    Thanks, Sally! Interesting that you mentioned stilt grass; it was horrible last year but I haven’t noticed it as much this year. It’ll probably be more visible when it heads to seed soon. And the Japanese honeysuckle–well, it’s out there too, especially along the back hedgerow. There, I mow 3 or 4 times a year; the rest of the meadow, I usually mow only once or twice. I was working around Kalimeris incisa in another garden today, where it was growing next to the pink flowers of Allium ‘Millennium’ in a very pretty pairing. Somehow I’ve never warmed up to it here, but maybe I’ll try it eventually.
    -Nan

  9. All the purple and yellow blooms look so good together!
    Love the lilies, and that must be the tallest sunflower in the world!
    Happy Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day!

    It’s certainly a bright and cheerful pairing. I’m really looking forward to the rich purple New England asters joining the show in the next few weeks. I know some sunflowers (like ‘Russian Mammoth’) can get even taller than ‘Evening Shades’, but these are definitely the largest ones that have ever flowered here. Happy Bloom Day right back to you, Lea!
    -Nan

  10. Posted by Cora Howlett on August 15, 2017 at 9:26 am

    I appreciate that your gardens are wildlife friendly. Bet you have lots of birds, bees and butterflies. My yellow lace (Patrinia scabiosifolia) attracts sooo many different kinds of bugs…Love it even though it isn’t native. Plant it and they will come! Can’t understand why more people don’t plant native (and other) flowers, grasses, shrubs and trees. Grass does nothing for wildlife! Thank you for what you do.

    You’re not kidding, Cora: the patrinia is always abuzz with a wide variety of insects–only surpassed, I think, by the mountain mints in the meadow. And wow, I’d meant to mention how abundant the butterflies are this year. I’ve been even more aware of monarchs this summer, since I’ve been doing a daily count for the Monarch Watch Citizen Scientist Program. I’m glad I don’t have to count the various swallowtails and skippers too: that would be a full-time job!
    -Nan

  11. Posted by Tiiu Mayer on August 15, 2017 at 10:04 am

    Inspirational as always. Enjoying your patrinia which I started from seed last year (via HPS). That red-leaved peach is stunning!

    Good to hear from you, Tiiu. I’m happy to hear abut the patrinia. I need to start collecting seeds from that peach tree. I was given to me as a seedling maybe 15 years ago but has been setting fruit for only the past few years. It would be great to get more started, and to be able to share the seeds with others.
    -Nan

  12. I always enjoy your garden tours via this blog. There is always some plant which I have not seen before and each trip is an adventure! Enjoy these August days.

    Hi Layanee! It is as un-August-like as you can imagine here today. I was out working in other gardens for many hours but finally needed to come home to get warm and dry. I hope you and your own garden are dry for this Bloom Day.
    -Nan

  13. Amazing! Oh that the billowy abundance of high summer, so beautiful in your images, could linger in our gardens for a bit longer. Here many plants are looking a bit weary with the lack of rain and summer heat.

    I wish I could send you some moisture and “coolth,” Peter. We’ve certainly had more than our share this year. And yet, the same plants continue to be garden stars. Hooray for tough plants!
    -Nan

  14. Beautiful, as always, Nan! Thanks for sharing.

    Thanks, Barbara, and Happy Bloom Day to you!
    -Nan

  15. Posted by Patty on August 15, 2017 at 11:22 am

    Reading your post was the perfect way to start my day before heading out to the yard to work. i’m in awe of everything you’ve accomplished on your acreage. Nan, was your greenhouse a kit? I am thinking of getting one for my city lot here in Seattle, and like the looks of yours…. patty

    Hi there, Patty. Yep, the greenhouse was a kit from Cedar-Built Greenhouses in Canada: http://cedarbuilt.homestead.com/ They offer many sizes and styles.
    -Nan

  16. Posted by Barbara Dashwood on August 15, 2017 at 12:11 pm

    Hi Nan! Thanks very much for the tour through Hayefield’s August garden. You are indeed correct in saying there is a lot going on in August. The Hibiscus have really been catching my eye this year and it has been wonderful seeing them weave their way in your gardens. The blackberry lily also caught my attention and it left me wondering how much water it needs to get by. As usual, we’ve had a very dry summer here in Victoria. We got our first short but sweet rain since early June for a few hours on Saturday night. Thanks again. Barbara.

    Ow, yet another dry year for you? I’m sorry to hear that. The blackberry lily seems to be very adaptable, so I think it would be worth a try for you. Now, the hibiscus are definitely loving the extra moisture…and the Japanese beetles are loving the hibiscus. It’s always something, you know?
    -Nan

  17. Your garden is exuberant to say the least! While your garden is peaking, mine in SoCal is at its lowest point after months without rain, although unlike the PNW we’ve enjoyed a milder summer than usual thus far. I love all the cheerful yellow flowers you have, your always wonderful plant combinations (especially the one with the Allium seedheads) and, of course, the alpaca sighting.

    Hey, Kris. With so many folks checking in from areas that have been dry this summer, I’m feeling a bit guilty to be showing off the bounty here this month. Sigh. I imagine we’ll be back to the usual hot and dry again next year. In the meantime, I’ll send some good thoughts for rain out your way, for whatever that’s worth. Duncan says hi!
    -Nan

  18. Posted by JessB on August 15, 2017 at 2:44 pm

    Wonderful. Thank you for posting.

    Thank you, Jess. Happy Bloom Day to you!
    -Nan

  19. New York Ironweed, now I know the name. I have it growing in the fields around my house and had no idea what it was called. It is beautiful this time of the year but I never thought of letting it grow in the flower bed.

    Everything is just wonderful. Thanks for sharing on GBBD.

    Jeannie @ GetMeToTheCountry.Blogspot.com

    Hah – I bet you’ll eventually find it in your garden whether you invite it in or not. Now that you’ve been properly introduced, you can keep an eye out for it. Thanks for visiting today, Jeannie!
    -Nan

  20. Oh, Nan. I soooo look forward to your posts. Can you do another one tomorrow? ;)
    Nonetheless, thank you for this summery tour thru your amazing garden!

    Oh, Holly, you’re funny. Though I do have a few (dozen) photos that didn’t quite make the cut for this one….
    -Nan

  21. It’s all beautiful, Nan! So glad you’ve had a wonderful growing season! I remember your drought last year, or the year before. Glorious garden!!

    Though we can’t pretend to have any control over the weather , we can certainly be grateful for whatever goodness we get, right? I appreciate your kind message, Wendy, and wish you and your garden whatever weather you’d like best.
    -Nan

  22. Posted by Judith on August 15, 2017 at 4:24 pm

    This is a little off the topic of your glorious August garden, but I was taken by the rock and wood path. How was it made?

    Hi Judith. I wrote a post about the construction process when I blogged at Gardening Gone Wild. You can find the post there: Walk This Way. If you have any other questions about it, feel free to ask here or email me directly.
    -Nan

  23. Posted by plantgeeksgarden on August 15, 2017 at 5:04 pm

    What an amazing garden! I used to live in PA (in Center County and near Longwood Gardens) and your garden reminds me of my time there. I can only hope that as our garden matures, that it looks this good.

    The black Scabiosa is fabulous. I really like dark flowers and even had some of this in my wedding bouquet. I also can’t help but comment on your gravel/timber pathway. I love the repetition of it. Really enjoyed your post!

    Welcome, fellow plant geek! I really appreciate you saying that the garden reminds you of Pennsylvania. I think it’s ideal when a garden gives you a sense of place, even if not all of the plants are local natives. Speaking of non-natives…you’ve reminded me that I need to plant a lot more of that black scabiosa next year. It truly is a treasure for bouquets and gorgeous (if a little sprawly) in the garden too.
    -Nan

  24. I wish I could have made ‘Silver Anouk’ as happy in my SoCal garden. Your gardens look as fresh and as manicured as June. Amazingly good, Nan.

    Thank you, Denise. I wonder what the deal is with ‘Silver Anouk’ thriving in this summer’s humid to wet weather. All of my other lavenders are distinctly unhappy. Based on its eccentric performance so far, I’m tempted to leave it in the garden to see if it makes it through the winter, even though I wouldn’t normally expect Spanish lavender to survive here. I’d sure like to see it in full flower.
    -Nan

  25. Just lovely. I would say that I don’t know what I’d do without my ‘Goldsturm’ rudbeckias. As I wrote in my Bloom Day post, they knit my late summer garden together. We are in a kind of in between stage right now. I’m cutting and fluffing as fast as I can to prepare the garden for its September aster goodness. It was fun to hear you were too.~~Dee

    Great to hear from you, Dee. I used to sniff at “common” perennials but eventually came to realize that they’re common for a reason: because they are easy to propagate, easy to grow, and dependable performers. The rudbeckias look as good in your Oklahoma garden as they do here in PA. I too am anticipating the flowering of the asters–though if any more bees and butterflies are drawn into the garden, it may become impossible to walk through during daylight hours!
    -Nan

  26. Posted by Tom on August 16, 2017 at 7:52 pm

    We’ve also had an unusual rain and temperature pattern in Kansas this August. Looks like it helped your newer grass paths–almost as interesting as the beds. Your garden looks great, Nan. Best wishes.

    You’re right, Tom: The rain has kept the paths looking really good. Turning the mulch paths over to “low-mow” grass ended up being an excellent decision, though they do need regular mowing–more because of the white clover that seeded in than because of the grass. The green sure does show off the bright flowers nicely. Thanks so much for taking the tour!
    -Nan

  27. Oh my. You are insane and I hope you don’t think that’s offensive.
    What a wonderful difference the rain has made. I’m so much happier seeing your gardens so full so I can only imagine how you feel about it! I love the dark hibiscus with the golden background, makes me want to try a few more next year and forget about the beetles and sawflies and dry soils which usually hold mine back.
    The meadows look fantastic. What a buzzing and fluttering bonanza that must be! I do see that telltale torn-turf look in the lawn of your arc borders, I’ve banned those pennisetums from my garden because of that reseeding habit.
    I love your posts, thanks so much for all the work you put into them.
    hmmmm. The greenhouse was from a kit… just one search and click away…

    Hah – no offense taken. I often feel giddy just looking at the garden, as well as all the birds and bees and butterflies.

    Well-spotted, you, about where the fountain grasses have seeded into the turf. Sigh. I’m gradually replacing them with prairie dropseed, and I’ve been cutting off their flowerheads for several years now, but I can’t do much those already in the turf. Funny thing: I can even identify fountain grasses by sound–when I run over the few clumps of them that have seeded into the meadow. They are so dense that the brush mower makes a distinctive noise when it goes over them. To be fair, prairie dropseed creates a distinctive sound of its own: grind…clunk…silence (what happens when its tough leaf blades wrap around the head of my trimmer-mower or string trimmer–the only disadvantage of using it as an edging plant).

    You’re thinking about a greenhouse? I’ve been pleased with my Cedar-Built kit on the whole. Mom and I encountered some glitches during the assembly, and of course it wasn’t quite as easy as it sounded, but there were no major problems, and I think it was good quality and a fair price.
    -Nan

  28. Posted by Carolyn Stephenson on August 17, 2017 at 7:12 pm

    Wow, what a great tour of your garden. Gardens here in the UK look a little bit sad come August, but yours looks so full of life. I was especially taken by the pop of purple from the adorable looking peach trees and the coleus ‘Campfire’.

    Greetings, Carolyn. We’re lucky to have some wonderful later-blooming native perennials and grasses here. It sure helps to have a lot of sun, as well. Thank you for taking the tour!
    -Nan

  29. I am jealous of your Heartthrob hibiscus. The deer ate the buds off mine. Also chomped on some common magenta phlox and a Hydrangea arborescens–but left the roses alone, which were last year’s favorite. Do you have much trouble with deer? I loved the red peach tree and the dark red scabious, as other commenters have mentioned.

    Hah – I would have liked to show the ‘Fireball’ hibiscus too, but it is closer to the front gate and got munched when the deer were making forays into the garden earlier this summer. Since then, they’re mostly been congregating in the nearby corn and soybean fields.
    -Nan

  30. Posted by Judy Kopp on August 19, 2017 at 10:24 am

    Nan, I just love your garden. Your use of color and foliage is wonderful. My daughter wants us to turn her front yard into a garden…no grass, just paths with flowers and shrubs. It will be a spring and summer garden, as they are not there in the summer. Your gardens have given me a lot of ideas. You have the best Blog, and I did buy all your books. Thank you for taking the time to write what we are looking at. I really appreciate that.

    Thank *you*, Judy. There would be little point to blogging without connecting with readers like you. It’s great to hear that you’ve found some ideas for your daughter’s front-yard garden. The only change I’d make to mine–assuming I had an unlimited budget–would be some sort of solid paths. Even the “no-mow/low-mow” grass needs regular edging and trimming, and the previous mulched paths required regular topping-up and a lot of weeding. Some sort of paved paths would also provide something to look at during the winter.
    -Nan

  31. Posted by Sue Gilmour on August 21, 2017 at 7:12 am

    Your gardens are wonderful, love that red leaf peach! And the hibiscus! Have never seen the Patrina for sale, it’s a great looking plant. The gardens are the best here they have ever been as we have been getting regular rain, thankfully. I do have hibiscus in bud, can’t wait. I have been deadheading daylilies and cutting out the gray crap off the rudbeckias. That goes into the green bin.
    I have a new trick to keep the deer out of the gardens. I use 5 gal buckets turned upside down with empty cans tied together and put on the top of the buckets. Then I string 10 lb test fishing line from the cans to a few bamboo poles to create a string around my gardens, you really have to have a bucket about every 50 feet. The deer walk into the string, the cans fall off and scare them, this has worked for me for the last 2 years, you just have to walk around and check on the cans to make sure they are on the bucket everyday. I always leave it up when we have gardeners visit so they can see it!
    I tried the vernonia from seed but no luck, maybe I should just leave it in the garden over winter. Same with the sanguisorba.
    I have lots of fulgida in bloom and it’s backed with persicaria firetail, awesome combination. I eat my lunch in the gardens and love all the colour this time of year. The big lilies are just waning now but I have lots of pots of agapanthus, tigridia, dahlias and calla lilies so when I have a bare spot I just plop in a pot of colour, love this portable colour!
    So many berries this year especially on the pagoda dogwoods, I leave as many as I can as they reseed and have a wonderful horizontal look. Lots of new birds this year too, must have been the short winter and long spring. No monarchs yet but many other butterflies.
    It’s been an amazing summer and so glad we have lots of season left with fall asters and grasses. Those grasses keep me happy till the heaviest snow falls. Take care, TTFN Sue

    Great to hear from you, Sue! It’s lovely that your garden is bringing you such happiness this year. I’m so glad that you can be outside to enjoy it. I appreciate the tip about the deer. As I mentioned in another comment, the deer around here are busy gorging in the soybean fields and have been leaving the garden alone recently, but when they come back, it would be easy for me to rig up something like that over the places that they can easily get in. Thanks!
    -Nan

  32. Posted by Allan on August 22, 2017 at 5:53 am

    Hi Nan, thanks once again, for brightening up my day, with your lovely photographs and comments. August in the North of England has been a wash out, so much rain, still I suppose it saves on getting the hosepipe out. Just one question, is the Liatris Pycnostachya purple? I have looked on line (for seed) and in most of the images it appears to be a dark pink.

    Hi Allan! Ah, rain for you too; I should have guessed. The liatris…well, I definitely wouldn’t call it a dark pink, but not decidedly purple, either. To my eye, it’s close to the color of Verbena bonariensis but with a bit more of a pink tint. I should have lots of seeds this fall if you’d like some.
    -Nan

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