Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day – June 2016

The Side Garden at Hayefield in June [Nancy J. Ondra]

With so much going on in the garden this time of year, it would be easy enough to do a Bloom Day post every week without getting boring. I’ve limited myself to just the past 10 days for this once-a-month extravaganza, and there’s still a lot to show, so let’s get right to the good stuff, focusing first on what’s in flower.

'Ambassador' ornamental onion (Allium) with fringecups (Tellima grandiflora); Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

‘Ambassador’ ornamental onion (Allium) with fringecups (Tellima grandiflora)

Climbing asparagus (Asparagus verticillatus); Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Climbing asparagus (Asparagus verticillatus)

Hardy kiwi (Actinidia arguta): male flowers [Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield]

Hardy kiwi (Actinidia arguta): male flowers

'Deutschland' astilbe (Astilbe) in bud; Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

‘Deutschland’ astilbe (Astilbe) in bud

'Sunningdale Variegated' masterwort (Astrantia major); Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

‘Sunningdale Variegated’ masterwort (Astrantia major)

Blue false indigo (Baptisia australis); Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Blue false indigo (Baptisia australis)

'Screamin' Yellow' yellow false indigo (Baptisia sphaerocarpa); Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

‘Screamin’ Yellow’ yellow false indigo (Baptisia sphaerocarpa)

Hare's ear (Bupleurum rotundifolium): Also charming for chartreuse, and beautiful blue-green foliage too [Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield]

Hare’s ear (Bupleurum rotundifolium): Charming for chartreuse, and beautiful blue-green foliage too

Hare's ear (Bupleurum rotundifolium); Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Hare’s ear (Bupleurum rotundifolium)

'Sarastro' bellflower (Campanula); Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

‘Sarastro’ bellflower (Campanula)

I don't know why I've been pulling the oxeye daisies (Leucanthemum vulgare [Chrysanthemum leucanthemum]) out of my garden for years. They last for only a few weeks, but they're very pretty and come up in places where other things don't want to grow. [Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield]

I don’t know why I’ve been pulling the oxeye daisies (Leucanthemum vulgare [Chrysanthemum leucanthemum]) out of my garden for years. They last for only a few weeks, but they’re very pretty and come up in places where other things don’t want to grow.

Serious Black clematis (Clematis recta 'Lime Close') against Diabolo ninebark (Physocarpus opulifolius 'Monlo') [Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield]

Serious Black clematis (Clematis recta ‘Lime Close’) against Diabolo ninebark (Physocarpus opulifolius ‘Monlo’)

Pale leatherflower (Clematis versicolor) [Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield]

Pale leatherflower (Clematis versicolor)

Tufted hair grass (Deschampsia cespitosa) [Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield]

Tufted hair grass (Deschampsia cespitosa)

Variegated rough deutzia (Deutzia scabra 'Variegata') [Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield]

Variegated rough deutzia (Deutzia scabra ‘Variegata’)

American ipecac (Gillenia stipulata [Porteranthus stipulatus]) [Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield]

American ipecac (Gillenia stipulata [Porteranthus stipulatus])

Foxtail barley (Hordeum jubatum) [Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield]

Foxtail barley (Hordeum jubatum)

'Lollypop' Asiatic lily (Lilium) [Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield]

‘Lollypop’ Asiatic lily (Lilium)

Motherwort (Leonurus cardiaca) [Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield]

Motherwort (Leonurus cardiaca)

'The Flasher' variegated Maltese cross (Lychnis chalcedonica): some stems are solid green, some are green-and-white, and some--like this one--are solid white. [Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield]

‘The Flasher’ variegated Maltese cross (Lychnis chalcedonica): some stems are solid green, some are green-and-white, and some–like this one–are solid white.

Rose campion (Lychnis coronaria) [Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield]

Rose campion (Lychnis coronaria)

Bowles' golden grass (Milium effusum 'Aureum') [Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield]

Bowles’ golden grass (Milium effusum ‘Aureum’)

'Sarah Bernhardt' herbaceous peony (Paeonia lactiflora) [Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield]

‘Sarah Bernhardt’ herbaceous peony (Paeonia lactiflora)

'Dark Towers' beardtongue (Penstemon) [Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield]

‘Dark Towers’ beardtongue (Penstemon)

'Gold Foil' foxglove penstemon (Penstemon digitalis) [Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield]

‘Gold Foil’ foxglove penstemon (Penstemon digitalis)

'Venus' annual poppy (Papaver) [Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield]

‘Venus’ annual poppy (Papaver)

Giant fleeceflower (Persicaria polymorpha) [Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield]

Giant fleeceflower (Persicaria polymorpha)

Petunia exserta [Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield]

Petunia exserta

Caucasian crosswort (Phuopsis stylosa) [Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield]

Caucasian crosswort (Phuopsis stylosa)

Golden hoptree (Ptelea trifoliata 'Aurea') [Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield]

Golden hoptree (Ptelea trifoliata ‘Aurea’)

'Belle de Crecy' Gallica rose (Rosa) [Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield]

‘Belle de Crecy’ Gallica rose (Rosa)

A solid-yellow sport of 'Axminster Gold' Russian comfrey (Symphytum x uplandicum) [Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield]

A solid-yellow sport of ‘Axminster Gold’ Russian comfrey (Symphytum x uplandicum)

Japanese tree lilac (Syringa reticulata) [Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield]

Japanese tree lilac (Syringa reticulata)

Carolina lupine (Thermopsis villosa [T. caroliniana]) [Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield]

Carolina lupine (Thermopsis villosa [T. caroliniana])

Creeping thyme (Thymus praecox Coccineus Group) [Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield]

Creeping thyme (Thymus praecox Coccineus Group)

'Governor George Aiken' mullein (Verbascum) [Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield]

‘Governor George Aiken’ mullein (Verbascum)

Next, some recent leafy highlights as an early entry for Foliage Follow-Up, hosted by Pam at Digging on the 16th of each month.

'Chocolate Shogun' astilbe (Astilbe) [Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield]

‘Chocolate Shogun’ astilbe (Astilbe)

'Red Majestic' contorted hazel (Corylus avellana) [Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield]

‘Red Majestic’ contorted hazel (Corylus avellana)

'Lava Lamp' heuchera (Heuchera) with 'Pacific Crest' foamflower (Tiarella) [Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield]

‘Lava Lamp’ heuchera (Heuchera) with ‘Pacific Crest’ foamflower (Tiarella)

'Sunny Side Up' pokeweed (Phytolacca americana) [Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield]

‘Sunny Side Up’ pokeweed (Phytolacca americana)

Allegheny pachysandra (Pachysandra procumbens) [Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield]

Allegheny pachysandra (Pachysandra procumbens)

I’ve started listing some of the earliest-ripening seeds in my Etsy shop and will continue to add more every week or two through the rest of the season. A couple other seeds and fruits that look interesting now include…

Dyer's woad (Isatis tinctoria) [Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield]

Dyer’s woad (Isatis tinctoria)

Last month's pollination attempt was a success: Looks like I may get the first harvest from my pawpaws (Asimina triloba) this year! [Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield]

Last month’s pollination attempt was a success: Looks like I may get the first harvest from my pawpaws (Asimina triloba) this year!

Now, putting flowers and foliage together for some early-summer combinations…

Upright spurge (Euphorbia stricta)--one of my favorite fillers for summer chartreuse--with the ferny foliage of yellow-leaved tansy (Tanacetum vulgare 'Aureum') [Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield]

Upright spurge (Euphorbia stricta)–one of my favorite fillers for summer chartreuse–with the ferny foliage of yellow-leaved tansy (Tanacetum vulgare ‘Aureum’)

Bright white lace flower (Orlaya grandiflora) with creamy white 'Semiplena' Leichtlin's camas (Camassia leichtlinii), dainty fringecups (Tellima grandiflora), and the short, deep blue spikes of 'Marcus' perennial salvia (Salvia) [Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield]

Bright white lace flower (Orlaya grandiflora) with creamy white ‘Semiplena’ Leichtlin’s camas (Camassia leichtlinii), dainty fringecups (Tellima grandiflora), and the short, deep blue spikes of ‘Marcus’ perennial salvia (Salvia)

Oxeye daisy (Leucanthemum vulgare [Chrysanthemum leucanthemum]) against 'Fiesta' variegated forsythia (Forsythia) [Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield]

Oxeye daisy (Leucanthemum vulgare [Chrysanthemum leucanthemum]) against ‘Fiesta’ variegated forsythia (Forsythia)

Motherwort (Leonurus cardiaca), 'Eveline' speedwell (Veronica), Peach Sorbet blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum 'ZF06-043'), German chamomile (Matricaria recutita), and 'All Gold' lemon balm (Melissa officinalis) [Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield]

Motherwort (Leonurus cardiaca), dyer’s woad (Isatis tinctoria) seedhead, ‘Eveline’ speedwell (Veronica), Peach Sorbet blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum ‘ZF06-043’), German chamomile (Matricaria recutita), and ‘All Gold’ lemon balm (Melissa officinalis)

Orange 'Christa' heuchera (Heuchera) with the yellow leaves and reddish pink flowers of 'Circus' heuchera and the blue-gray foliage of 'Lauren's Grape' poppy (Papaver) [Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield]

Orange ‘Christa’ heuchera (Heuchera) with the yellow leaves and reddish pink flowers of ‘Circus’ heuchera and the blue-gray foliage of ‘Lauren’s Grape’ poppy (Papaver)

'Sun Power' hosta with 'Gerald Darby' iris (Iris x robusta) and 'Purple Dragon' spotted deadnettle (Lamium maculatum) [Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield]

‘Sun Power’ hosta with ‘Gerald Darby’ iris (Iris x robusta) and ‘Purple Dragon’ spotted deadnettle (Lamium maculatum)

'Butter and Sugar' Siberian iris (Iris sibirica) with willow-leaved bluestar (Amsonia tabernaemontana) [Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield]

‘Butter and Sugar’ Siberian iris (Iris sibirica) with willow-leaved bluestar (Amsonia tabernaemontana)

Maltese cross (Lychnis chalcedonica) with the foliage of 'Dali Marble' burnet (Sanguisorba) [Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield]

Maltese cross (Lychnis chalcedonica) with the foliage of ‘Dali Marble’ burnet (Sanguisorba)

Euphorbia palustris 'Zauberflote' with 'Berggarten' sage (Salvia officinalis), 'Joanna Reed' catmint (Nepeta), and 'Ray's Golden Campion' red campion (Silene dioica) [Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield]

Euphorbia palustris ‘Zauberflote’ with ‘Berggarten’ sage (Salvia officinalis), ‘Joanna Reed’ catmint (Nepeta), and ‘Ray’s Golden Campion’ red campion (Silene dioica)

Star of Persia (Allium christophii) with 'Cramers' Plum' love-in-a-mist (Nigella damascena) [Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield]

Star of Persia (Allium christophii) with ‘Cramers’ Plum’ love-in-a-mist (Nigella damascena) flowers

A dark-leaved peach (Prunus persica) seedling with the seedpods of 'Cramers' Plum' love-in-a-mist (Nigella damascena) [Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield]

A dark-leaved peach (Prunus persica) seedling with the seedpods of ‘Cramers’ Plum’ love-in-a-mist (Nigella damascena)

Junior Walker catmint (Nepeta x faassenii 'Novanepjun') with 'Powis Castle' artemisia (Artemisia) [Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield]

Junior Walker catmint (Nepeta x faassenii ‘Novanepjun’) with ‘Powis Castle’ artemisia (Artemisia)

'Lauren's Grape' poppy (Papaver) against 'Red Majestic' contorted hazel (Corylus avellana) [Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield]

‘Lauren’s Grape’ poppy (Papaver) against ‘Red Majestic’ contorted hazel (Corylus avellana)

Pink Knock Out rose (Rosa ‘Radcon’), Golden Spirit smoke bush (Cotinus coggygria ‘Ancot’), ‘Brookside’ hardy geranium (Geranium), 'Skyracer' purple moor grass (Molinia caerulea), and 'Screamin' Yellow' yellow false indigo (Baptisia sphaerocarpa) [Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield]

Pink Knock Out rose (Rosa ‘Radcon’), Golden Spirit smoke bush (Cotinus coggygria ‘Ancot’), ‘Brookside’ hardy geranium (Geranium), ‘Skyracer’ purple moor grass (Molinia caerulea), and ‘Screamin’ Yellow’ yellow false indigo (Baptisia sphaerocarpa)

'Elizabeth' two-row sedum (Sedum spurium) with creeping thyme (Thymus praecox) and hens-and-chicks (Sempervivum tectorum) [Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield]

‘Elizabeth’ two-row sedum (Sedum spurium) with creeping thyme (Thymus praecox) and hens-and-chicks (Sempervivum tectorum)

'Eveline' speedwell (Veronica) with Peach Sorbet blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum 'ZF06-043') [Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield]

‘Eveline’ speedwell (Veronica) with Peach Sorbet blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum ‘ZF06-043’)

'Munstead' English lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) underplanted--or is it aroundplanted?--with 'Clear Gold' thyme (Thymus) [Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield]

‘Munstead’ English lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) underplanted–or is it aroundplanted?–with ‘Clear Gold’ thyme (Thymus)

And to finish, some general garden shots…

The side garden at Hayefield in early morning [Nancy J. Ondra]

The side garden at Hayefield in early morning

Almost the same view of the side garden as above, but looking quite different on a cloudy afternoon [Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield]

Almost the same view of the side garden as above, but looking quite different on a cloudy afternoon

Another vignette in the side garden at Hayefield, with Serious Black clematis (Clematis recta 'Lime Close'), 'Screamin' Yellow' yellow false indigo (Baptisia sphaerocarpa), and variegated wayfaring tree (Viburnum lantana) [Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield]

Another vignette in the side garden at Hayefield, with Serious Black clematis (Clematis recta ‘Lime Close’), ‘Screamin’ Yellow’ yellow false indigo (Baptisia sphaerocarpa), and variegated wayfaring tree (Viburnum lantana)

By fall, this path will be lined with asters and other bright late bloomers; for now, it's a quieter scene with 'Gerald Darby' iris (Iris x robusta) in flower [Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield]

By fall, this path will be lined with asters and other bright late bloomers; for now, it’s a quieter scene with ‘Gerald Darby’ iris (Iris x robusta) in flower

The inner border in the side garden at Hayefield, including white-variegated sweet iris (Iris pallida 'Argentea Variegata'), Euphorbia palustris 'Zauberflote', 'Ray's Golden Campion' red campion (Silene dioica), Ornithogalum magnum, and 'Caradonna' perennial salvia (Salvia) [Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield]

The inner border in the side garden at Hayefield, including white-variegated sweet iris (Iris pallida ‘Argentea Variegata’), Euphorbia palustris ‘Zauberflote’, ‘Ray’s Golden Campion’ red campion (Silene dioica), Ornithogalum magnum, and ‘Caradonna’ perennial salvia (Salvia)

Diagonal border in the side garden at Hayefield with 'Snow Hill' perennial salvia (Salvia), 'Big Ears' lamb's ears (Stachys byzantina), Junior Walker catmint (Nepeta x faassenii 'Novanepjun'), and white lace flower (Orlaya grandiflora) [Nancy J. Ondra]

Diagonal border in the side garden at Hayefield with ‘Snow Hill’ perennial salvia (Salvia), ‘Big Ears’ lamb’s ears (Stachys byzantina), Junior Walker catmint (Nepeta x faassenii ‘Novanepjun’), and white lace flower (Orlaya grandiflora)

Diagonal border in the side garden at Hayefield from the opposite direction, with a patch of white lace flower (Orlaya grandiflora) in the foreground [Nancy J. Ondra]

Diagonal border in the side garden at Hayefield from the opposite direction, with a patch of white lace flower (Orlaya grandiflora) in the foreground

Thanks to you all for taking the time to visit today. Want to revel in more early-summer abundance? Check out the list of participants in Carol’s main Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day post at May Dreams Gardens. Happy gardening, everyone!

23 responses to this post.

  1. Posted by Laura on June 15, 2016 at 4:41 am

    Thanks, Nancy. Gorgeous!

    Thank *you* for visiting, Laura. I hope you have a beautiful day in your part of the world.
    -Nan

  2. Posted by Sue Gilmour on June 15, 2016 at 6:28 am

    Love seeing all your flora in bloom! Gives me a window to what I can expect a month although I do have a few irises in bloom this week. We did have an early spring if a might cold! Still out there transplanting, hope your “Lauren’s Grape” will bloom. Lots of poppies up and that’s a new garden so hopefully it’s them(6 inches high)! I don’t know how you get any work done, I would be meandering around with a cuppa all day long! Have a great day, TTFN…Sue (Nova Scotia, Canada)

    Hey there, Sue! Not so much meandering here; more staggering around with buckets of water to keep the seedlings alive. I wish you a truly glorious growing season, along with the good health to enjoy it to the fullest this year!
    -Nan

  3. Hello Nan! I posted this to my Facebook page with a serious question: Every single time I see your Bloom Day posts I learn about new plants. But how many plants can one gardener own? :) It’s amazing to think that most of them are also from seed – totally your own creations!

    That’s a serious question? Really, Clark? Well, let me know if you get a serious answer from someone, so we’ll both know what to shoot for!
    -Nan

  4. Posted by Nick on June 15, 2016 at 9:11 am

    Oh I love the Leonurus Cardiaca.

    Beautiful planting as always.

    Thanks, Nick. The motherwort *can* be somewhat weedy, but I’m happy to have it in my garden, because it’s a useful medicinal herb.
    -Nan

  5. I am always so in awe of your beautiful gardens! I have entertained that big boy fleece flower – it looks stunning! You have so many interesting blooms. Awestruck.

    Oh, Kathy – that’s just a *small* clump of giant fleeceflower, from a piece of crown that got left behind when I moved the main plant 4 or 5 years ago. Established clumps can easily reach 10 feet across, or even wider. And that’s from a solid crown, not surface runners or creeping roots.
    -Nan

  6. I have eagerly awaited this post and find I only have time to quickly skim through it. A project this week installing a wheelchair ramp led to the decision to divert the gutter downspout into the ground. Now I have the job of digging a trench through my 25 foot long flower bed and burying the drain tubing. My poor lamb’s ears are being lifted and then replanted and I have to beat the rain!
    I wanted to mention that the burnet ‘Sugar Tip’ I was inspired by you to buy has started blooming. Very pretty, but I need to move it to a spot where it will be appreciated better. I will be searching through your posts to see what you have paired your burnets with.
    Thanks for all the inspiration and information!
    Debbie

    Hi Debbie! That’s sounds like a big project; I hope you were able to get everything done before the rain. I’m not familiar with ‘Sugar Tip’ burnet and couldn’t find any info on it. I’ll be interested to hear what you think of it this summer.
    -Nan

    • Oops, I meant ‘Chocolate tip.’ I just bought a ‘Sugar Tip” Rose of Sharon this week. I probably got you all excited picturing a burnet flower with a white tip! You would have to buy one!!

      You bet I would! I just Googled ‘Chocolate Tip’; it looks very cute. It’ll be interesting to hear if it really does reach only 30 inches; most of my S. officinalis plants are at least twice that height.
      -Nan

      • Mine is 26 inches, but it was planted last fall. Perhaps it will get bigger as it becomes better established. It needs to get taller to peek above other plants. Otherwise, it’s lost, being so low to the ground. I made the mistake of placing it too far back in the border and it’s against a “Diablo” Ninebark.

        Yep, I bet you are right about it getting taller this year. It’s easy for those dark-flowered burnets to blend it unless they are against something like chartreuse or variegated foliage, or pale bark.
        -Nan

  7. What an extravaganza!! I was excited to see the Bupleurum rotundifolium–yours are much more “rotund” than mine which came back this year after I first planted the seeds you sent me. Perhaps they are not so happy in a container. I still enjoy their petite size and delicate color.
    we are moving into a really lush and colorful summer!

    How wonderful to hear that the Bupleurum seeds have done well for you, Mrs. Colliver. They do seem to be happier in the ground, but the plants are very pretty when they are small too. Yes, it should be quite a summer. We’ve certainly had a lot of practice for it so far, temperature-wise.
    -Nan

  8. Posted by Allan Robinson on June 15, 2016 at 11:40 am

    Happy Bloom Day Nan, thank you for showing us the beautiful flowers in your lovely garden, its always a treat.

    Good to hear from you today, Allan. I hope you, your family, and the pups are all enjoying your garden and pond.
    -Nan

  9. Posted by Barb Pinson on June 15, 2016 at 1:34 pm

    Absolutely gorgeous!

    Thanks, Barb! Happy Bloom Day to you.
    -Nan

  10. As usual, your post is full of mouth-watering plants and eye-popping combinations! The seasonal changes in your garden also amaze me as those are more subtle here. This month, I found myself intrigued by Bupleurum, which reminds me a bit of some Euphorbias. That Leonotis cardiaca also drew my attention but thus far I haven’t found much on its cultural requirements – I can grow L. leonurus but I don’t know if the other thrives in a similar environment. Can you comment on that? I liked the Artemisia-Nepeta combination too and it has me wondering if the Artemisia’s scent would keep the neighborhood cats from mowing Nepeta to the ground as they generally do here. I may give that a try.

    Thanks for another wonderful post, Nan!

    Hi Kris! I found varying zone info on the Leonurus cardiaca; some say Zones 3 to 8 and others rate it up to 10, and one map of its distribution shows it in every state *but* California. It’s pretty adaptable here in PA as far as sun and soil. I have to be honest, though: It’s probably not something you’d add to an ornamental garden, unless you like plants that have herbal (medicinal) uses.
    -Nan

  11. Posted by Vicki Maloney on June 15, 2016 at 3:37 pm

    So pretty! I’m looking at your established plantings & hoping mine will look like that soon. Well, someday at least. My seeds from your generous giveaway that I got many plantlets from are: rose campion (wildly successful, which I suspect is no surprise), tansy (all reverted to green, I’m afraid—but still, nice feathery foliage!), aster (which are happy as Larry here, both planted out in the ground and in containers), and Little bluestem plants, which I hope grow up in time to turn color by fall.

    I have several currant tomato plants going, and the edamame & the hungarian rice bean sprouted quickly & are growing big. I got one joe-pye weed ‘Little Joe’ which is still pretty little so far. Nothing on the rosa glauca or liatris front, unfortunately, and I had one tiny crocosmia sprout but I uncovered it too soon & it fried in the sun. I think I learned something there. I still have some crocosmia seeds in a soda bottle mini-greenhouse so maybe something will still happen there.

    I had so many of the above seedlings that I gave several of each away, making a friend who gardens in West Philly very happy :)

    I hope you don’t mind the blow-by-blow report, lol, but I never grew from seed before and you gave me the opportunity, and the incentive, and I wanted to thank you and to let you know how a first-timer did with your seeds.

    Vicki

    I’m very grateful that you took the time to report on the seeds, Vicki. It sounds like you had tremendous success, especially for your first attempt with seed-sowing. You really made my day. Keep up the good work, and best of luck with your garden this summer!
    -Nan

  12. Posted by Tom on June 15, 2016 at 4:02 pm

    As always, your garden looks great, Nancy. I’m happy to report that I have three Verbascum ‘Gov. George Aiken’ in bloom, from seed you sent a couple of years ago. I’m a fan of the Mullein clan and the Gov. is definitely a keeper. Thanks again.

    Hi Tom! That’s great news about the Verbascum. I’ve very happy to have some in bloom again this year. The first time I grew it, I assumed that it would self-sow all over, as most mulleins do, but the parent plants died after setting seed and not one seedling appeared. I gave away lots but fortunately found a few left in my seed box to try again. Thanks go to Alice Beisiegel, another reader, for originally sharing the seeds of this beauty.
    -Nan

  13. Posted by Erin Hynes on June 15, 2016 at 4:37 pm

    I’ve long wondered why I’ve never seen foxtail barley (Hordeum jubatum) in gardens–it’s so beautiful. Did you find it in the trade?

    Sort of a funny story about this one: The seeds came to me from another reader (thanks, Clark!) simply labeled “iridescent grass from Venlo.” Once it flowered, it took me a bit to figure out its true identity. It is *so* photogenic, especially when backlit, and dances in the slightest breeze. It’s native to much of North America but can self-sow freely and is considered weedy in some areas.
    -Nan

  14. Posted by Sandy on June 15, 2016 at 8:15 pm

    Loved every bit of it, Nan, but was especially pulled in by Hayefield’s side garden in early morning…..just all around lovely. Thank you for sharing your beautiful garden.

    Hi there, Sandy. The light at dawn has been so pretty this last week, I’ve gotten really carried away with taking pictures. But I’ll be very happy if we wake up to a soaking rain tomorrow morning!
    -Nan

  15. Happy bloom day ! I just want you to know I enjoyed having your “Tinantia erecta seeds , last year . I’ve been finding new seedlings everywhere, which is a good thing in my book . They are being relocated to all my bare patches in the garden along with the other self seeders.

    I’m relieved to hear that you consider it a good thing, Linda. The plant can get a bit over-enthusiastic about ensuring future generations, but it sure is nice to have the seedlings where you need a moderately tall filler annual that can take shade.
    -Nan

  16. Posted by Harma on June 17, 2016 at 3:55 pm

    Hello Nancy…is there still a plant you don’t have???Everything is so beautiful!!! I’am Dutch,but I live in Italy,my sister lives in Philadelphia and she let me know a lot of plants..One of them is the Baptisia.After a long searching I found it in white but I hope to find the one you showed here(B,australis)You know close to where I live there is a Alpaca-farm…I love those animals!!!!

    I love them too, Harma! Thanks so much for visiting and introducing yourself; it’s a pleasure to meet you. I’ll try to remember to collect some seed of the Baptisia australis this summer so I have some to share.
    -Nan

  17. It’s embarrassing how long I spend going through your posts…. and then googling things, reading comments, clicking links… and then eyeing things in your Etsy shop :)
    Thanks as always for another inspiring post, between this one and your last bulbs posts I think I have enough to work on for the next few years!
    I’m hiding in the air conditioning today and I think the enjoyable cool weather is gone for a few days, but the chore of mowing the lawn is also gone as it dries up in the sun. I would relax and water but the gnats are thick and relentless this summer and they give me no peace.
    What is exciting though is how well your seeds have been coming up this spring. I love the little leaves on the sanguisorba best of all, but older seedlings of phlomis bloomed for the first time this spring and that was something as well. I should do an Ondra post and just focus on plants which came here via you, as I think on it there are quite a few!
    Enjoy the rest of June

    Hey, Frank. We’re having the same hot, dry weather on this side of PA, and I am soooo far behind getting my perennials cut back, but you’re right that the mowing has slowed down, at least. I’m staying indoors the next few days to clean and pack all of the seeds I’ve collected so far. It’s so great to hear that you’ve had good luck with some from past years. Let me know if you need/want more ‘Ray’s Golden Campion’. Stay cool!
    -Nan

  18. I love the Lauren’s Grape against the contorted hazel. Motherwort is a weed for me. I love the first year rosette but I think the flower stalk looks ugly. But that’s just me. Like Frank, I have a lot of seedlings that I must thank you for. Now I need to get them to full grown plants. Still waiting for rain here.

    I agree that motherwort is not the prettiest plant there is, and yes, we occasionally see it as a weed around here as well. But it’s rather like stinging nettle: I’m happy to have both plants around because they are so useful herbally. We sure could use a good soaking rain here too; the plants are gasping and the alpacas are dust-brown instead of their proper silver-gray.
    -Nan

  19. You are so right about a lot going on in your garden. I love the Fox tail grass. I just saw this on our trip out west. It lined the roads and looked so pretty with the light shining on it. I love those little bells on the clematis. Mine isn’t blooming yet. So dry here. Scary here in June to be so dry. Happy GBBD.

    P.S. I hope you get the paw paws before the critters.

    Hi Lisa! Yes, the Hordeum jubatum is a beautiful grass, though the phrase “lined the roads” does give one pause. Even here, it has produced a LOT of seeds. I hope to eventually list some for sale, but the awns (the stiff hairs) on each seed are several inches long, so I’m going to have to trim them all by hand before packaging. It’s horribly dry here too. We were supposed to have 100% chance of thunderstorms today. What we got rain-wise was not even measurable, and it has been sunny since then. Anyone who says “Oh, we’re so lucky to have such nice weather” is clearly not a gardener!
    -Nan

  20. Posted by Carolyn on June 23, 2016 at 5:20 pm

    The garden looks beautiful, June is the best month here in England for the garden. I like the look of your white Nigella, does it self-seed as easily as the blue ? I bought a packet of the blue a few years ago and they have seeded every year since. I like annuals that do that.

    Greetings, Carolyn. I think Spetember is my best month, but June hasn’t been too bad here. Yes, the ‘Cramers’ Plum’ nigella does seed around as freely as the blue. The self-sown seedlings bloom mostly in May to early June and are pods now; then the seeds that drop from those will bloom in later summer and fall.
    -Nan

  21. Hi Nan, we desperately need rain also. But just wanted you to know how much the pictures of your garden lifts my spirits. So pretty! And this year I was able to see the flowers of Lauren’s Grape poppy, and the petunia exserta came up from last year’s seeds. I let my neighbor’s granddaughters help me transplant the seedlings. I also dug them a small bed for zinnias. They each have their own bed. They planted the seeds, watered them in, and they’re up and growing. Rain would help! Thank you for all your work in gathering the seeds and sharing with your followers. You are such an inspiration even for a 75 year old like me.

    Hooray for success with seeds! I’m really taken with Petunia exserta: such sturdy plants and so many blooms! The only problem is some little caterpillar that comes along in midsummer and feasts on the seedpods. At least it leaves enough of them for me to collect some seed, and for the plants to self-sow, as yours did. Let’s keep our hopes up for a soaking rain. Now they’re saying Tuesday for us, but that’s five days away. All the best to you!
    -Nan

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