Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day – October 2015

Front Garden in October; Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Ah, glorious, glorious fall. It’s easy to forget about all of the growing season’s dramas and disappointments–the multiple extended dry spells, the weeds, the ticks, and the yellow jackets–and spend hours wandering around with a camera in one hand and seed-collecting bags in the other. The colors are simply amazing.

Duncan and Daniel: the Birthday Boys; Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Duncan and Daniel: the Birthday Boys

Yes, well…I hadn’t meant that kind of color, obviously. But both boys turned 13 in the past week, and after a few too many alpaca treats, they wanted to be part of the seasonal celebration.

Frost aster (Symphyotrichum pilosum) with 'Crimson Beauty' fleeceflower (Persicaria) and 'Elegantissima' boxwood (Buxus sempervirens 'Elegantissima'); Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Frost aster (Symphyotrichum pilosum) with ‘Crimson Beauty’ fleeceflower (Persicaria) and ‘Elegantissima’ boxwood (Buxus sempervirens ‘Elegantissima’)

What I really meant was color from the plants. Of all the fall flowers, asters are among my favorites. They’re just there for most of the year, hardly noticeable, then suddenly explode into color. And, most of the asters here have planted themselves, making excellent space-fillers with no work on my part (other than weeding out those that come up where I don’t need them).

Frost aster (Symphyotrichum pilosum) with New England asters (Aster novae-angliae) and the seedheads of purple coneflower (Echinacea purpurea); Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Frost aster (Symphyotrichum pilosum) with New England asters (Aster novae-angliae) and the seedheads of purple coneflower (Echinacea purpurea)

Frost aster (Symphyotrichum pilosum) with purple New England aster (Aster novae-angliae) and Brazilian vervain (Verbena bonariensis); Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Frost aster (Symphyotrichum pilosum) with purple New England aster (Aster novae-angliae) and Brazilian vervain (Verbena bonariensis)

Frost aster (Symphyotrichum pilosum) with climbing asparagus (Asparagus verticillatus); Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Frost aster (Symphyotrichum pilosum) with climbing asparagus (Asparagus verticillatus)

Frost aster and the other little white asters are charming, but for rich color, you have to love the colorful New England asters (Symphyotrichum novae-angliae).

New England asters (Symphyotrichum novae-angliae) with Russian sage (Perovskia), 'Amazon Mist' sedge (Carex), silver ponyfoot (Dichondra argentea), and 'White Cloud' calamint (Calamintha); Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

New England asters (Symphyotrichum novae-angliae) with Russian sage (Perovskia), ‘Amazon Mist’ sedge (Carex), silver ponyfoot (Dichondra argentea), and ‘White Cloud’ calamint (Calamintha)

The various pinks are pretty, and the purples are gorgeous. Below is one of my original plants of ‘Hella Lacy’; most of the other purple-flowered clumps here are seedlings from this selection.

'Hella Lacy' New England aster (Symphyotrichum novae-angliae) with 'Gold Mound' spirea (Spiraea) and purple Japanese burnet (Sanguisorba tenuifolia 'Purpurea'); Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

‘Hella Lacy’ New England aster (Symphyotrichum novae-angliae) with ‘Gold Mound’ spirea (Spiraea) and purple Japanese burnet (Sanguisorba tenuifolia ‘Purpurea’)

Aromatic aster (S. oblongifolium) is another favorite. It’s more of a lavender-blue. but it too works well with a variety of other colors, and it has an interesting form and texture even when not in bloom.

Aromatic aster (Symphyotrichum oblongifolium) and pink New England aster (S. novae-angliae) with 'Flying Dragon' hardy orange (Poncirus trifoliata) and shredded umbrella plant (Syneilesis aconitifolia); Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Aromatic aster (Symphyotrichum oblongifolium) and pink New England aster (S. novae-angliae) with ‘Flying Dragon’ hardy orange (Poncirus trifoliata) and shredded umbrella plant (Syneilesis aconitifolia)

Smooth aster (S. laeve) is also charming: more open than aromatic asters and more compact than the New England asters.

'Bluebird' smooth aster (Symphyotrichum laeve); Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

‘Bluebird’ smooth aster (Symphyotrichum laeve)

Golden lace (Patrinia scabiosifolia), too, is a beauty this time of year. Many of my clumps are in seed by now, but I deadhead some of them in late August or early September so they’ll rebloom. They’re shorter, as you can see (compared to the untrimmed clumps on the right and left), but loaded with flowers at the same time that their leaves and stems are turning red.

Golden lace (Patrinia scabiosifolia); Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Golden lace (Patrinia scabiosifolia) in October bloom

Other dahlias have shown up in earlier Bloom Day posts, but ‘Bishop of Llandaff’ is the real star now for both flowers and foliage.

'Bishop of Llandaff' dahlia with 'Golden Sword' Adam's needle (Yucca filamentosa), cushion spurge (Euphorbia polychroma), and 'Sweet Georgia Heart Red' sweet potato vine (Ipomoea batatas); Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

‘Bishop of Llandaff’ dahlia with ‘Golden Sword’ Adam’s needle (Yucca filamentosa), cushion spurge (Euphorbia polychroma), and ‘Sweet Georgia Heart Red’ sweet potato vine (Ipomoea batatas)

Most of the colchicums are finished now, but the single white and double white Colchicum autumnale are the last to appear here.

Double white autumn crocus (Colchicum autumnale 'Alboplenum'); Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Double white autumn crocus (Colchicum autumnale ‘Alboplenum’)

‘Clarke’s Heavenly Blue’ morning glory (Ipomoea tricolor) really sulked during the dry weather, but it is lush and lovely now.

'Clarke's Heavenly Blue' morning glory (Ipomoea tricolor); Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

‘Clarke’s Heavenly Blue’ morning glory (Ipomoea tricolor)

Spanish flag (Mina lobata) is also delighted with the more comfortable growing conditions over the last month.

Spanish flag (Mina lobata); Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Spanish flag (Mina lobata)

The amaranths (Amaranthus) are terrific for height and color this time of year.

'Elephant Head' amaranth (Amaranthus) and 'Profusion Orange' zinnia; Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

‘Elephant Head’ amaranth (Amaranthus) and ‘Profusion Orange’ zinnia

Amaranthus 'Hopi Red Dye'; Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

‘Hopi Red Dye’ amaranth (Amaranthus)

Grasses, of course, are indispensable for fall interest, especially those with showy seedheads.

Prairie dropseed (Sporobolus heterolepis) with New England aster (Symphyotrichum novae-angliae); Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Prairie dropseed (Sporobolus heterolepis) with New England aster (Symphyotrichum novae-angliae)

Indian grass (Sorghastrum nutans) seedheads; Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Indian grass (Sorghastrum nutans) seedheads

Little bluestem (Schizachyrium scoparium) seedheads; Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Little bluestem (Schizachyrium scoparium) seedheads

'Dallas Blues' switch grass (Panicum virgatum) seedheads; Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

‘Dallas Blues’ switch grass (Panicum virgatum) seedheads

Bitter panic grass (Panicum amarum) and flame grass (Miscanthus 'Purpurascens'); Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Bitter panic grass (Panicum amarum) and flame grass (Miscanthus ‘Purpurascens’)

Flame grass (Miscanthus 'Purpurascens') and ghost bramble (Rubus thibetanus); Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Flame grass (Miscanthus ‘Purpurascens’) and ghost bramble (Rubus thibetanus)

Northern sea oats (Chasmanthium latifolium); Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Northern sea oats (Chasmanthium latifolium)

Korean feather reed grass (Calamagrostis brachytricha); Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Korean feather reed grass (Calamagrostis brachytricha)

'Karl Foerster' feather reed grass (Calamagrostis x acutiflora) with switch grass (Panicum virgatum) and 'Skyracer' purple moor grass (Molinia caerulea subsp. arundinacea); Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

‘Karl Foerster’ feather reed grass (Calamagrostis x acutiflora) with switch grass (Panicum virgatum) and ‘Skyracer’ purple moor grass (Molinia caerulea subsp. arundinacea)

Tufted hair grass (Deschampsia cespitosa); Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Tufted hair grass (Deschampsia cespitosa)

Quaking grass (Briza maxima); Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Greater quaking grass (Briza maxima)

Of course, grasses aren’t the only source of showy seedheads this time of year.

Tall thimbleweed (Anemone virginiana) seedheads; Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Tall thimbleweed (Anemone virginiana) seedheads

Northern blazing star (Liastris scariosa) seedhead; Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Northern blazing star (Liatris scariosa) seedhead

Joe-Pye weed (Eutrochium maculatum) seedhead against Virginia creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolius) in fall color; Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Joe-Pye weed (Eutrochium maculatum) seedhead against Virginia creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolius) in fall color

Culver's root (Veronicastrum virginicum) seedheads; Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Culver’s root (Veronicastrum virginicum) seedheads

Tuberous-rooted Jerusalem sage (Phlomis tuberosa) seedheads; Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Tuberous-rooted Jerusalem sage (Phlomis tuberosa) seedheads

Cardiocrinum cordatum seedpods; Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Cardiocrinum cordatum seedpods

False hemp (Datisca cannabina) in seed; Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

False hemp (Datisca cannabina) in seed

'Red Beauty' cotton (Gossypium) boll; Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

‘Red Beauty’ cotton (Gossypium) boll

I’m so excited that my daimyo (or Japanese emperor) oak made acorns for the first time. Aren’t those fuzzy caps adorable?

Daimyo oak (Quercus dentata) seeds; Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Daimyo oak (Quercus dentata) acorns

I harvested the remaining corn about 2 weeks ago.

Podcorn (Zea mays var. tunicata); Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Podcorn (Zea mays var. tunicata)

'Pignoletto Giallo' flint corn (Zea mays); Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

‘Pignoletto Giallo’ flint corn (Zea mays)

A friend (thanks, Clark!) sent me seeds for this pretty bean this summer, and it managed to produce quite a few pods even from the late planting. I really hope I can get it through the predicted frosts this weekend to get mature seed from it.

'Merveille de Venise' bean (Phaseolus vulgaris); Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

‘Merveille de Venise’ bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)

It was a really good year for the mini gourds, despite the dry spells. They self-sow every year and do an excellent job decorating the fence between the pasture and vegetable garden.

Mini gourds; Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Miniature gourds

Fall is the season for bright berries, too.

'Issai' purple beautyberry (Callicarpa dichotoma); Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

‘Issai’ purple beautyberry (Callicarpa dichotoma)

'Winter Gold' winterberry (Ilex verticillata); Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

‘Winter Gold’ winterberry (Ilex verticillata)

Eastern red cedar (Juniperus virginiana); Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Eastern red cedar (Juniperus virginiana)

'Brilliantissima' red chokeberry (Aronia arbutifolia); Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

‘Brilliantissima’ red chokeberry (Aronia arbutifolia)

'Flying Dragon' hardy orange (Poncirus trifoliata [Citrus trifoliata]); Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

‘Flying Dragon’ hardy orange (Poncirus trifoliata [Citrus trifoliata])

Blue-leaved rose (Rosa glauca) hips; Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Blue-leaved rose (Rosa glauca) hips

Fall foliage colors are almost at peak here, in the woods, hedgerows, and meadows as well as in the garden.

Hedgerow and meadow; Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

The hedgerow at Hayefield

Prairie dropseed (Sporobolus heterolepis) and stiff bluestar (Amsonia rigida) in fall color; Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Prairie dropseed (Sporobolus heterolepis) and stiff bluestar (Amsonia rigida) in fall color

'Blaze' little bluestem (Schizachyrium scoparium) with aromatic aster (Symphyotrichum oblongifolium) and 'Big Ears' lamb's ears (Stachys byzantina); Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

‘Blaze’ little bluestem (Schizachyrium scoparium) in fall color with aromatic aster (Symphyotrichum oblongifolium) and ‘Big Ears’ lamb’s ears (Stachys byzantina)

Big bluestem (Andropogon gerardii) in seed and fall color; Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Big bluestem (Andropogon gerardii) in fall color

'Huron Solstice' switch grass (Panicum virgatum) fall color; Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

‘Huron Solstice’ switch grass (Panicum virgatum) in fall color

'Cloud Nine' switch grass (Panicum virgatum) in fall color with Aster oblongifolius; Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

‘Cloud Nine’ switch grass (Panicum virgatum) in fall color

'Chameleon' spurge (Euphorbia dulcis) in fall color with New England aster (Symphyotrichum novae-angliae); Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

‘Chameleon’ spurge (Euphorbia dulcis) in fall color with New England aster (Symphyotrichum novae-angliae)

Shredded umbrella plant (Syneilesis aconitifolia) in fall color; Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Shredded umbrella plant (Syneilesis aconitifolia) in fall color with aromatic aster (Symphyotrichum oblongifolium)

If you knew how many hundreds of photos I’ve taken over the past month, you’d appreciate my restraint in picking out just a sampling of my favorite garden shots and vignettes. Every day brings new colors, and things vary even over the course of each day, as the light changes.

Front Path in October; Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Front garden at Hayefield

Front Garden Middle Path; Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Front garden middle path at mid-day

Front Garden in late afternoon light; Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Front garden in late afternoon light

Front garden vignette with 'Sun Power' hosta, dwarf fleeceflower (Persicaria affinis), plantain-leaved sedge (Carex plantaginea), Japanese maple (Acer palmatum), 'Hella Lacy' New England aster (Symphyotrichum novae-angliae), and 'Gerald Darby' iris (Iris x robusta); Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Front garden vignette with ‘Sun Power’ hosta, dwarf fleeceflower (Persicaria affinis), plantain-leaved sedge (Carex plantaginea), Japanese maple (Acer palmatum), ‘Hella Lacy’ New England aster (Symphyotrichum novae-angliae), and ‘Gerald Darby’ iris (Iris x robusta)

Front garden corner with 'Hella Lacy' New England aster (Symphyotrichum novae-angliae) and 'Isla Gold' tansy (Tanacetum vulgare 'Isla Gold'); Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Front garden corner with ‘Hella Lacy’ New England aster (Symphyotrichum novae-angliae) and ‘Isla Gold’ tansy (Tanacetum vulgare ‘Isla Gold’)

Side Garden in mid-October; Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Side garden in mid-October

Side Garden in mid-October; Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Side garden in mid-October

Side Garden in mid-October; Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Side Garden in mid-October

Side Garden in mid-October; Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Side garden in mid-October

Side garden arbor in mid-October; Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Side garden arbor in mid-October

Happy Garden and back path in mid-October; Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Happy Garden and back path in mid-October

Back garden corner with Sedum alboroseum 'Medio-variegatum', 'All Gold' lemon balm (Melissa officinalis), 'Prairie Munchkin' little bluestem (Schizachyrium scoparium), New England aster (Symphyotrichum novae-angliae), Korean feather reed grass (Calamagrostis brachytricha), and daimyo oak (Quercus dentata); Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Back garden corner with Sedum alboroseum ‘Medio-variegatum’, ‘All Gold’ lemon balm (Melissa officinalis), ‘Prairie Munchkin’ little bluestem (Schizachyrium scoparium), New England aster (Symphyotrichum novae-angliae), Korean feather reed grass (Calamagrostis brachytricha), and daimyo oak (Quercus dentata)

Courtyard in mid-October; Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Courtyard in mid-October

The Shrubbery in mid-October; Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

The Shrubbery in mid-October

And to finish, an assortment of pathway pictures…just because.

Front garden path; Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Front garden gravel and timber-and-gravel path

Side garden timber-and-gravel path; Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Side garden timber-and-gravel path

Courtyard fieldstone path; Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Courtyard fieldstone path

Courtyard fieldstone path; Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Courtyard fieldstone path

Courtyard fieldstone path; Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Courtyard fieldstone path

Grass path in front garden; Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Front garden grass path

Grass path in side garden; Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Side garden grass path

Side garden log-round path; Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Side garden log-round path

Side garden bark path; Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Side garden bark path

Back Garden Path; Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Back garden bark path in October

Whew! I could probably do several most posts just of fall pics over the next few weeks, but right now, I need to concentrate on seeds.

Seeds ready for cleaning; Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

Lots are already cleaned, but there are still loads to work through, and then the list to compile. Next post: seed giveaway on November 15th! In the meantime, enjoy the splendor of other fall gardens at Carol’s main Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day post at May Dreams Gardens.

Cleaned seeds; Nancy J. Ondra at Hayefield

28 responses to this post.

  1. Posted by Inger Cesar on October 15, 2015 at 4:48 am

    Lovely pictures! It has been a lovely Autumn in Sweden to, a little bit of frost in some mornings but the most of the flowers is still fine.
    How old are your Quercus dentata now when you got nuts for the first time?
    Have a nice day! (:D

    Good morning, Inger! It’s good to hear that you’ve been enjoying a lovely autumn too. My Quercus dentata is 13 or 14 years old now, I think; planted it when it was just a foot or so tall. It’s a quick grower.
    -Nan

  2. Oh how I look forward to seeing your garden each month!
    I am glad to see you featured your Crimson Beauty fleeceflower. I am considering placing one in my garden. After some internet research, I am a little hesitant because some sights warn about the invasiveness, yet others assure that it isn’t. What has been your experience with it?
    This year I added several different sedge, (carex) grasses to my landscaping. I love the texture they have added! Since I didn’t want to lose them over the winter, I dug up all but one to keep in my garage over the winter. My internet research leads me to believe they are marginally hardy in my 6b 7a garden, so I left one in the ground as an experiment. I assume your climate is similar to mine in Roanoke VA. How do you treat yours for the winter?
    Thanks for sharing your garden and your knowledge with us!
    Debbie

    Hi there, Debbie. I’ll warn you that ‘Crimson Beauty’ gets HUGE over time. The friend who shared some with me had a clump that was easily 7 feet tall and 10 feet across. In my experience, it is not invasive, and I don’t even know that I’d call it aggressive: established clumps can expand a foot or more in each direction every year, but that’s not unreasonable based on the proportions of the plant. I now remove about half of the stems at the base in early summer to reduce its vigor somewhat and make it a bit more see-through. It’s a little extra work, but I wouldn’t be without the plant.

    Sedges have many different hardiness ranges. Many kinds are hardy for me, but some aren’t. If you want to email me directly (nan at hayefield dot com), we can discuss the ones you have.
    -Nan

  3. Posted by Susan Gilmour on October 15, 2015 at 7:00 am

    Ever cool Oak! Love the leaves too. So neat when you’ve waited and watched. Love that about the gardens. I had a 15 year wait for my tulip tree to bloom! Hard to believe another fall season is upon us., it shocks me when I realize it. We haven’t had a hard frost here in Nova Scotia yet which is unusual for us but I’m not complaining!! Hubby sprinkles everything for me when we have a light frost(I broke my leg so can’t do a few gardening things for awhile, just glad it didn’t happen in spring). Love all your colourful combos, always giving me great ideas. That’s alot of seeds and work, hopefully a labour of love. Happy “B” Day to the boys, they are looking very festive! TTFN…Sue

    How amazing that you have been spared frost so far, Sue; that’s terrific! I’m so sorry to hear that you are laid up, but I hope you’re still getting to enjoy your garden (and how nice that you have someone to supervise). Take care!
    -Nan

  4. Your garden never ceases to amaze me. So much to see and enjoy. I see countless plants I would like to incorporate into my garden. I have had so much trouble with morning glory being an invasive plant I cringe when I see it in other peoples garden. Happy Birthday to Duncan and Daniel. They look quite festive with their birthday boas and feathered caps. My fall is dry. I can’t say it has been too happy for me. I am worried about how this drought will affect the winter garden. I can’t worry about it. What ever will be will be. Happy GBBD.

    I feel for your worries, Lisa. I was in the same position until we were blessed with 3.5 inches of rain around the beginning of the month. It made a big difference after the dry conditions of August and September. Maybe you’ll get some soon? I know what you mean about morning glories–‘Grandpa Otts’ has made himself quite at home around the cottage shed out back–but ‘Clarke’s Heavenly Blue’ rarely sets seed for me. I kind of wish it *would* seed around.
    -Nan

  5. Posted by Alana on October 15, 2015 at 7:29 am

    Beautiful Nancy! I am already looking forward to the next growing season.
    I have harvested ‘Tiger Cub’ corn. If you still want some let me know.
    Alana

    Yes, Alana; thank you! I will email you this afternoon.
    -Nan

  6. Posted by Liz dutton on October 15, 2015 at 7:43 am

    I get lost staring at your beautiful garden photos! Thank you!

    Hey there, Liz! Good to hear from you. Thanks for visiting!
    -Nan

  7. Posted by Allan Robinson on October 15, 2015 at 7:44 am

    Lovely to have a tour around your beautiful Garden Nan, the autumn colours are amazing. I am, as you may know a fan of grasses, especially since visiting your blogs. I therefore particularly love the Miscanthus Purpurascens, your pairing it wth the ghost bramble is just sublime. So far we are having a very dry mild Autumn in NW England, no frost as yet. Happy belated birthday to the boys.

    The Miscanthus ‘Purpurascens’ is pretty nondescript for most of the year, but its fall color and fluffy plumes really make it a standout now, don’t they? May you be spared frost for a while longer so you can keep enjoying your lovely garden. (The boys say thank you, by the way, and send their greetings to you and your furry friends.)
    -Nan

  8. Posted by christine on October 15, 2015 at 8:36 am

    beautiful pictures! your garden always looks so lush and so pretty with all the different foliage and plants! love it :)

    Thanks, Christine! I really didn’t expect “lush” to be part of this fall’s show, but once again, the plants came through.
    -Nan

  9. Posted by Kathleen Caldara on October 15, 2015 at 8:49 am

    Nan, as usual, your photos are great! Isn’t nature simply gorgeous?

    It really is, Kathleen; what a joy to see the beauty everywhere this time of year. Happy Bloom Day to you!
    -Nan

  10. Your Autumn garden is very colorful. I didn’t think the growing season there was long enough to grow cotton.

    It’s not ideal here for cotton, for sure, but if I start the seeds on heat indoors and wait until it’s dependably warm to set them in the garden, I can usually get one or two bolls. I really wanted lots of seed this year, though, so the plants have been growing in large pots in the greenhouse. It’s stunning to see them loaded with fluff!
    -Nan

  11. As always, the best fall views on the web are here at Hayefield! The grasses, the asters, the late blooming annuals, the seeds, the berries..I love it all! All your hard work paying off once more! Love the picture of the Courtyard framed by the wooden gate!

    Thanks so much for stopping by, Daniela. It’s funny how the paths really called out for photos this time–even the new grass paths, which have really come along in the past month.
    -Nan

  12. Posted by Patty on October 15, 2015 at 9:51 am

    The usual joy to peruse your photos over my morning coffee, Nan. Loved seeing the boys in all their adornment!

    I’ve been intrigued with ‘Flying Dragon’ for a while now. Do you make use of the fruit, and if so, how tasty is it? -Patty

    Hah – the boys were amused at seeing each other adorned but didn’t seem to realize that they were adorned themselves; just as well, really. Photo shoots are not easy with them.

    The hardy orange fruit is…well, I nibbled a bit once and will never be tempted again. I just let it drop, which is a bit of a problem, as the seeds then germinate and need to be pulled out before they develop serious thorns. I advise keeping the plant limbed up a bit so you can get around the base of it for weeding without being impaled.
    -Nan

  13. Posted by JessB on October 15, 2015 at 9:55 am

    Stunning, just stunning. I love collecting seeds too. Just something magical about them.

    Don’t small envelopes bulging with seeds make you feel rich? All that bounty just waiting to be gathered..it’s hard to resist.
    -Nan

  14. The flint corn on the kale is brilliant –the color and the idea. Also the Poncirus really looks nice. Now I’m really excited to see my little one when its big and fruiting.

    Thanks – that corn is so pretty and textural that it deserved a special background.

    Though, as I mentioned in another comment, the thorns of the hardy orange make growing it a bit perilous, it’s hard to ask for more in the way of year-round interest. Fragrant flowers, glossy leaves, beautiful fall color, and quirky, rich green stems all winter: it has it all. Best wishes for speedy growth on yours!
    -Nan

  15. I love your pictures! Your garden looks fantastic!

    Greetings, Sofie #26

    Hello, Sophie! Thanks for stopping by today. I hope you’re having lots of fun with your garden and your blog.
    -Nan

  16. Thank you for adding joy to my day! Photos were absolutely stunning.

    It was my pleasure, Mary. Things look even prettier today than they did earlier this week. I’m planning to enjoy it as much as possible. Hope you’re able to get outside too!
    -Nan

  17. Posted by Fancy Fox on October 15, 2015 at 11:53 am

    Fall took a long time coming this year, but the trees are blazing with all shades of yellow, orange, red – and green. Spectacular against a clear blue sky.

    Do you know Symphyotrichum ericoides ‘Blue Star’? Photos really don’t do this aster justice. It’s just coming into full bloom for me here in Ontario, Canada (USDA Zone 4b), a cloud of light lavender flowers on tall, fully befoliaged stems. And not a stake in sight – though a ring of some sort comes in handy if it doesn’t have other plants on which to lean. It’s in the same eyeshot as several pink/purple phlox, a couple of blue-flowered monkshood, and the structured foliage of carexes (C. muskingumensis, C. grayi) and several ferns, and ties them all together. ‘Blue Star’ might be a good addition to your collection of asters…

    Thanks for the info on ‘Blue Star’. No, I hadn’t heard of it, but it sounds really lovely, especially as you’ve used it. I’ll have to keep an eye out. Of course, I’d probably end up pulling it out in spring, thinking it’s just one of the ordinary ones….
    -Nan

  18. Posted by Nada Bulus on October 15, 2015 at 2:20 pm

    What a treat! Thank you for the amazing tour and thank you for the photo of the boys in their celebratory boas :)

    You’re very kind, Nada. The boys and I thank you in return for visiting with us on this most beautiful of Bloom Days!
    -Nan

  19. Posted by Paula on October 15, 2015 at 3:19 pm

    I think I could spend hours on your courtyard paths, such beauty calls for major meandering. Lovely fall in your garden, the quality of light exquisite, garnishes everything with a little extra gold. A joy to see the plants reveling in those autumnal bursts of sun. Happy b-day to the boys.
    Thanks for sharing your garden.

    “Meandering” is definitely the order of the day, Paula. I think this may be our most beautiful fall ever. May you enjoy the same in your part of the world.
    -Nan

  20. Wow, just wow. I don’t even know what to write. I’ll have to come back several times to ponder this post which makes me happy. The boys made me laugh. Thank you. Happy Bloom Day. See you for seeds next month. I gathered the seeds for both four o’clocks today, and while my garden isn’t making many seedheads yet, I’ll look around for anything else that’s special.~~Dee

    A very happy Bloom Day back to you, Dee. It was so thoughtful of you to offer those four-o’clocks. It’s fun to be excited about next year before this one is even over!
    -Nan

  21. I’m always pleased to see a colchicum make the cut. Is that Crimson Beauty fleeceflower a cultivar of Japanese bamboo, which at one time was known as Fallopia japonica?

    Not just any colchicum, Kathy, but one of your gifts. It depends who you ask about the nomenclature of ‘Crimson Beauty’, I think; I’ve read a number of conflicting reports.
    -Nan

  22. Nan,

    Thank you, another wonderful and informative post. There are so many great images. One in particular, stood out with great appeal to me: “Karl Foerster’ feather reed grass with switch grass and ‘Skyracer’ purple moor grass.” I loved everything about that photo. The composition, lighting and cropping were perfect. Thank you for sharing.

    John Drexel

    Hey there, John. That’s a favorite of mine too. Normally I don’t shoot on windy days, but at this time of year, it’s a delight to catch the grasses when they’re dancing in the breeze. All the best to you and the family!
    -Nan

  23. Posted by Sherry Park on October 15, 2015 at 10:27 pm

    Fall is, for me, the best of everything possible….I hope your days are filled with Joy….Thank You.

    Sherry Park

    That’s lovely, Sherry. I guess it has to be this good to get us through the dreary winter months, until we can look forward to spring again.
    -Nan

  24. The boys look as fetching in their birthday finery as your wonderful garden does in its autumn colors. I especially love the asters, although I haven’t had much luck with any other that Aster frikartii in my southern California garden – they seem to want more water than I can provide them under current conditions. Best wishes with your seed inventory. I look forward to more fall pics!

    Yes, I’m sure you’re right about the moisture conditions. All of the asters I have, except for S. oblongifolius and Aster tataricus, are as common in fields and on roadsides around here as they are in my garden, so they’re clearly well adapted to our more abundant rainfall.
    -Nan

  25. Posted by Barbara Dashwoood on October 17, 2015 at 11:21 am

    Thanks for the beautiful fall tour of your garden, Nan. Hope you get some time with your beverage of choice to just sit back and enjoy in the differing light conditions. Overnight lows creeping down here in Victoria, BC.but still near or in double digits. A few butterflies, dragon flies and lizards still jubilating in the autumnal sun.
    Barbara

    Hi Barbara! Not much sitting here today, but plenty of jubilating going on. The boys and I took advantage of the beautiful morning to go on a long ramble, and since we got back, I’ve been running around digging up tender plants, gathering flowers, collecting seeds, and spreading covers in preparation for tonight’s frost. It’ll be sad to see the annuals go. I hope you keep enjoying mild weather!
    -Nan

  26. Sis, you are amazing! You have truly changed the way I look at gardens in the fall. Instead of thinking about how much work I have to get ready for winter, I want to enjoy all the textures and colors for as long as possible! You are an amazing gardener and a wonderful sister!

    Hey, you! It’s really cool of you to say that. The cutting-back part will come soon enough, I’m afraid. We had a hard freeze last night; hope you were spared.
    -Nan

  27. Your garden looks lovely and colorful as usual. The boys look like they are enjoying being all decked out. I like all your different Asters and the Persicaria Crimson Beauty is amazing! The Aster laevis I got from your seed sharing was about to bloom this year but a deer ate most of the buds and broke off the tall stems, but then I brought the stems in and was able to photograph a few blooms, plus I’m trying to root them. Thanks for sharing them with me.

    Grr…rotten deer! Glad that you got to see a few blooms anyway. I should add the smooth aster to my seed-collection list again this year; thanks for the reminder!
    -Nan

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