Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day – July 2017

The Side Garden July 2017 [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Happy Bloom Day, all! So far, this summer has been a winner here in southeastern PA, with a nice amount of rain every few days. That means lots of mowing and weeding, of course, but no time wasted on watering, so there’s been time for some summer projects as well. More on that later; for now, let’s start with portraits of highlights from the last few weeks, beginning with some annuals.

Blue woodruff (Asperula orientalis) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Blue woodruff (Asperula orientalis)

Variegated dayflower (Commelina communis f. aureostriata) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Variegated dayflower (Commelina communis f. aureostriata)

Chinese forget-me-not (Cynoglossum amabile) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Chinese forget-me-not (Cynoglossum amabile)

A new blue for me this year: violet-vein viper's bugloss (Echium lusitanicum). I started the seeds last summer without much hope of ever seeing the flowers, but the plants surprised me by making it through the winter. [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

A new blue for me this year: violet-vein viper’s bugloss (Echium lusitanicum). I started the seeds last summer without much hope of ever seeing the flowers, but the plants surprised me by making it through the winter.

Violet-vein viper's bugloss (Echium lusitanicum) with hare's ear (Bupleurum rotundifolium) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Violet-vein viper’s bugloss (Echium lusitanicum) with hare’s ear (Bupleurum rotundifolium)

'Irish Poet' tassel flower (Emilia javanica) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Irish Poet’ tassel flower (Emilia javanica)

'Orange Crush' four-o'clock (Mirabilis jalapa) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Orange Crush’ four-o’clock (Mirabilis jalapa)

Large-flowered collomia (Collomia grandiflora): not a spectacular garden flower, but it's delicately pretty and nice for something different. [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Large-flowered collomia (Collomia grandiflora): not a spectacular garden flower, but it’s delicately pretty and nice for something different.

If this intriguing flower were on some obscure rock-garden plant, it would probably be much in demand. But it's just ordinary arugula (Eruca sativa). [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

If this intriguing flower were on some obscure rock-garden plant, it would probably be much in demand. But it’s just ordinary arugula (Eruca sativa).

The first of this year's flowers on the black-leaved cotton (Gossypium herbaceum 'Nigrum') [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

The first of this year’s flowers on the black-leaved cotton (Gossypium herbaceum ‘Nigrum’)

The mixed sweet peas (Lathyrus odoratus) are finally in flower [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

The mixed sweet peas (Lathyrus odoratus) are finally in flower

This petunia started out years ago as 'Blanket Zinfandel', in the large container by the barn door. It produces a few seedlings each year, in varying shades of magenta. The green tendrils near the blooms are the linked leaf tips of gloriosa lily (Gloriosa superba). [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

This petunia started out years ago as ‘Blanket Zinfandel’, in the large container by the barn door. It produces a few seedlings each year, in varying shades of magenta. The green tendrils near the blooms are the linked leaf tips of gloriosa lily (Gloriosa superba).

After missing 'Tip Top Mahogany' nasturtium (Tropaeolum majus) for many years, I'm grateful to Chiltern Seed for offering it again this year. Its bright red flowers are spectacular against the chartreuse leaves. The purple-gray foliage here is from a self-sown seedling of redleaf rose (Rosa glauca). [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

After missing ‘Tip Top Mahogany’ nasturtium (Tropaeolum majus) for many years, I’m grateful to Chiltern Seed for offering it again this year. Its bright red flowers are spectacular against the chartreuse leaves. The purple-gray foliage here is from a self-sown seedling of redleaf rose (Rosa glauca).

Red spider zinnia (Zinnia tenuifolia) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Red spider zinnia (Zinnia tenuifolia)

'Drama Queen' poppy was a star in bloom last month, and the patch of pods was quite a sight too. I gathered the mature pods for crafting and collected lots of seed at the same time. [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Drama Queen’ annual poppy was a star in bloom last month, and the patch of pods was quite a sight too. I gathered the mature pods for crafting and collected lots of seed at the same time.

The greens in this shot look kind of funky, but the pods of 'Cramers' Plum' love-in-a-mist (Nigella damascena) really are this dark. [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

The greens in this shot look kind of funky, but the pods of ‘Cramers’ Plum’ love-in-a-mist (Nigella damascena) really are this dark.

New for me this year: 'Transformer' fennel flower (Nigella orientalis) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

New for me this year: ‘Transformer’ fennel flower (Nigella orientalis)

'Pennies in Bronze' honesty (Lunaria annua) in late June [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Pennies in Bronze’ honesty (Lunaria annua) in late June

'Pennies in Bronze' honesty (Lunaria annua) in mid-July [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Pennies in Bronze’ honesty (Lunaria annua) in mid-July

Statice (Limonium sinuatum) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Statice (Limonium sinuatum)

Winged everlasting (Ammobium alatum) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Winged everlasting (Ammobium alatum)

Have you noticed a theme in the last several shots? One of my “things” for this summer is harvesting and drying herbs, flowers, and seedpods for sales this fall and winter. I tried something different this year: Before I bring the prepared bunches into the house, I hang them on the back-porch clothesline for the afternoon. Besides speeding the drying, it gives the spiders and bugs a chance to find other homes.

"Pre-drying" herbs and flowers outdoors [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

“Pre-drying” herbs and flowers outdoors

The loft is a terrific spot for drying. I leave the ceiling fan on full-time and use another small fan at night, or when it's very humid. I usually keep the window shutters mostly closed, so the bundles aren't exposed to direct sun. Most things dry in 3 to 4 days, and the entire house smells wonderful. [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

The loft is a terrific spot for drying. I leave the ceiling fan on full-time and use another small fan at night, or when it’s very humid. I usually keep the window shutters mostly closed, so the bundles aren’t exposed to direct sun. Most things dry in 3 to 4 days, and the entire house smells wonderful.

Ah yes...after almost a decade since the last population boom of Japanese beetles around here, they are back in abundance. Any roses that dare to bloom are getting devoured right away. [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Ah yes…after almost a decade since the last population boom of Japanese beetles around here, they are back in abundance. Any roses that dare to bloom are getting devoured right away.

The rugosa roses are still producing loads of buds, though, so I've been gathering them every morning and evening and drying them too. [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

The rugosa roses are still producing loads of buds, though, so I’ve been gathering them every morning and evening and drying them too.

Going back to the garden: It’s prime time for summer perennials as well, including…

Hollyhock! It's just the "ordinary" Alcea rosea, but it's not at all common for any hollyhock to look this good here. The leaves are almost invariably disfigured with rust, weakening the plants so much that they produce few, if any, blooms. But this year, several plants are flowering in various spots, and they are perfectly pristine. The Japanese beetles will probably start munching on them soon, but I'm enjoying the plants while they last. [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Hollyhock! It’s just the “ordinary” Alcea rosea, but it’s not at all common for any hollyhock to look this good here. The leaves are almost invariably disfigured with rust, weakening the plants so much that they produce few, if any, blooms. But this year, several plants are flowering in various spots, and they are perfectly pristine. The Japanese beetles will probably start munching on them soon, but I’m enjoying the plants while they last.

This charming hollyhock relative, musk mallow (Malva moschata), showed up on its own last year and has been flowering for almost a month now. [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

This charming hollyhock relative, musk mallow (Malva moschata), showed up on its own last year and has been flowering for almost a month now.

Rusty foxglove (Digitalis ferruginea) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Rusty foxglove (Digitalis ferruginea)

Meadowsweet (Filipendula ulmaria): one of my favorite perennials for fragrance! [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Meadowsweet (Filipendula ulmaria): one of my favorite perennials for fragrance

Queen-of-the-prairie (Filipendula rubra) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Queen-of-the-prairie (Filipendula rubra)

July is peak time for daylilies (Hemerocallis), but I chose just two to show here:

'Nona's Garnet Spider' daylily (Hemerocallis) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Nona’s Garnet Spider’ daylily (Hemerocallis)

'Milk Chocolate' daylily (Hemerocallis) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Milk Chocolate’ daylily (Hemerocallis)

And what would summer be without purple coneflowers? They look equally at home in the meadow and in the garden.

Purple coneflower (Echinacea purpurea) that seeded into the meadow [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Purple coneflower (Echinacea purpurea) that seeded into the meadow

Purple coneflower (Echinacea purpurea) paired with 'Raspberry Wine' bee balm (Monarda) and 'Isla Gold' tansy (Tanacetum vulgare) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Purple coneflower (Echinacea purpurea) paired with ‘Raspberry Wine’ bee balm (Monarda) and ‘Isla Gold’ tansy (Tanacetum vulgare)

Common hogweed (Heracleum sphondylium): Not the menace giant hogweed (H. mantegazzianum), though apparently it too can cause exposed skin to become very sensitive to sunlight (a condition more elegantly known as phytophotodermatitis). I didn't plant it, but it's a good-looking plant, so I'm just being careful to not touch it. [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Common hogweed (Heracleum sphondylium): Not the menace giant hogweed (H. mantegazzianum), though apparently it too can cause exposed skin to become very sensitive to sunlight (a condition more elegantly known as phytophotodermatitis). I didn’t plant it, but it’s a good-looking thing, so I’m just being careful to not touch it.

Flowering for the first time here: giant fleabane (Inula magnifica) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Flowering for the first time here: giant fleabane (Inula magnifica)

Blackberry lily (Iris domestica, formerly Belamcanda chinensis) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Blackberry lily (Iris domestica, formerly Belamcanda chinensis)

Chalice flower, or vine-leaved kitaibelia (Kitaibelia vitifolia): single white flowers all summer on bushy, 4- to 5-foot tall plants. Even its most ardent fans couldn't call it spectacular, but it's charming and interesting for something different. [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Chalice flower, or vine-leaved kitaibelia (Kitaibelia vitifolia): single white flowers all summer on bushy, 4- to 5-foot tall plants. Even its most ardent fans couldn’t call it spectacular, but it’s charming and interesting for something different.

'Axminster Streaked' balloon flower (Platycodon grandiflorus) with wild quinine (Parthenium integrifolium) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Axminster Streaked’ balloon flower (Platycodon grandiflorus) with wild quinine (Parthenium integrifolium)

Rozanne geranium (Geranium 'Gerwat') with upright spurge (Euphorbia stricta 'Golden Foam') and 'Dark Towers' beardtongue (Penstemon) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Rozanne geranium (Geranium ‘Gerwat’) with upright spurge (Euphorbia stricta ‘Golden Foam’) and ‘Dark Towers’ beardtongue (Penstemon)

Purple toadflax (Linaria purpurea) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Purple toadflax (Linaria purpurea)

Gooseneck loosestrife (Lysimachia clethroides): not something I'd let loose in the garden proper, but it's working out well planted in a tough spot out back with other thugs [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Gooseneck loosestrife (Lysimachia clethroides): not something I’d let loose in the garden proper, but it’s working out well planted in a tough spot out back with other thugs

'Raspberry Wine' bee balm (Monarda) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Raspberry Wine’ bee balm (Monarda)

Magic primrose (Oenothera glazioviana): the large flowers spiral open just before dark and are still open by dawn [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Magic primrose (Oenothera glazioviana): the large flowers spiral open just before dark and are still open by dawn

The main patch of prickly pear (Opuntia humifusa) outside my basement window is in full bloom and quite splendid, but I had to acknowledge this plucky little piece, which has been sitting loose on a nearby stepping stone for months. Notice the tiny root making its way out of the base in search of some soil. After shooting this picture, I moved the pad back to the loose gravel, and it seems quite happy to have a permanent home. [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

The main patch of prickly pear (Opuntia humifusa) outside my basement window is in full bloom and quite splendid, but I had to acknowledge this plucky little piece, which has been sitting loose on a nearby stepping stone for months. Notice the tiny root making its way out of the base in search of some soil. After shooting this picture, I moved the pad back to the loose gravel, and it seems quite happy to have a permanent home.

Wild quinine (Parthenium integrifolium) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Wild quinine (Parthenium integrifolium)

A garden phlox (Phlox paniculata) seedling with 'Purple Rain' salvia (Salvia verticillata), frost grass (Spodiopogon sibiricus), and asparagus (Asparagus officinalis) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

A garden phlox (Phlox paniculata) seedling with ‘Purple Rain’ salvia (Salvia verticillata), frost grass (Spodiopogon sibiricus), and asparagus (Asparagus officinalis)

False hemp (Datisca cannabina): male plant [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

False hemp (Datisca cannabina): male plant

Variegated pokeweed (Phytolacca americana 'Variegata', aka 'Silberstein'): a pity that it couldn't have put itself somewhere less inconvenient, but it's so handsome that I've not had the heart to try to remove it [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Variegated pokeweed (Phytolacca americana ‘Variegata’, aka ‘Silberstein’): a pity that it couldn’t have put itself somewhere less inconvenient, but it’s so handsome that I’ve not had the heart to try to remove it

Variegated pokeweed (Phytolacca americana 'Variegata', aka 'Silberstein') [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Variegated pokeweed (Phytolacca americana ‘Variegata’, aka ‘Silberstein’)

Japanese bottlebrush (Sanguisorba obtusa): my least favorite sanguisorba, because the flowering stems are sparsely produced and sprawly, but the individual blooms are really cute [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Japanese bottlebrush (Sanguisorba obtusa): my least favorite sanguisorba, because the flowering stems are sparsely produced and sprawly, but the individual blooms are really cute

Dark mullein (Verbascum nigrum) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Dark mullein (Verbascum nigrum)

'Governor George Aiken' mullein (Verbascum): fresh flowers open each morning through much of the summer [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Governor George Aiken’ mullein (Verbascum): fresh flowers open each morning through much of the summer

Culver's root (Veronicastrum virginicum) in front of 'Hakuro Nishiki' willow (Salix integra) [nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Culver’s root (Veronicastrum virginicum) in front of ‘Hakuro Nishiki’ willow (Salix integra)

It’s a little early for most grasses, but there are a few looking neat right now.

Bottlebrush grass (Elymus hystrix, formerly Hystrix patula) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Bottlebrush grass (Elymus hystrix, formerly Hystrix patula)

Quaking grass (Briza maxima) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Quaking grass (Briza maxima)

Sideoats grama (Bouteloua curtipendula) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Sideoats grama (Bouteloua curtipendula)

A few flower and foliage highlights on an herbal theme:

Creeping winter savory (Satureja montana ssp. illyrica) with variegated lemon thyme (Thymus x citriodorus 'Variegatus') [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Creeping winter savory (Satureja montana ssp. illyrica) with variegated lemon thyme (Thymus x citriodorus ‘Variegatus’)

Wall germander (Teucrium chamaedrys) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Wall germander (Teucrium chamaedrys)

Lavender cotton (Santolina chamaecyparissus) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Lavender cotton (Santolina chamaecyparissus)

'Variegated Berggarten' culinary sage (Salvia officinalis) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Variegated Berggarten’ culinary sage (Salvia officinalis)

Pine geranium (Pelargonium denticulatum) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Pine geranium (Pelargonium denticulatum)

'African Blue' basil (Ocimum) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘African Blue’ basil (Ocimum)

'Zloty Lan' German chamomile (Matricaria recutita) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Zloty Lan’ German chamomile (Matricaria recutita)

Aztec sweet herb (Lippia dulcis) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Aztec sweet herb (Lippia dulcis)

Platinum Blonde English lavender (Lavandula angustifolia 'Momparler') with 'Clear Gold' thyme (Thymus) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Platinum Blonde English lavender (Lavandula angustifolia ‘Momparler’) with ‘Clear Gold’ thyme (Thymus)

Some glorious summer bulbs include…

Gloriosa lily (Gloriosa superba): This is the first time I've grown this, but it won't be the last! It's been performing well in the container planting by the barn door. From the pictures I saw, I expected it to be red and yellow, but this one, at least seems to start out cream and pink, turning solid fuchsia pink as the flowers age. [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Gloriosa lily (Gloriosa superba): This is the first time I’ve grown this, but it won’t be the last! It’s been performing well in the container planting by the barn door. From the pictures I saw, I expected it to be red and yellow, but this one, at least, seems to start out cream and pink, turning solid rich pink as the flowers age.

Abyssinian gladiolus (Gladiolus murielae, formerly Acidanthera bicolor) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Abyssinian gladiolus (Gladiolus murielae, formerly Acidanthera bicolor)

This summer, I moved all of my post-bloom amaryllis (Hippeastrum) bulbs to one large container instead of leaving them in their individual pots. They're thriving in a sunny spot by the greenhouse and even producing new blooms. [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

This summer, I moved all of my post-bloom amaryllis (Hippeastrum) bulbs to one large container instead of leaving them in their individual pots. They’re thriving in a sunny spot by the greenhouse and even producing new blooms.

Drumstick allium (Allium sphaerocephalon) leaning on ghost bramble (Rubus thibetanus) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Drumstick allium (Allium sphaerocephalon) leaning on ghost bramble (Rubus thibetanus)

Star of Persia (Allium christophii) is just as handsome in seed as in flower. Here it's with 'Mercury Rising' coreopsis (Coreopsis), Phenomenal lavender (Lavandula x intermedia 'Niko'), and 'Color Guard' yucca (Yucca). To be perfectly honest, this combo is a bit staged, because the larger allium head was actually growing right in front of the yucca. But when the heads are dry like this, it's easy to cut them at ground level and move them around as you like! [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Star of Persia (Allium christophii) is just as handsome in seed as in flower. Here it’s with ‘Mercury Rising’ coreopsis (Coreopsis), Phenomenal lavender (Lavandula x intermedia ‘Niko’), and ‘Color Guard’ yucca (Yucca). To be perfectly honest, this combo is a bit staged, because the larger allium head was actually growing right in front of the yucca. But when the heads are dry like this, it’s easy to cut them at ground level and move them around as you like.

Then there are the lilies. I’m grateful that I haven’t yet had to deal with lily leaf beetle here, but deer have been making some forays into the garden this year.

The emerging buds of my beloved 'Freya' Longiflorum-Asiatic lily (Lilium) got chomped just as they emerged in spring, but they still managed to grow and bloom. [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

The emerging buds of my beloved ‘Freya’ Longiflorum-Asiatic lily (Lilium) got chomped just as they emerged in spring, but they still managed to grow and bloom.

It's a good thing I got this photo of Leichtlin's lily (Lilium leichtlinii) when I did, even though it wasn't in full flower. By the next morning, the deer had neatly nipped off all of the buds and blooms they missed the day before. [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

It’s a good thing I got this photo of Leichtlin’s lily (Lilium leichtlinii) when I did, even though it wasn’t in full flower. By the next morning, the deer had neatly nipped off all of the buds and blooms they missed the day before.

'Monte Negro' Asiatic lily (Lilium) growing in the same bed was spared, perhaps because the flowers were nestled into the 'Golden Foam' upright spurge (Euphorbia stricta). [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Monte Negro’ Asiatic lily (Lilium) growing in the same bed was spared, perhaps because the flowers were nestled into the ‘Golden Foam’ upright spurge (Euphorbia stricta).

'Forever Susan' Asiatic lily (Lilium) is one of my absolute favorite summer bloomers. Here it's in front of 'Isla Gold' tansy (Tanacetum vulgare) and 'Royal Purple' smoke bush (Cotinus coggygria). [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Forever Susan’ Asiatic lily (Lilium) is one of my absolute favorite summer bloomers. Here it’s in front of ‘Isla Gold’ tansy (Tanacetum vulgare) and ‘Royal Purple’ smoke bush (Cotinus coggygria).

Stout-stemmed 'Conca d'Or' Orienpet lily (Lilium) opened its first flower this week. [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Stout-stemmed ‘Conca d’Or’ Orienpet lily (Lilium) opened its first flower this week.

'Purple Prince' Orienpet lily (Lilium) is another midsummer beauty. [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Purple Prince’ Orienpet lily (Lilium) is another midsummer beauty.

'Robina' Orienpet lily (Lilium) is rich in both color and fragrance [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Robina’ Orienpet lily (Lilium) is rich in both color and fragrance.

A few vines that have really grown on me (sorry, couldn’t resist the pun)…

Most leaves of variegated cinnamon vine (Dioscorea batatas) are mainly green with just a bit of white or cream, but some of the younger foliage, in particular, can be quite showy. [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Most leaves of variegated cinnamon vine (Dioscorea batatas) are mainly green with just a bit of white or cream, but some of the younger foliage, in particular, can be quite showy.

Late Dutch honeysuckle (Lonicera periclymenum var. serotina) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Late Dutch honeysuckle (Lonicera periclymenum var. serotina)

To save space, I decided to shoot the leather flower-type clematis all together. From top to bottom: scarlet clematis (Clematis texensis), whiteleaf leather flower (C. glaucophylla), vasevine (C. viorna), and pale leather flower (C. versicolor). [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

To save space, I decided to shoot the leather flower-type clematis all together. From top to bottom: scarlet clematis (Clematis texensis), whiteleaf leather flower (C. glaucophylla), vasevine (C. viorna), and pale leather flower (C. versicolor).

Two more seed-grown clematis of uncertain ID. I just call them "viticella types." The flowers are small but abundant. [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Two more seed-grown clematis of uncertain ID. I just call them “viticella types.” The flowers are small but abundant.

Some wonderful woody plants that look lovely now:

Southern bush honeysuckle (Diervilla sessilifolia) with golden oregano (Origanum vulgare 'Aureum') and giant fleabane (Inula magnifica) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Southern bush honeysuckle (Diervilla sessilifolia) with golden oregano (Origanum vulgare ‘Aureum’) and giant fleabane (Inula magnifica)

Silverleaf hydrangea (Hydrangea arborescens subsp. radiata)[Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Silverleaf hydrangea (Hydrangea arborescens subsp. radiata)

Common buttonbush (Cephalanthus occidentalis) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Common buttonbush (Cephalanthus occidentalis)

Common buttonbush (Cephalanthus occidentalis) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Common buttonbush (Cephalanthus occidentalis)

Japanese stewartia (Stewartia pseudocamellia) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Japanese stewartia (Stewartia pseudocamellia)

'Red Majestic' contorted hazel (Corylus avellana)

‘Red Majestic’ contorted hazel (Corylus avellana): beautiful when backlit

Wow, look at the thorns on this hawthorn (Crataegus) seedling I planted out in the meadow years ago. No wonder the deer have left it alone. [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Wow, look at the thorns on this hawthorn (Crataegus) seedling I planted out in the meadow years ago. No wonder the deer have left it alone.

Another hawthorn (Crataegus) seedling I planted at the same time has not done nearly as well. I finally took a close look at it this year and finally determined that the problem is cedar-quince rust (Gymnosporangium clavipes). I knew about cedar-apple rust, but not cedar-quince rust. (There's also a cedar-hawthorn rust, but I don't think that's the problem here, even though this is a hawthorn.) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Another hawthorn (Crataegus) seedling I planted at the same time has not done nearly as well. I finally took a close look at it this year and am pretty sure that the problem is cedar-quince rust (Gymnosporangium clavipes). I knew about cedar-apple rust, but not cedar-quince rust. (There’s also a cedar-hawthorn rust, but I don’t think that’s the issue here, even though this is a hawthorn.)

When I was taking pictures of cedar-apple rust galls back in April, I also saw this orangey gloop. I figured it was just another symptom of that fungus, but when I was researching cedar-quince rust (Gymnosporangium clavipes), I discovered that this is what cedar-quince looks like on cedar (Juniperus virginiana). [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

When I was taking pictures of cedar-apple rust galls back in April, I also saw this orangey gloop. I figured it was just another symptom of that fungus, but when I was researching cedar-quince rust (Gymnosporangium clavipes), I discovered that this is what cedar-quince looks like on cedar (Juniperus virginiana).

While I was out wandering around my meadow, I decided it was a good time to take a ramble a bit farther afield (so to speak).

The first stop was our farm meadow right across the road. Even from eye level, it doesn't look like there's much of interest, but it rewards close inspection. [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

The first stop was our farm meadow right across the road. Even from eye level, it doesn’t look like there’s much of interest, but it rewards close inspection.

Helmet flower (Scutellaria integrifolia) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Helmet flower (Scutellaria integrifolia)

Whorled yellow loosestrife (Lysimachia quadrifolia) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Whorled yellow loosestrife (Lysimachia quadrifolia)

Wild garlic (Allium vineale) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Wild garlic (Allium vineale)

White avens (Geum canadense) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

White avens (Geum canadense)

Narrowleaf mountain mint (Pycnanthemum tenuifolium) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Narrowleaf mountain mint (Pycnanthemum tenuifolium)

Ragged fringed orchid (Platanthera lacera) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Ragged fringed orchid (Platanthera lacera)

Nearby meadows look equally unpromising but yield some nice finds. [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Nearby meadows look equally unpromising but yield some nice finds.

Hop sedge (Carex lupulina) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Hop sedge (Carex lupulina)

Black-eyed Susan (Rudbeckia hirta) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Black-eyed Susan (Rudbeckia hirta)

Sulphur cinquefoil (Potentilla recta) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Sulphur cinquefoil (Potentilla recta)

Pale-spike lobelia (Lobelia spicata) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Pale-spike lobelia (Lobelia spicata)

Butter-and-eggs or yellow toadflax (Linaria vulgaris) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Butter-and-eggs or yellow toadflax (Linaria vulgaris)

Perforate St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Perforate St. John’s wort (Hypericum perforatum)

A pretty pink-tinged Queen Anne's lace (Daucus carota var. carota) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

A pretty pink-tinged Queen Anne’s lace (Daucus carota var. carota)

Midsummmer is a great time for hunting milkweeds. In just one field, I can find several species, including…

Common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca)

Swamp milkweed (Asclepias incarnata) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Swamp milkweed (Asclepias incarnata)

Butterfly weed (Asclepias tuberosa) with a pearl crescent (or maybe a northern crescent?) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Butterfly weed (Asclepias tuberosa) with a pearl crescent (or maybe a northern crescent?)

Allegheny blackberry (Rubus allegheniensis) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Allegheny blackberry (Rubus allegheniensis)

Wineberry (Rubus phoenicolasius) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Wineberry (Rubus phoenicolasius)

Pennsylvania sedge (Carex pensylvanica) making a lovely natural groundcover in these Pennsylvania woods [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Pennsylvania sedge (Carex pensylvanica) making a lovely natural groundcover in these Pennsylvania woods

This unassuming little plant goes by the charming common name of enchanter's nightshade (Circaea lutetiana). It looks dainty and innocent in the woods, but ugh, some of it ended up in my garden somehow, and it's an aggressive spreader there. [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

This unassuming little plant goes by the charming common name of enchanter’s nightshade (Circaea lutetiana). It looks dainty and innocent in the woods, but ugh, some of it ended up in my garden somehow, and it’s an aggressive spreader there.

White coral fungus (Clavulina cristata) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

White coral fungus (Clavulina cristata)

It's easy to find the ramps (Allium tricoccum) this time of year, when they're in bloom. [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

It’s easy to find the ramps (Allium tricoccum) this time of year, when they’re in bloom.

The foliage of the ramps (Allium tricoccum) went dormant a month or so ago, but other green leaves make a nice complement to its white flowers. [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

The foliage of the ramps (Allium tricoccum) went dormant a month or so ago, but other green leaves make a nice complement to its white flowers.

To finish, let’s head back home for some general garden shots.

A path in The Shrubbery, lined with southern bush honeysuckle (Diervilla sessilifolia) and 'Dart's Golden' ninebark (Physocarpus opulifolius) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

A path in The Shrubbery, lined with southern bush honeysuckle (Diervilla sessilifolia) and ‘Dart’s Golden’ ninebark (Physocarpus opulifolius)

Well, this was a surprise. I started "Digitalis grandiflora" seed a couple years ago, thinking it would be charming to have the low yellow spikes to line this path. When they flowered this year, they turned out to be rusty foxglove (Digitalis ferruginea). They're much taller than I'd envisioned, but otherwise I'm fine with them: the soft orange color is nice, and the flowers are so narrowly upright that they don't block the path. [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Well, this was a surprise. I started “Digitalis grandiflora” seed a couple years ago, thinking it would be charming to have the low yellow spikes to line this path. When they flowered this year, they turned out to be rusty foxglove (Digitalis ferruginea). They’re much taller than I’d envisioned, but otherwise I’m fine with them: the soft orange color is nice, and the flowers are so narrowly upright that they don’t block the path.

Rusty foxglove (Digitalis ferruginea) and drumstick allium (Allium sphaerocephalon) in the side garden [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Rusty foxglove (Digitalis ferruginea) and drumstick allium (Allium sphaerocephalon) in the side garden

I finally got the last decaying cedar arbor taken down in courtyard. I couldn't find an affordable new arbor big enough to replace it with, so I ended up using one of the old arches from the side garden flanked by two panels I salvaged from the cedar arbor. [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

I finally got the last decaying cedar arbor taken down in courtyard. I couldn’t find an affordable new arbor big enough to replace it with, so I ended up using one of the old arches from the side garden flanked by two panels I salvaged from the cedar arbor.

A front-garden vignette with Mellow Yellow spirea (Spiraea thunbergii 'Ogon'), 'Mardi Gras' helenium (Helenium), 'Nona's Garnet Spider' daylily (Hemerocallis), 'Lucifer' crocosmia (Crocosmia), 'Royal Purple' smoke bush (Cotinus coggygria), Diabolo ninebark (Physocarpus opulifolius 'Monlo'), 'Prairie Sunset' oxeye (Heliopsis helianthoides), and Japanese burnet (Sanguisorba tenuifolia) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

A front-garden vignette with Mellow Yellow spirea (Spiraea thunbergii ‘Ogon’), ‘Mardi Gras’ helenium (Helenium), ‘Nona’s Garnet Spider’ daylily (Hemerocallis), ‘Lucifer’ crocosmia (Crocosmia), ‘Royal Purple’ smoke bush (Cotinus coggygria), Diabolo ninebark (Physocarpus opulifolius ‘Monlo’), ‘Prairie Sunset’ oxeye (Heliopsis helianthoides), and Japanese burnet (Sanguisorba tenuifolia)

Purple coneflowers (Echinacea purpurea) in the TDF border [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Purple coneflowers (Echinacea purpurea) in the TDF border

If you made it this far…thanks so much for reading. See you again next month! In the meantime, I’ll be busy deadheading the daylilies to keep Duncan supplied with his daily dose of yummy flowers.

Duncan the alpaca snacking on daylilies [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Mmmm…daylilies are delicious!

If you’d like to enjoy more summery garden goodness, check out the list of this month’s GBBD participants in Carol’s main Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day post at May Dreams Gardens.

 

26 responses to this post.

  1. Posted by Verna Colliver on July 15, 2017 at 7:46 am

    So much beauty and variety in your garden–it’s a wonderful way to start my day! Your photo of toadflax looks like what I call snapdragon? Are they similar?
    Lilies seem to be quite popular this year. I see them blooming luxuriantly around the retirement community where I live.
    Thank you!

    A very good morning to you! Yes, the toadflaxes (Linaria) and snapdragons (Antirrhinum) are closely related. And you’re right, both the true lilies and daylilies are putting on a splendid show in our part of PA this summer–as long as there are no deer around. May you continue to enjoy their beautiful blooms!
    -Nan

    Reply

  2. Posted by Lorraine Wallace on July 15, 2017 at 7:52 am

    Nancy, this is one of your most beautiful and informative posts ever! The close ups are absolutely gorgeous….do you have a new camera? You’ve introduced me to so many plants I never heard of or have never seen before, other than on the HPS seed exchange list. So many of the plants are what I would call “subtle” in bloom and would normally overlook. But your eye for beauty has opened mine. And I love the way you ID everything with both the common and Latin name. Do you know all these or do you have to research some?
    Thank you so much! You are a gardener’s treasure.

    You’re so kind, Lorraine; thank you. The post ended up being so long that I figured it might try the patience of most readers, but it’s hard to leave things out! Nope, not a new camera, just lovely plants and lovely light. I wish I did simply know all of these plants, but it’s getting harder to keep them all straight. When I add tags to the images before I archive them, I frequently have to refer back to already-tagged images, or to my seed-order lists.
    -Nan

    Reply

  3. Posted by Lisa at Greenbow on July 15, 2017 at 8:20 am

    What a delight to come upon your monthly post of blooms this morning. I like the over-all shots of the garden as well as the close ups. I love the close ups too. I like to see the variegation of blooms and leaves. Well just everything. I think about comments I would like to make about certain flowers yet by the time I get down here to actually say something my mind is boggled by the beauty and number of fantastic specimens that I can’t formulate what to say. Your garden is always an inspiration and riles up a plant lust in me that can’t be ignored. Cheers and Happy GBBD.

    Hey there, Lisa. I’m not surprised you forgot what you wanted to say by the time you made it to the end; this was a big one. I always appreciate you taking the time to stop by and check in!
    -Nan

    Reply

  4. A good summer for bloom here in central Virginia too. You can’t show enough lilies for me, of course. Mine were spectacular all through June, but a bit of a hiatus now until the very late ones that I hope to save from the deer. Saw a doe with her spotted fawn standing in the middle of a suburban street yesterday. Probably casing the joint for lily buds.

    Oh dear, Marcia. Or rather, oh deer! I’m sure you’re right: They’re scoping out the buffet bar before they decide where to start. Sigh. Well, let’s hope they leave you something to enjoy this summer!
    -Nan

    Reply

  5. Posted by Amy Kennedy on July 15, 2017 at 9:38 am

    Geum canadense! Been trying to identify this in my own garden for some time. Your posts are not only beautiful and inspirational, but so educational!

    You too, huh? I used to leave the plants in my garden because the basal foliage was interesting but never noticed them in bloom, just the seedheads. Once I found it in the meadows, I finally took the time to identify it. I’m glad I could help!
    -Nan

    Reply

  6. Posted by Alana on July 15, 2017 at 10:15 am

    The most beautiful post yet. So many old favorites shown to perfection and new-to-me plants to look forward to growing are inspiring me for next year.

    Aw, thanks so much, Alana. Each time I start thinking about Bloom Day, I wonder if I’ll have enough interesting stuff to show. Things certainly worked out this time. I hope you have a great weekend!
    -Nan

    Reply

  7. Posted by Paula Majhan on July 15, 2017 at 10:50 am

    This year I have pulled out a new plant from one of my garden beds, enchanter’s nightshade. I had no idea what it was but I was pretty sure it did not belong there. So, out it went! This is the first year that I noticed it flourishing in the garden. Thanks for the ID.
    You have such unusual plants and I look forward to you sharing the beautiful pictures. I just have to find “Forever Susan” Asiatic Lily, since my daughter’s name is Susan.

    I made the mistake of leaving the enchanter’s nightshade in my garden for maybe two years, first because I didn’t recognize the foliage and then because it was growing around the base of a rugosa rose, so reaching in to get it out was very unpleasant. Seeing as how it grows pretty sparsely in the woods, I wasn’t worried. But once I saw how fast it spread, I decided to remove all shoots as soon as I see them. Still, I have a feeling I’ll be dealing with it for years to come. I hope you have better luck controlling it. And yes, do add some ‘Forever Susan’ lilies to your garden; you won’t regret it. You know how it’s so easy to fall in love with a catalog photo and then be disappointed when you see the flowers in your own garden? This one has never failed to please me, and I’m sure you’ll love it too. It’s a worthy tribute to Susans everywhere!
    -Nan

    Reply

  8. Posted by Deirdre Greeley on July 15, 2017 at 11:03 am

    I always look forward to your posts! You are such a gifted photographer, horticulturist, designer. Thank you for sharing and educating us.

    It’s so nice of you to say that, Dee. Thank you for taking the time to visit today. I wish you a wonderful Bloom Day in your own garden!
    -Nan

    Reply

  9. You have so many wonderful flowers what a fantastic selection! I kept thinking that there couldn’t be more, but they just kept coming. Your garden must be the perfect place to be at the moment.

    Hi there, Pauline. I always think of fall as the best time in the garden, but even summer offers a bountiful supply of blooms. Could have something to do with this year’s regular rainfall too. All the best to you!
    -Nan

    Reply

  10. Posted by Gabriella on July 15, 2017 at 4:42 pm

    What a treat it is to read your posts. I’m away from my Virginia garden for the summer, working on dissertation research up in hot and dry Montana. Seeing your pictures are a balm for the soul!

    How exciting for you, Gabriella! Best of luck to you with your research. It’s sad that you have to miss the whole summer in your garden, though. I’m glad I was able to show you a bit of East Coast greenery today.
    -Nan

    Reply

  11. Your garden has really made up for lost time after its somewhat slow start this past spring! I couldn’t even begin to list all the plants that had me oohing and aahing – I’d just have to say “all of the above” (except for those afflicted by Japanese beetles and cedar rust, of course). Although, I was very taken with the Nigellas ‘Cramer’s Plum’ (worth growing for the seedpods alone) and ‘Transformer’, as well as Elymus hystrix. I can’t think of a better use for spent daylily blooms either. Hpaay GBBD, Nan!

    Are you *sure* you don’t envy us those pretty beetles? They’re all metallic and shiny, and multiply readily. Or…maybe not. I should have taken a better shot of the ‘Cramers’ Plum’ seedpods, but I was in a bit of a hurry. I wanted to show them because people wonder why ‘Cramers’ Plum’ nigella has white flowers; they reasonably expect purple blooms rather than purple pods. I like that you appreciated the Elymus hystrix too; it’s a native for us and is abundant on the roadsides in our neighborhood. Thanks for visiting, Kris!
    -Nan

    Reply

  12. Posted by Ann Evans on July 15, 2017 at 6:14 pm

    For nearly 50 years I’ve been gardening and thanks to you, Nan, I keep learning about so many new plants that I’ve never heard of before. Thank you for these sessions!
    My two favorites today: Gloriosa Superba lily and the Dioscorea Batatas vine, both just beautiful. Today when I was attending a garden walk a gardener mentioned to me that she had been given seeds for a vine called White Lace Vine (not silver lace vine). She said she thought it was perennial. Are you familiar with it?

    That is a wonderful compliment, Ann; thank you! I have to admit that I don’t know about “white lace vine”; I would indeed have assumed you meant silver lace vine. I wonder if it might be white coral vine (Antigonon leptopus ‘Album’)? I think that’s tropical, though.
    -Nan

    Reply

  13. Posted by Nell on July 15, 2017 at 6:24 pm

    Have been thinking about adding some Filipendula to a “meadow-ette” here; hadn’t really considered fragrance (failed to pick up on the hint in the common name). What does the scent resemble? Did you plant from seed and get both pink and white forms, or acquire them as plants with known color? I’m not eager to put much pink into the meadow-ette…

    Love love love the sentinels of rusty foxglove guarding the path.

    Hmmm…I don’t know as I can say the scent of Filipendula ulmaria resembles another plant. Sort of sweet , yes, but also herbal, in a way. When Rob Cardillo was here once, I remember him saying that it smelled like some sort of first-aid cream. Oh, hooray for Google…apparently the name of the stuff is Germolene. I’ve never smelled that myself, so I can’t make the comparison. If you want fragrant white flowers, make sure you get Filipendula ulmaria or one of its cultivars. The pink is Filipendula rubra, and it’s easily 6 to 8 feet tall, compared to F. ulmaria’s 3 to 4 feet. I originally started with Filipendula ulmaria ‘Aurea’ and ‘Variegata’. ‘Aurea’ still has yellow leaves, but ‘Variegata’ reverted, which is how I have the plain green-leaved species now.
    -Nan

    Reply

  14. Amazing that the rusty foxglove was an inadvertent surprise. I must try again. I know I can always get my herbaceous fix here, and July certainly didn’t disappoint. Thanks, Nan!

    Yeah, you just never know with seeds. I ought to have noticed the difference in the leaves sooner, I suppose. But I wouldn’t trade for the yellow now; I really do like the rusty foxgloves. Thanks for stopping by today, Denise; it’s always nice to hear from you!
    -Nan

    Reply

  15. Posted by Barthelemy Christine on July 16, 2017 at 5:48 am

    Bonjour, je suis votre blog sans jamais mettre un commentaire mais aujourd’hui j’ose vous demander si vous savez ou je pourrais me procurer des graines du Platycodon Axminster streaked car je le trouve superbe mais il est inconnu en France.
    Continuez à nous faire rêver en regardant votre jardin. Amicalement.
    Christine B

    Thank you for visiting, Christine. I’m sorry to admit that I can’t read your comment, but I hope you enjoyed your visit.
    -Nan

    Reply

    • Posted by Barthelemy Christine on July 20, 2017 at 7:30 am

      I said, can you tell me where I could fond seeds of platycodon axminster streaked, I love this plant formidable but it’s impossible to find them in France.
      Thank you for your photography. sorry for my english.

      Thank you, Christine. Sadly, I don’t know of any seed companies that currently offer this beautiful perennial. I may have seeds available this fall, though, if my plants are not damaged by weather or eaten by deer.
      -Nan

      Reply

  16. I like Duncan best of all! Thanks for sharing. It was so pleasant visiting.
    Happy Bloom Day!
    Jeannie @ GetMeToTheCountry.Blogspot.com

    He’s my favorite thing too, Jeannie. Thanks so much for reading and commenting!
    -Nan

    Reply

    • Do tell Duncan the dayliles are best sauted in a little butter.

      Hah – he paces at the gate when he sees me deadheading the daylilies, so he’d probably be pretty peeved if I made him wait even longer!
      -Nan

      Reply

  17. I’ll be coming back to this post a few times to get the full effect, wow!
    The foxgloves are cool and I’m excited to see them growing since I started a few different kinds this spring including the rusty foxglove. I can easily see you thinking you had grandiflora though, since all the ones I have right now look identical. I hope they’re not all the same!
    Big news. You sent me eucomis ‘ex Oakhurst’ (I think) seeds a few years ago. I’ve been nursing the lone survivor for years and just last week noticed the beginnings of what I hope is a flower. Yay and thanks again!
    Also thanks for the Gardens North verbascum link. I’m nearly positive I checked last month and only saw two or three different species, now there are several and they all sound better than the last! I would love to have a verbascum patch, I think they’re awesome.
    Love the pokeweed, The only way I ever manage to get them to look like that is when they seed themselves out into a vegetable bed or somewhere else I’d rather they didn’t grow. But yours is amazing!
    Sorry to hear that the deer are making a habit of coming around. I dread the day that happens here, and will probably put up a fence…

    It’s hard to imagine having too many foxgloves, so I guess we just enjoy whatever we get. What wonderful news about the Eucomis. A gold star to you for nurturing it from seed to flowering! It’s a bit disappointing, isn’t it, that Gardens North is closed until September? I am keeping a running list of things I want to order as soon as they start selling again. And yes, I have the same experience with pokeweeds: They rarely thrive when I try to place them but are gorgeous when self-sown. That’s why that huge clump is right in front of the shed doors. It’s a bear trying to get my brush mower in and out, but the pokeweed is too gorgeous to cut down. Of course, I could probably run the brush mower right over it and it would still come back! And the deer…well, I guess I was lucky to get through over 15 years without a big problem, but I suppose my luck has run out. It’s always something, you know?
    -Nan

    Reply

  18. Posted by Nono on July 17, 2017 at 2:39 pm

    Hello Nancy, thanks for your beautiful post ! I like all your pictures !
    In my garden , I have a plant which I don’t know the name. I think it’s the teucrium chamaedrys which you photographed in your garden.
    I search also your books translated in French, and I found only one of them. It’s ‘Five plants garden’. I will buy it for my Christmas.
    I would also buy your book “Perrenial machmaker”. It’s not translated in French, but I think I can read it with the latin’s name of the plants.
    Sorry, I hope you understand a little my english ! Because I am french, so my english is not very well, I think !
    And thanks you again Nan ! Your garden is very, very beautiful !

    Hello Nono! It’s lovely to hear from you again. There’s no need to apologize, my dear: Your English is far better than my very limited French. I do have one other book translated into French: Grasses (or for you, Graminées). And yes, the combination photos in The Perennial Matchmaker are labeled with botanical names, so you should have no trouble using it. I send my best wishes to you and your garden!
    -Nan

    Reply

  19. Posted by Nono on July 18, 2017 at 9:24 am

    Hello Nan, thanks for your reply. So, I decided : I’ll buy Five plants garden in French, and Perennial Matchmaker in English.
    It’s right : there is also your book Grasses translated in French. I know why I didn’t note it : I like grasses, I sometimes buy any, but a lot of them re-seed everywhere in the garden. I have one like that, a Carex variety, which seeded between all my plants. It was already in the garden when I bought the house.
    I wish you a very good day.

    I hope you enjoy both books, Nono. I understand your concern about self-sowing grasses and sedges, though there are many beautiful kinds that are well-behaved too.
    -Nan

    Reply

  20. Posted by JessB on July 19, 2017 at 10:30 am

    Gorgeous as always! The variegated sage reminded me how pretty it can be. Need to get some.

    Thanks, Jess. Yes, isn’t that ‘Variegated Berggarten’ sage gorgeous? I was a little disappointed at first that the leaves themselves don’t look like those of regular ‘Berggarten’, but apparently it was a sport that arose on a plant of ‘Berggarten’, hence the name. The bold, crisp variegation is spectacular, by any name. A Google search should bring up a few online sources if you can’t find it locally.
    -Nan

    Reply

  21. Posted by M E Cheshier on July 22, 2017 at 11:30 am

    What a fabulous post! I love your great abundance of flowers.

    Thanks for visiting! Happy Bloom Day to you!
    -Nan

    Reply

  22. Posted by Nancy Winiecki on July 22, 2017 at 6:13 pm

    Your garden is spectacular as usual, Nan! I have Enchanter’s Nightshade as a native ephemeral groundcover in my woods, along with Pacific Waterleaf and others, and I always thought it was very cute, though it doesn’t seem to spread into any of my beds. I was amused to see it labeled as Garlic Mustard at a weed control booth once. Here it rained daily for all of spring so my weeds are incredible this year, so I much appreciate the geraniums and plants that spread well to make a ground cover the weed grasses can’t invade easily. I am not blogging at present but enjoy seeing your wide variety of blooms and foliage. It’s so funny that Duncan loves daylilies. The deer here don’t eat them, but like roses. I have eaten daylilies in salads, some taste better than others. I’ve had to back off on my flower starts to be able to take care of my vegetable beds, I am now getting 6-8 lb. Cocozelle zucchinis. So I enjoyed all your exciting flowers!

    Hi Nancy! I agree that enchanter’s nightshade is fine in woodland areas; I just never expected it to be an aggressive spreader in looser garden soil. (Misidentified as garlic mustard? Oh my!) Isn’t it interesting how deer in different areas have different favorites? My very best to you and your garden!
    -Nan

    Reply

  23. Nan, what a fabulous bloom day you’re having this summer. I missed bloom day entirely, and I’ve been spending a lot of time in my veggie garden this summer. We got enough rain in Spring to help the plants through our abysmal heat. I also grow Forever Susan, and I love it too. I didn’t think about putting it in front of purple smokebush. What a grand idea. If I move some and photograph it, I’ll give you credit for the idea. Thanks! Mine are in front of Royal Sunset Easter-Asiatic lily right now. Of course, all of my EAs and As bloomed months ago. I loved seeing yours. I’m so sorry about the Japanese beetles. We get them occasionally here, and I hate them. They are horrid creatures. Do you pick them off, or what? I squish the ones I see, and I didn’t see any this year. On that note, I’m not seeing very many insects at all. Just starting to see a few butterflies although the pollinator buffet has been up and running for a while. Happy Bloom Day.~~Dee

    Hi there, Dee! Good to hear from you. You have your own challenges, so I hope the Japanese beetles don’t bug you too much. I don’t do anything to or about them; some years they are bad and some years they aren’t. It’s odd that you’re not seeing many insects in general. I’d be glad to send you a nice assortment. Lots of butterflies here, which is nice, but also more ants than I’ve ever seen; ick.
    -Nan

    Reply

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