Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day – June 2017

No excuses this month! There are plenty of blooms to show for this Bloom Day. In fact, it looks like we’re right where we should be compared to other years, even with the cool, cloudy, and rainy weather we’ve enjoyed over the last month. Just last week, we were still having nights in the low 40s and days in the 60s; a few days ago, we jumped to the 90s. That’s not so good for the gardener but very good for the garden–at least for the basil, squash, beans, cotton, and other heat-loving plants.

There’s so much good stuff going on that I limited my photo selections to just the past 2 weeks, and I left out several things I’d planned on mentioning. But there is still lots to show, so let’s get to it.

The sudden heat has brought a sudden stop to most of the irises, but they were lovely while they lasted.

Dutch iris 'Lion King' with purple-leaved plantain (Plantago major 'Atropurpurea') and Euphorbia nicaeensis [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Dutch iris ‘Lion King’ with purple-leaved plantain (Plantago major ‘Atropurpurea’) and Euphorbia nicaeensis

Hybrid bearded iris 'Edith Wolford' [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Hybrid bearded iris ‘Edith Wolford’

Hybrid bearded iris 'Beverly Sills' with 'Walker's Low' catmint (Nepeta) and fringecups (Tellima grandiflora) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Hybrid bearded iris ‘Beverly Sills’ with ‘Walker’s Low’ catmint (Nepeta) and fringecups (Tellima grandiflora)

Hybrid bearded iris 'Clarence' with 'Walker's Low' catmint (Nepeta) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Hybrid bearded iris ‘Clarence’ with ‘Walker’s Low’ catmint (Nepeta)

'Butter and Sugar' Siberian iris (Iris sibirica) with Willow-leaved bluestar (Amsonia tabernaemontana) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Butter and Sugar’ Siberian iris (Iris sibirica) with willow-leaved bluestar (Amsonia tabernaemontana)

That photo reminds me: Has anyone else noticed their amsonias flowering twice this year? It’s a first time for me; something to do with our unusual weather, I guess.

Anyway, there’s no shortage of other perennials gracing the garden right now.

Star of Persia (Allium christophii) with 'Color Guard' yucca (Yucca filamentosa) and Dianthus cruentus [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Star of Persia (Allium christophii) with ‘Color Guard’ yucca (Yucca filamentosa) and Dianthus cruentus

'Mount Everest' ornamental onion (Allium) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Mount Everest’ ornamental onion (Allium)

Sicilian honey garlic (Nectaroscordum siculum, aka Allium siculum) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Sicilian honey garlic (Nectaroscordum siculum, aka Allium siculum)

'Black Barlow' columbine (Aquilegia) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Black Barlow’ columbine (Aquilegia)

Dutchman's pipe (Aristolochia macrophylla) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Dutchman’s pipe (Aristolochia macrophylla)

King's spear (Asphodeline lutea) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

King’s spear (Asphodeline lutea)

Blue false indigo (Baptisia australis) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Blue false indigo (Baptisia australis)

Common valerian (Valeriana officinalis) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Common valerian (Valeriana officinalis)

Red valerian (Centranthus ruber) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Red valerian (Centranthus ruber)

Serious Black bush clematis (Clematis recta 'Lime Close') [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Serious Black bush clematis (Clematis recta ‘Lime Close’)

Flowering here for the first time: cruel plant (Cynanchum ascyrifolium). Thanks to Kathy Purdy of Cold Climate Gardening for sharing this little-known perennial! [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Flowering here for the first time: cruel plant (Cynanchum ascyrifolium). Thanks to Kathy Purdy of Cold Climate Gardening for sharing this little-known perennial!

Another new addition for this year: 'Masterpiece' candytuft (Iberis). It's supposed to be perennial, and to flower from May until October. We'll see. I can say that it has been flowering for 6 weeks now, which is longer than regular perennial candytuft, but it's a long time until fall. [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Another new addition for this year: ‘Masterpiece’ candytuft (Iberis). It’s supposed to be perennial, and to flower from May until October. We’ll see. I can say that it has been flowering for 6 weeks now, which is longer than regular perennial candytuft, but it’s a long time until fall.

Yet another first-time bloomer, this one grown from seed shared by Rossana Raballo of Vivaio Millefoglie: Cambridge milk parsley (Selinum carvifolium, aka S. carvifolia) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Yet another first-time bloomer, this one grown from seed shared by Rossana Raballo of Vivaio Millefoglie: Cambridge milk parsley (Selinum carvifolium, aka S. carvifolia)

Dwarf culinary sage (Salvia officinalis 'Nana'). I know this isn't all that special, but I think it's the first time I've had culinary sage bloom here. I generally have to grow it as an annual because the plants almost always succumb to our winter wet, but I overwintered it in the basement and replanted it in April. So, it's kind of cheating, but it's in bloom, so it still counts. [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Dwarf culinary sage (Salvia officinalis ‘Nana’). I know this isn’t all that special, but I think it’s the first time I’ve had culinary sage bloom here. I generally have to grow it as an annual because the plants almost always succumb to our winter wet, but I overwintered it in the basement and replanted it in April. So, it’s kind of cheating, but it’s in bloom, so it still counts.

'Caradonna' perennial sage (Salvia) with 'Dali Marble' burnet (Sanguisorba) and white-variegated sweet iris (Iris pallida 'Argentea Variegata') [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Caradonna’ perennial sage (Salvia) with ‘Dali Marble’ burnet (Sanguisorba) and white-variegated sweet iris (Iris pallida ‘Argentea Variegata’)

Creeping bramble (Rubus pentalobus, aka R. calycinoides) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Creeping bramble (Rubus pentalobus, aka R. calycinoides)

Caucasian crosswort (Phuopsis stylosa) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Caucasian crosswort (Phuopsis stylosa)

Tuberous-rooted Jerusalem sage (Phlomis tuberosa) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Tuberous-rooted Jerusalem sage (Phlomis tuberosa)

'Gold Foil' foxglove penstemon (Penstemon digitalis) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Gold Foil’ foxglove penstemon (Penstemon digitalis)

Giant starflower (Ornithogalum magnum) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Giant starflower (Ornithogalum magnum)

'Purple Haze' catmint (Nepeta) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Purple Haze’ catmint (Nepeta)

Maltese cross (Lychnis chalcedonica) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

One of the few hot-color flowers blooming here now: Maltese cross (Lychnis chalcedonica)

'Lollypop' Asiatic lily (Lilium) with Euphorbia palustris 'Zauberflote' [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Lollypop’ Asiatic lily (Lilium) with Euphorbia palustris ‘Zauberflote’

Purple toadflax (Linaria purpurea) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Purple toadflax (Linaria purpurea)

Some annuals are also contributing to the wealth of blooms this month.

'Northern Lights' Moroccan toadflax (Linaria maroccana): much shorter than the perennial purple toadflax, in a range of delicate colors [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Northern Lights’ Moroccan toadflax (Linaria maroccana): much shorter than the perennial purple toadflax, in a range of delicate colors

'Cramers' Plum' love-in-a-mist (Nigella damascena) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Cramers’ Plum’ love-in-a-mist (Nigella damascena)

White lace flower (Orlaya grandiflora): an innocent-looking beauty with a strong will to reproduce. It requires ruthless deadheading to keep it from seeding aggressively. [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

White lace flower (Orlaya grandiflora): an innocent-looking beauty with a strong will to reproduce. It requires ruthless deadheading to keep it from seeding aggressively.

I find that annual poppies that self-sow always are more vigorous than those I try to start. But wow, this patch of 'Drama Queen' really outdid itself. [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

I find that annual poppies that self-sow always are more vigorous than those I try to start. But wow, this patch of ‘Drama Queen’ really outdid itself.

Just look at that lovely fringe (Papaver 'Drama Queen') [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Just look at that lovely fringe.

Backlighting really brings out this poppy's red petal tips. 'Drama Queen' is certainly well named! [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Backlighting really brings out this poppy’s red petal tips. ‘Drama Queen’ is certainly well named!

Sweet William catchfly (Silene armeria) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Sweet William catchfly (Silene armeria)

After several unsuccessful attempts in the past, I finally had luck getting mignonette (Reseda odorata) to flowering stage this year. As with many scented flowers, descriptions of its fragrance vary widely. To me, they smell exactly like Dr. Pepper (that's a soft drink, for those of you outside of the U.S.). [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

After several unsuccessful attempts in the past, I finally had luck getting mignonette (Reseda odorata) to flowering stage this year. As with many scented flowers, descriptions of its fragrance vary widely. To me, they smell exactly like Dr. Pepper (that’s a soft drink, for those of you outside of the U.S.).

Hare's ear (Bupleurum rotundifolium) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Hare’s ear (Bupleurum rotundifolium)

The first flower on canary creeper (Tropaeolum peregrinum) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

The first flower on canary creeper (Tropaeolum peregrinum)

It’s been a surprisingly good year for the garden roses. I’ve lost so many to rose rosette disease over the years that it surprises me to see any still around, but a few lingering plants really performed well this year.

'Frau Dagmar'--or 'Frau Dagmar Hastrup', or 'Frau Dagmar Hartopp', or 'Fru Dagmar Hastrup', or 'Dagmar Hastrup'--rugosa rose (Rosa rugosa): by any name, she's been a dependable beauty for flowers, fruits, and foliage [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Frau Dagmar’–or ‘Frau Dagmar Hastrup’, or ‘Frau Dagmar Hartopp’, or ‘Fru Dagmar Hastrup’, or ‘Dagmar Hastrup’–rugosa rose (Rosa rugosa): by any name, she’s been a dependable beauty for flowers, fruits, and foliage

'Belle de Crecy' Gallica rose: richly perfumed and packed with petals that dry well for potpourri [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Belle de Crecy’ Gallica rose: richly perfumed and packed with petals that dry well for potpourri

Flowering for the first time in over a decade: the Gallica rose 'La Belle Sultane'. The poor thing has been popping up here and there in the Happy Garden but apparently never got enough sun until I cut down the big winter honeysuckle (Lonicera fragrantissima) clump that was growing nearby. [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Flowering for the first time in over a decade: the Gallica rose ‘La Belle Sultane’. The poor thing has been popping up here and there in the Happy Garden for many years but apparently never got enough sun until I cut down the big winter honeysuckle (Lonicera fragrantissima) clump that was growing nearby.

Rosa achburensis flowers for a very short time--usually just a week or two--but it puts on a great show of abundant, brightly colored hips in fall. [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Rosa achburensis flowers for a very short time–usually just a week or two–but it puts on a great show of abundant, brightly colored hips in fall.

Other flowering shrubs are kind of in a lull at the moment, but ninebark (Physocarpus opulifolius) always puts on a nice show if I haven’t cut it to the ground in spring.

'Dart's Gold' ninebark (Physocarpus opulifolius) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Dart’s Gold’ ninebark (Physocarpus opulifolius) in flower

'Dart's Gold' ninebark seedheads (Physocarpus opulifolius) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Dart’s Gold’ ninebark (Physocarpus opulifolius)–even showier in seed

If we’re going to enjoy features beyond flowers, then this is the place to slip in a few more seed, fruit, and foliage favorites.

Dyer's woad (Isatis tinctoria) in seed [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Dyer’s woad (Isatis tinctoria) in seed

'White Pine' strawberries (aka pineberries) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘White Pine’ strawberries (aka pineberries)

Variegated barley (Hordeum vulgare 'Variegatum') [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Variegated barley (Hordeum vulgare ‘Variegatum’)

Golden catalpa (Catalpa bignonioides 'Aurea') [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Golden catalpa (Catalpa bignonioides ‘Aurea’)

Golden full moon maple (Acer shirasawanum 'Aureum') [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Golden full moon maple (Acer shirasawanum ‘Aureum’)

'Berggarten Variegated' culinary sage (Salvia officinalis) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Berggarten Variegated’ culinary sage (Salvia officinalis)

Variegated rue (Ruta graveolens 'Variegata', aka 'Harlequin') [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Variegated rue (Ruta graveolens ‘Variegata’, aka ‘Harlequin’)

'Goldenvale' ghost bramble (Rubus cockburnianus; aka 'Golden Vale' or 'Aureus') [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Goldenvale’ ghost bramble (Rubus cockburnianus; aka ‘Golden Vale’ or ‘Aureus’)

A few combination shots…

'White Nancy' spotted deadnettle (Lamium maculatum) with 'Pewter Lace' painted fern (Athyrium niponicum)[Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘White Nancy’ spotted deadnettle (Lamium maculatum) with ‘Pewter Lace’ painted fern (Athyrium niponicum)

Euphorbia palustris 'Zauberflote' with 'Angelina' sedum (Sedum rupestre) [nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Euphorbia palustris ‘Zauberflote’ with ‘Angelina’ sedum (Sedum rupestre)

Sedum alboroseum 'Mediovariegatum' with golden lemon balm (Melissa officinalis 'All Gold'), 'Prairie Munchkin' little bluestem (Schizachyrium scoparium), and oxeye daisies (Leucanthemum vulgare, aka Chrysanthemum leucanthemum) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Sedum alboroseum ‘Mediovariegatum’ with golden lemon balm (Melissa officinalis ‘All Gold’), ‘Prairie Munchkin’ little bluestem (Schizachyrium scoparium), and oxeye daisies (Leucanthemum vulgare, aka Chrysanthemum leucanthemum)

A closeup of Sedum alboroseum 'Mediovariegatum' with golden lemon balm (Melissa officinalis 'All Gold') [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

A closeup of Sedum alboroseum ‘Mediovariegatum’ with golden lemon balm (Melissa officinalis ‘All Gold’)

'Axminster Gold' Russian comfrey (Symphytum x uplandicum) with 'Harvest of Memories' hybrid bearded iris [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Axminster Gold’ Russian comfrey (Symphytum x uplandicum) with ‘Harvest of Memories’ hybrid bearded iris

Eupatorium fortunei 'Pink Frost' with 'Redbor' kale and prairie blazing star (Liatris pycnostachya) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Eupatorium fortunei ‘Pink Frost’ with ‘Redbor’ kale and prairie blazing star (Liatris pycnostachya)

Lamb's ears (Stachys byzantina) with 'Junior Walker' catmint (Nepeta) and pink creeping thyme (Thymus praecox Coccineus Group) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Lamb’s ears (Stachys byzantina) with ‘Junior Walker’ catmint (Nepeta) and pink creeping thyme (Thymus praecox Coccineus Group)

Wine and Roses weigela (Weigela florida 'Alexandra') with Magic Carpet spirea (Spiraea japonica 'Walbuma') and bloody cranesbill (Geranium sanguineum) [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Wine and Roses weigela (Weigela florida ‘Alexandra’) with Magic Carpet spirea (Spiraea japonica ‘Walbuma’) and bloody cranesbill (Geranium sanguineum)

And some general garden shots…

The Happy Garden [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

The Happy Garden (look, I didn’t name it; I’m just darn lucky that Mom didn’t name *me* Happy)

The Happy Garden at Hayefield [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

The Happy Garden at Hayefield

The blue, silver, and white side of the Side Garden [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

The blue, silver, and white side of the Side Garden

Variegated fuzzy deutzia (Deutzia scabra 'Variegata') and 'Festiva Maxima' peony along the Cottage Path [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Variegated fuzzy deutzia (Deutzia scabra ‘Variegata’) and ‘Festiva Maxima’ peony along the Cottage Path

'Monsieur Jules Elie' peony, gas plant (Dictamnus albus), and white lace flower (Orlaya grandiflora) in the Side Garden [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Monsieur Jules Elie’ peony, gas plant (Dictamnus albus), and white lace flower (Orlaya grandiflora) in the Side Garden

'Caradonna' perennial sage (Salvia), giant starflower (Ornithogalum magnum), white-variegated sweet iris (Iris pallida 'Argentea Variegata'), and rue (Ruta graveolens) in the Side Garden [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Caradonna’ perennial sage (Salvia), giant starflower (Ornithogalum magnum), white-variegated sweet iris (Iris pallida ‘Argentea Variegata’), and rue (Ruta graveolens) in the Side Garden

Arbor Path in the Side Garden [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Arbor Path in the Side Garden

'Screaming Yellow' false indigo (Baptisia sphaerocarpa) in the yellow side of the Side Garden [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Screaming Yellow’ false indigo (Baptisia sphaerocarpa) in the yellow side of the Side Garden

'Screaming Yellow' false indigo (Baptisia sphaerocarpa) in the yellow side of the Side Garden [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

‘Screaming Yellow’ false indigo (Baptisia sphaerocarpa) in the yellow side of the Side Garden

The yellow side of the Side Garden [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

The yellow side of the Side Garden

Side Garden path with 'Harvest of Memories' hybrid bearded iris, 'Dr. Huey' rose, 'Latifolia Maculata' boxwood (Buxus sempervirens), golden mockorange (Philadelphus coronarius 'Aureus'), and golden wayfaringtree (Viburnum lantana 'Aurea') [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Side Garden path with ‘Harvest of Memories’ hybrid bearded iris, ‘Dr. Huey’ rose, ‘Latifolia Maculata’ boxwood (Buxus sempervirens), golden mockorange (Philadelphus coronarius ‘Aureus’), and golden wayfaringtree (Viburnum lantana ‘Aurea’)

Wine and Roses weigela (Weigela florida 'Alexandra') and red-leaved rose (Rosa glauca) with Magic Carpet spirea (Spiraea japonica 'Walbuma') and bloody cranesbill (Geranium sanguineum) in the Side Garden [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Wine and Roses weigela (Weigela florida ‘Alexandra’) and red-leaved rose (Rosa glauca) with Magic Carpet spirea (Spiraea japonica ‘Walbuma’) and bloody cranesbill (Geranium sanguineum) in the Side Garden

It's kind of a shame that, just as they start to look lush, it's time to do heavy pruning of the perennials in the front garden. [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

It’s kind of a shame that, just as they start to look lush, it’s time to do heavy pruning of the perennials in the front garden.

The gaps look bad for a few weeks, but I've learned that if I don't cut the Japanese burnet (Sanguisorba tenuifolia) and orange coneflower (Rudbeckia fulgida var. fulgida) to the ground and shear the New England asters (Symphyotrichum novae-angliae) and ironweeds (Vernonia) back by at least half now, this area would be a crowded, sprawly mess by early September. [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

The gaps look bad for a few weeks, but I’ve learned that if I don’t cut the Japanese burnet (Sanguisorba tenuifolia) and orange coneflower (Rudbeckia fulgida var. fulgida) to the ground and shear the New England asters (Symphyotrichum novae-angliae) and ironweeds (Vernonia) back by at least half now, this area would be a crowded, sprawly mess by early September.

The courtyard path is still in need of some grooming [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

The courtyard path is still in need of some grooming…

The courtyard path [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

…but it doesn’t look too bad from this direction.

So far, I've been making good on my resolution to keep up with the vegetable garden. At this point, I have pretty much every square inch planted and weeded, and now I'm mostly watering and mulching. [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

So far, I’ve been making good on my resolution to keep up with the vegetable garden. At this point, I have pretty much every square inch planted and weeded, and now I’m mostly watering and mulching.

Remember the junky "cottage garden" area I showed last month? It looks much tidier now with these new galvanized raised beds. They--and much of the larger part of the vegetable garden, too--are filled with seed gifts of wonderful oddities and interesting Italian heirloom beans, corn, and squash from Clark Lawrence of La Macchina Fissa. [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Remember the junky “cutting garden” area I showed back in April? It looks much tidier now with these new galvanized raised beds. They–and much of the larger part of the vegetable garden, too–are filled with seed gifts of wonderful oddities and interesting Italian heirloom beans, corn, and squash from Clark Lawrence of La Macchina Fissa.

And to finish, I couldn’t resist tossing in some pictures from my porch–particularly the side porch, which gives a superb raised view of the gardens.

The vegetable gardens and perennial meadows from the back porch [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

The vegetable gardens and perennial meadows from the back porch

The Cottage Path from the side porch [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

The Cottage Path from the side porch

The blue, silver, and white side of the Side Garden from the side porch [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

The blue, silver, and white side of the Side Garden from the side porch

Another view of the blue, silver, and white side of the Side Garden from the side porch [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Another view of the blue, silver, and white side of the Side Garden from the side porch

The diagonal path, which separates the front and side gardens, as seen from the side porch [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

The diagonal path, which separates the front and side gardens, as seen from the side porch

What will the next month bring for the garden?

Duncan [Nancy J. Ondra/Hayefield.com]

Who nose?

All we can do is hope for seasonable temperatures and regular rainfall, then deal with whatever we’re actually given, and enjoy our gardens in the meantime. When the weather wherever you are isn’t conducive to being outside, do some virtual garden visiting among the participants in this month’s Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day. You can find them in Carol’s main GBBD post at May Dreams Gardens. Enjoy!

25 responses to this post.

  1. Nan! I love the shape, size, and color of that gray pot. How incredible that your Gallica rose ‘La Belle Sultane’ was hiding in the shade for over ten years, but flowered again with the gift of sunshine. Those tiny flowers are so perfect, aren’t they? The whole place is looking great, so as they say here, Bravissima! I know it isn’t the exceptional soil or climate that makes your garden outstanding – it’s you!

    Hi Clark! That pot was left over from the containers book. I like it better without plants in it. And thank you for the kind words. I owe you a longer email later today!
    -Nan

  2. You never fail to impress, Nan!
    I did a quick scan of your wonderful garden and look forward to being able to slowly stroll through later with a cup of tea and a notebook. I spent the past week or so looking though your past postings and have a long list of ideas for my garden.
    I do have a question. I noticed you have quite a bit of stipa grass. I have been drawn to it in photos of the “Dutch wave” garden style lately. There seems to be no other grass that can give that soft, white wispy effect. Have you found it to be an aggressive self-sower? That has been my fear. I actually passed up on buying some at a local nursery because I was afraid it would get out of control. I had never seen it offered in my area before and wonder if I missed out on a great grass?

    Hi Debbie! You may need a whole pot of tea; it’s a long tour. No, Stipa tenuissima hasn’t been a weed problem for me; rather, I tend to lose most of it over the winter, so I’m grateful for the few seedlings I find. It *can* be a serious problem in some climates, though, so you may want to do some research on how it performs in your area before you try it.
    -Nan

  3. Love the iris ‘Lion King’. This is one I will look out for.

    It’s a beauty but a little tricky to find good companions for. Chartreuse seems to work well, and I think the purple-leaved plantain does a nice job echoing the dark veining on the iris, so another dark-leaved partner would likely work as well.
    -Nan

  4. My new garden is much smaller, but your posts always inspire – and suggest new plants to lust after.

    Good to hear from you, Pat. Small gardens are as much of a challenge as large ones, aren’t they?
    -Nan

  5. Can your Dutchman Pipe survive the winter? I grow a tropical kind here and they cannot take a hard freeze and are evergreen.

    Yep, Aristolochia macrophylla is fully hardy here in Zone 6/7, though deciduous.
    -Nan

  6. What a pleasure to wander in your garden if only online. I always find new plants and ideas and rediscover old friends I’ve forgotten about. Loved seeing shots of the plants in situ.

    I’m so glad you took the time to visit, Linda. I know a few folks like to really study the photos, so I thought they might find those overview shots of use in placing some of the tighter views.
    -Nan

  7. Posted by Liesbeth on June 15, 2017 at 9:38 am

    Try Lion King with Alium Christofii.!! 😍

    Oh, I appreciate the suggestion, Liesbeth; I wouldn’t have thought of that!
    -Nan

  8. When your garden bursts into bloom it doesn’t mess around! My heart melted over those beautiful Iris at the top of the post and I oohed and aahed throughout the rest of the post. The mauve-flowered Phlomis tuberosa grabbed my attention but P. purpurea is probably a better fit for me if I decide to add a Jerusalem sage in that color.

    So sorry, Kris: I’m glad you could enjoy the irises vicariously, at least. You’re probably quite right about the Phlomis tuberosa not working for you, since it’s adapted to more moisture. I can envy you the yellow species in return; it has never liked me.
    -Nan

    • Nan, is it Phlomis russeliana that you can’t grow? I planned to order some for my garden but now I’m worried it won’t survive. Is it too much moisture that is the problem, disease or winter cold? I don’t want to waste my precious gardening space to something that is going to sit and decline. I assume my growing conditions down in the Roanoke, VA area would be similar to yours. Just a few more mountains.

      Yes, that’s one I failed with. The cold hardiness shouldn’t be an issue; it’s winter wet. That’s particularly a problem for perennials with fuzzy leaves that are around through the winter. I wouldn’t want to discourage you from giving one a try; it may well like you better!
      -Nan

  9. Posted by pj on June 15, 2017 at 2:18 pm

    what are the pretty red blooms in your “happy” garden picture?
    the poppies were “dramatic” indeed!

    That is the appropriately named ‘Oso Happy Candy Oh!’ rose, pj. And yes, ‘Drama Queen’ was also well name!
    -Nan

  10. So spectacular, but of course I take away what I can possibly grow in Los Angeles, like that Dianthus cruentas paired with the yucca. ‘La Belle Sultane’ was definitely worth the wait. And for some reason I thought the ‘Drama Queen’ poppies were shaggier without much shape — now that I see yours, I love them! Funny about orlaya being a pest for you, because I was hoping to find a few seedlings in the garden this spring, but not a one. Your baptisia are incredible — I saw what hail can do to an emerging stand in Denver, so it’s nice to see them pristine.

    I’m glad you found a combo that might work for you, Denise. I hope to collect seed of the Dianthus cruentus; if you need some, let me know. I wonder if you’re too warm for the Orlaya to self-sow? It seems to need a cold period to germinate, but I could be wrong about that. I can imagine that hail would do very bad things to a baptisia in full bloom. It’s not something we often have to deal with, fortunately.
    -Nan

  11. Posted by Jan Haynes on June 15, 2017 at 2:50 pm

    I absolutely love your garden. Am amazed that you have such beautiful peonies.
    Would those grow in Texas? East Texas.

    Thank you, Jan; I love my garden too! I’m pretty sure that most herbaceous peonies wouldn’t be happy in your climate (not enough winter chilling for the flower buds to form, I suspect), but I encourage you to reach out to other gardeners in your area to get first-hand advice.
    -Nan

  12. Posted by Ann Evans on June 15, 2017 at 7:28 pm

    Love the Golden Catalpa! And the Screaming Yellow Baptisia too….are the two clumps in the side garden one plant each? Everything is so healthy looking.

    They are both *quite* yellow, aren’t they? Yes, the baptisias are one plant on each side of the path. I’d guess they’re about 12 years old now. I cut them back by about half as soon as they’re finished flowering, so they don’t sprawl and smother everything around them.
    -Nan

  13. Posted by Lorraine Wallace on June 15, 2017 at 7:50 pm

    Great post, Nan, so much going on in your garden. Love that Drama Queen poppy! Where do you get seeds?

    It’s been a wonderful gardening year so far, hasn’t it? I can’t remember where the ‘Drama Queen’ seeds came from originally (quite possibly HPS/MAG!), but I do have some available in my Etsy shop. Happy Bloom Day, Lorraine!
    -Nan

  14. Lovely as always. I was impressed with the fact that Catalpa comes in gold. I shall hunt for that one! Thanks for the inspiration.

    It seems to be hard to find, and boy, does it take a lot of pruning to keep it small enough for a mixed border. But it’s definitely worth both the hunt and the work.
    -Nan

  15. Posted by Donna on June 15, 2017 at 11:13 pm

    My wondering mind wants to know…do you ever forget that you’ve planted something when you discover it much much later? So much to keep track of, and you give us a wonderful tour each month! And, question, do you ever cut back Frau Dagmar?
    Thank you, once again, for the beauty!

    Do I ever forget that I planted something? Oh, yes. That’s why I’ve found blogging so useful. I’ve also taken up a trick from my friend Clark: The first time I mention a new plant here, I tell who it came from, so I can find that information later. This is the only form of journaling I’ve ever been able to stick with.

    To answer your other question, yes, I usually cut her back to about 1 foot every 3 or 4 years.
    -Nan

  16. Posted by Lisa at Greenbow on June 16, 2017 at 6:46 am

    I always feel like a sluggard after reading your posts. I have to come back to these bloom posts more than once to take it all in. What a beautiful garden. I love seeing the over all photos. It puts these blooming plants into the garden. I always see plants I want to try, some I have never heard of or certainly not seen in a garden. A treasure trove for sure. May the weather be kind to our gardens this year. Bloom on….

    Any day I can meet a new plant is a good day, so I’m always pleased when I can show others my own new favorites. I really appreciate your comments, Lisa. And yes, amen to gentle weather. Happy Bloom Day to you!
    -Nan

  17. Posted by sharon robinson on June 18, 2017 at 7:05 am

    Dear Nan, I look for your column every day, hoping to see some new photos etc. My following pictures are from two gardens that were established in May, 2017, so they have a ways to go yet. Thank you for your inspiration. Ekkkk, don’t know how to include a photo… Sharon

    Sorry about that, Sharon. I really do appreciate you taking the time to read and comment. Other work commitments make it unlikely that I will ever go back to posting more than once a month, so I try to make that one full enough to last a while. Happy Bloom Day to you, and I wish you much happiness watching the progress of your new gardens!
    -Nan

  18. Posted by Yelena on June 19, 2017 at 11:18 am

    Absolutely beautiful !

    Thank you, Yelena!
    -Nan

  19. Posted by Nono on June 19, 2017 at 4:29 pm

    Hello Nan, Yours photos are very, very beautiful !!!! I allready told you : it’s my favourite blog of all gardens I follow ! Thanks to you. Nono (the french gardener).

    Greetings, Nono, and thank you for reading and commenting. I hope your garden is treating you well this year!
    -Nan

  20. So glad the Cynanchum bloomed for you. It will get bigger and better every year! But why is it called cruel plant? I am still jealous of the great deal you got on those arbors. And is that a new greenhouse I see?

    Hi Kathy! “Cruel Plant” and “Mosquito Trap Plant” seem to be the two most commonly used common names, but I couldn’t find a good explanation for either. It’s still in bloom–well over a month now–in a holding bed. I am on the lookout for a special place for it in the garden. Thanks so much for sharing it with me! The greenhouse…well, it was new in 2014. But it doesn’t often show up in my photos because of where it’s placed, so it’s not surprising that it looks like a new feature.
    -Nan

  21. Posted by ShelleyB05 on June 25, 2017 at 3:43 pm

    Nan. As always, I find a nice quiet corner where I can lackadaisically stroll through your posts. But it always has to be early in the day so I’ll have time to run to the garden center afterward! I so appreciate your posts, the information you provide and your sense of humor. Thank you for the scenic photos as well. I love the perspective after seeing the up close companions. I default to buying pinks and purples, and your gardens remind me of yellows and whites. I am drawn to the moody deep purples like your ‘black Barlow’ Columbine. I’ve added that to my list.
    I first saw Japanese Burnet here on your blog and have not been able to find it anywhere. Any suggestions (I’ve looked them up and am pretty sure they will grow in 5b).
    There are a number of plant combinations in my own garden that I’ve taken straight from your blog. Today, I found two more!!

    Hey there, Shelley. I really appreciate that you took time out of your weekend to read and comment. It’s great to hear that you enjoyed the photos, and even better to hear that you’ve picked up some combinations that work for you. It looks like Avant Gardens currently has Sanguisorba tenuifolia plants available: http://avantgardensne.com/sanguisorba-tenuifolia. It’s also not difficult to grow from seed; in fact, my plants self-sow all over, even into the grass paths!
    -Nan

  22. Posted by Barbara Dashwood on June 26, 2017 at 11:37 am

    Hi Nan! Thanks for the garden tour. So lovely and so inspiring, as always. The iris seem to really stand out. Must add more to our garden. Barbara, Victoria, BC.

    It’s great to hear from you, Barbara. I hope the gardening season is treating you well so far!
    -Nan

  23. It’s kind of funny, I read your posts the day they go up, but then usually come back and re-read them a few times before commenting since there’s always so much to digest! This one’s a great one with so many overviews on top of all the fantastic combos :)
    I tried to get either the yellow or purple catalpa last winter… now I regret it even more that I wasn’t able to find it, it looks great this year.
    You must be happy to finally have some regular rain back in the garden after last year’s drought. Green and growing is so much nicer a look!
    By chance were you able to grow ‘Governor Aiken’ verbascum again? I did manage to find a few seeds on mine, but now they’re all blooming yellow so I think the wild V. thapsus got in there. I guess I’ll see what their children look like, and I guess I’ll also have to take a stronger stance against the wild ones since I do tend to let them go!

    Hi Frank! I wonder why the golden catalpa is so hard to find now. I’d considered getting the purple one too, but maintaining just this one takes a fair bit of time and garden space. I think the purple one loses its color in hot weather, too. Speaking of weather, yes, this has been a top-notch season so far for gardening, with regular rain. Not so good for haying, though, which is a worry, though Duncan certainly isn’t lacking for pasture.

    I do have a couple of self-sown seedlings of the ‘GGA’ mullein this year. I wasn’t sure if it would cross with V. thapsus, but I made a point of keeping any nearby thapsus deadheaded, and my ‘GGA’ are still white. If you want some of last fall’s seed so you can start new plants this summer, feel free to email me.
    -Nan

    • I see heat and humidity on the horizon, my laziness level usually rises with the temperature…
      Thanks for the offer, I may take you up on it! Right now I’m pleased to see that although I have yellow blooms on my ‘Not really GGA’ the flowers are much larger than the straight V. thapsus and it’s an impressive plant overall. I may see what the next generation of seedlings turn out to be, maybe I’ll get lucky and see some white flowers return!

      I have another thought: Gardens North offers seed of Verbascum ‘Electric Yellow’ (White Form), which looks very much like ‘Governor George Aiken’, and the description says “This is the lovely white form of the large-flowered Verbascum ‘Electric Yellow’. Open pollinated, so you will likely obtain yellow forms as well.” I wonder if it is the same strain. See what you think, if you want: Verbascums at Gardens North.
      -Nan

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