Better Together: Herbs – Part 1

'Provence' lavender (Lavandula x intermedia) with Mexican feather grass (Stipa tenuissima) at Hayefield.com

‘Provence’ lavender (Lavandula x intermedia) with Mexican feather grass (Stipa tenuissima)

Surely it can’t still be winter? And yet, it clearly is–outside, anyway. In here, I’ve been immersed in my photo archives for the last few days, picking out photos of plant combinations for the book I’m working on. Revisiting the digital highlights of the last decade has reminded me of some plants and pairings I’d like to try again, including some old favorites that I’ve neglected over the past few years.

I still have herbs on my mind from my last post, so I decided to separate out a bunch of herb combination photos, in the hope that you too might enjoy thinking about these fragrant and flavorful beauties. There are a lot of them, so it made sense to focus only on lavenders, thymes, sages, and basils this time. Above is one of my all-time-favorite pairings: spiky ‘Provence’ lavender (Lavandula x intermedia) with wispy Mexican feather grass (Stipa tenuissima).

'Provence' lavender (Lavandula x intermedia) with 'Hummelo' betony (Stachys), 'Black Adder' anise hyssop (Agastache), and Creme de Mint Tatarian dogwood (Cornus alba 'Crimzam') at Hayefield.com

‘Provence’ lavender (Lavandula x intermedia) with ‘Hummelo’ betony (Stachys), ‘Black Adder’ anise hyssop (Agastache), and Creme de Mint Tatarian dogwood (Cornus alba ‘Crimzam’)

Lavenders generally aren’t thrilled about living here: They’re all right during the growing season, but the winter wet often does them in. I’ve had pretty good luck with ‘Provence’, though, and can usually get two or even three years out of a clump. Above is another ‘Provence’ combination, with some ‘Hummelo’ betony (Stachys) in the background and ‘Black Adder’ anise hyssop (Agastache) and a young plant of Creme de Mint Tatarian dogwood (Cornus alba ‘Crimzam’) in the front.

'Berggarten' sage (Salvia officinalis) with 'Grey Lady Plymouth' scented geranium (Pelargonium) and 'Hidcote' English lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) at Hayefield.com

‘Berggarten’ sage (Salvia officinalis) with ‘Grey Lady Plymouth’ scented geranium (Pelargonium) and ‘Hidcote’ English lavender (Lavandula angustifolia)

I usually don’t bother buying other “hardy” lavenders, but every few years, I start a packet of English lavender (L. angustifolia) seed, plant out a dozen or so seedlings, and appreciate whatever survives the first winter. The photo above features one from a packet of ‘Hidcote’, planted with ‘Berggarten’ sage (Salvia officinalis) and ‘Grey Lady Plymouth’ scented geranium (Pelargonium) in a deliciously scented trio. Below is another English lavender seedling in front of Chinese forget-me-not (Cynoglossum amabile) and ‘Kosmic’ kale.

English lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) with Chinese forget-me-not (Cynoglossum amabile) against 'Kosmic' kale at Hayefield.com

English lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) with Chinese forget-me-not (Cynoglossum amabile) against the variegated leaves of ‘Kosmic’ kale

I also like to start a batch of common thyme (Thymus vulgaris)–and rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis), too–every few years. When the seedlings are about 1 inch tall, I pot up 3 seedlings each into 2-inch pots, then plant them out in early summer. Pinetree Garden Seeds sells a pack of 350 common thyme seeds for $1.50: more than enough for planting closely as an edging or as fillers around taller plants.

Common thyme (Thymus vulgaris) with nasturtiums (Tropaeolum majus), pot marigolds (Calendula officinalis), and rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) at Hayefield.com

Common thyme (Thymus vulgaris) with nasturtiums (Tropaeolum majus), pot marigolds (Calendula officinalis), and rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis)

Above is a mini-hedge of common thyme and a taller line of rosemary seedlings, with nasturtiums (Tropaeolum majus) and pot marigolds (Calendula officinalis) in between. Below is common thyme interplanted with white Spanish bluebell (Hyacinthoides hispanica ‘Alba’).

Common thyme (Thymus vulgaris) with white Spanish bluebell (Hyacinthoides hispanica 'Alba') at Hayefield.com

Common thyme (Thymus vulgaris) with white Spanish bluebell (Hyacinthoides hispanica ‘Alba’)

While the common thyme plants usually fizzle out by the third year, creeping thyme (T. serpyllum) lasts much longer and spreads nicely. If I want more, I just move a piece to where it’s needed. It makes a nice groundcover around small succulents.

Creeping thyme (Thymus praecox Coccineus Group) with Spanish stonecrop (Sedum hispanicum), coppertone stonecrop (S. nussbaumerianum), and 'Bronze' graptosedum (x Graptosedum) at Hayefield.com

Creeping thyme (Thymus praecox Coccineus Group) with Spanish stonecrop (Sedum hispanicum), coppertone stonecrop (S. nussbaumerianum), and ‘Bronze’ graptosedum (x Graptosedum)

When I set out succulents that are tender here, such as the orangey coppertone sedum (Sedum nussbaumerianum) and pinkish brown ‘Bronze’ graptosedum (x Graptosedum) above, I just pull back the thyme a bit to make room for them. Creeping thyme also mingles well with hardy creeping sedums, such as Spanish stonecrop (Sedum hispanicum)–shown below with both plants in bloom, plus lamb’s ears (Stachys byzantina).

Creeping thyme (Thymus praecox Coccineus Group) with Spanish stonecrop (Sedum hispanicum), and lamb's ears (Stachys byzantina) at Hayefield.com

Creeping thyme (Thymus praecox Coccineus Group) with Spanish stonecrop (Sedum hispanicum) and lamb’s ears (Stachys byzantina)

Bushy lemon thymes (Thymus citriodorus) also perform rather well here. Below is a variegated form called silver thyme (‘Argenteus’), with a thin white edge on each leaf.

Silver thyme (Thymus citriodorus 'Argenteus') and creeping rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis 'Prostratus') and Chinese dunce cap (Orostachys iwarenge) at Hayefield.com

Silver thyme (Thymus citriodorus ‘Argenteus’) and creeping rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis ‘Prostratus’) and Chinese dunce cap (Orostachys iwarenge)

Silver thyme is attractive in leaf and even prettier in bloom. Above, it’s in a container with creeping rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis ‘Prostratus’) and Chinese dunce cap (Orostachys iwarenge). Below is a different view of the same container, showing the silver thyme and creeping rosemary with Corsican stonecrop (S. dasyphyllum ‘Major’).

Silver thyme (Thymus citriodorus 'Argenteus') and creeping rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis 'Prostratus') with Corsican stonecrop (Sedum dasyphyllum 'Major') at Hayefield.com

Silver thyme (Thymus citriodorus ‘Argenteus’) and creeping rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis ‘Prostratus’) with Corsican stonecrop (Sedum dasyphyllum ‘Major’)

Two thymes that are particularly vigorous here are variegated lemon thyme (T. citriodorus ‘Variegatus’)–the bushy one at the back in the picture below, with a thin yellow leaf edge–and creeping ‘Yellow Transparent’–the yellow-green one in the foreground. (The shot below is from late August; in spring, ‘Yellow Transparent’ is much more yellow.)

'Transparent Yellow' thyme (Thymus) and variegated lemon thyme (T. citriodorus 'Variegatus') with 'Bronze' graptosedum (x Graptosedum), blue echeveria (Echeveria glauca) and 'Aztec Gold' creeping speedwell (Veronica prostrata) at Hayefield.com

‘Transparent Yellow’ thyme (Thymus) and variegated lemon thyme (T. citriodorus ‘Variegatus’) with ‘Bronze’ graptosedum (x Graptosedum), blue echeveria (Echeveria glauca), and ‘Aztec Gold’ creeping speedwell (Veronica prostrata)

‘Yellow Transparent’ is sold under a number of other names as well, including ‘Transparent Yellow’, ‘Transparent Gold’, ‘Clear Yellow’, and ‘Aureus’, and under T. vulgaris, T. x pulegioides, and T. serpyllum. It’s so vigorous that it can grow right over smaller succulents, so I occasionally have to do a bit of clipping to keep it in balance. Above it’s with more of the ‘Bronze’ graptosedum, blue echeveria (Echeveria glauca), and some ‘Aztec Gold’ creeping speedwell (Veronica prostrata).

'Elfin' creeping thyme (Thymus serpyllum) and Chinese dunce cap (Orostachys iwarenge) at Hayefield.com

‘Elfin’ creeping thyme (Thymus serpyllum) and Chinese dunce cap (Orostachys iwarenge)

Tiny-leaved ‘Elfin’ creeping thyme (T. serpyllum) has done very well in that same slightly-raised bed. It spreads out at a relatively good clip, but it’s so diminutive that it creeps around even small companions, rather than over them.

'Elfin' creeping thyme (Thymus serpyllum) and variegated lemon thyme (T. citriodorus 'Variegatus') with succulents at Hayefield.com

‘Elfin’ creeping thyme (Thymus serpyllum) and variegated lemon thyme (T. citriodorus ‘Variegatus’) with succulents

Above is ‘Elfin’ creeping thyme and variegated lemon thyme with more succulents. (I think the main one above is an x Pachyveria; there’s also some ‘Bronze graptosedum and blue echeveria.)

Woolly thyme (Thymus pseudolanuginosus) with 'Snow Flurry' heath aster (Symphyotrichum ericoides f. prostratus) at Hayefield.com

Woolly thyme (Thymus pseudolanuginosus) with ‘Snow Flurry’ heath aster (Symphyotrichum ericoides f. prostratum)

Woolly thyme (T. psuedolanuginosus) comes and goes here. It’ll be happy for a few years, spreading to make a patch several feet across if it has the room; then it will almost disappear before regenerating from a few remaining sprigs. It doesn’t seem to make a difference whether it’s in a raised position–as shown above, mingling with ‘Snow Flurry’ heath aster (Symphyotrichum ericoides f. prostratum) on a low stone wall–or right at ground level–as shown below, pooling around the base of ‘Provence’ lavender.

Woolly thyme (Thymus pseudolanuginosus) with 'Provence' lavender (Lavandula x intermedia) at Hayefield.com

Woolly thyme (Thymus pseudolanuginosus) with ‘Provence’ lavender (Lavandula x intermedia)

During the growing season, woolly thyme is a cool gray-green that works well with lots of other colors. Below it’s with fall-colored October daphne (Sedum sieboldii).

Woolly thyme (Thymus pseudolanuginosus) with October daphne (Sedum sieboldii) at Hayefield.com

Woolly thyme (Thymus pseudolanuginosus) with October daphne (Sedum sieboldii)

When cold weather settles in for the winter, woolly thyme takes on a soft purplish blush. Below, it’s in a gravel path, at the base of a dormant clump of Mexican feather grass (Stipa tenuissima).

Woolly thyme (Thymus pseudolanuginosus) with Mexican feather grass (Stipa tenuissima) at Hayefield.com

Woolly thyme (Thymus pseudolanuginosus) in winter with Mexican feather grass (Stipa tenuissima)

Sages (Salvia) also offer some lovely foliage options. The gray-green of regular culinary sage (S. officinalis) is nice for color, and it’s easy to start the seeds, but I prefer to pick up a few small pots of ‘Berggarten’ each spring. Its leaves are broader and tend to be more silvery when it get lots of sun, so it’s much more interesting as a foliage accent.

'Berggarten' sage (Salvia officinalis) with lemon thyme (Thyme citriodorus) at Hayefield.com

‘Berggarten’ sage (Salvia officinalis) with lemon thyme (Thyme citriodorus)

‘Berggarten’ has a very distinctive appearance and makes a beautiful partner for rich green leaves, like those of lemon thyme (above) or rosemary (below).

'Berggarten' sage (Salvia officinalis) with rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) at Hayefield.com

‘Berggarten’ sage (Salvia officinalis) with rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis)

Texturally, ‘Berggarten’ contrasts well with tiny leaves, and with grassy or strappy leaves too, like those of ‘Kwanso Variegated’ daylily (Hemerocallis fulva).

'Berggarten' sage (Salvia officinalis) with 'Variegated Kwanso' daylily (Hemerocallis fulva) at Hayefield.com

‘Berggarten’ sage (Salvia officinalis) with ‘Variegated Kwanso’ daylily (Hemerocallis fulva)

‘Berggarten’ has about a 60 percent chance of overwintering here (about the same as regular culinary sage). The variegated culinary sages won’t make it at all, but they’re so pretty that I don’t mind buying a new plant of each every spring.

Golden variegated sage (Salvia officinalis 'Icterina') with common thyme (Thymus vulgaris) at Hayefield.com

Golden variegated sage (Salvia officinalis ‘Icterina’) with common thyme (Thymus vulgaris)

It’s easy to make great combinations with golden variegated sage (S. officinalis ‘Icterina’). Try it with whites or soft yellows, or with blues and purples. ‘Tricolor’, with green, white, and pink in the leaves, is lovely with white or pink flowers.

'Tricolor' sage (Salvia officinalis 'Tricolor') with 'Wine' African Daisy (Arctotis) at Hayefield.com

‘Tricolor’ sage (Salvia officinalis ‘Tricolor’) with ‘Wine’ African Daisy (Arctotis)

Another must-have sage for foliage interest–and flowers and fragrance, too–is ‘Golden Delicious’ pineapple sage (Salvia elegans). It’s completely tender here, but it grows quickly from a small pot planted out in late May, forming bushy, 3- to 5-foot-tall clumps of bright yellow foliage.

'Golden Delicious' pineapple sage (Salvia elegans) with peppermint geranium (Pelargonium tomentosum) and 'Keystone Kopper' coleus (Solenostemon scutellarioides) at Hayefield.com

‘Golden Delicious’ pineapple sage (Salvia elegans) with peppermint geranium (Pelargonium tomentosum) and ‘Keystone Kopper’ coleus (Solenostemon scutellarioides)

It does bloom, with sprays of bright red blooms in October, but for most of the growing season, it’s a fantastic foliage accent.

'Golden Delicious' pineapple sage (Salvia elegans) with 'Black Velvet Red' zonal geranium (Pelargonium x hortorum), 'Purple Knight' alternanthera (Alternanthera dentata), 'Red Spider' zinnia (Zinnia tenuifolia), Canna indica 'Purpurea', and Vertigo fountain grass (Pennisetum purpureum 'Tift 8') at Hayefield.com

‘Golden Delicious’ pineapple sage (Salvia elegans) with ‘Black Velvet Red’ zonal geranium (Pelargonium x hortorum), ‘Purple Knight’ alternanthera (Alternanthera dentata), ‘Red Spider’ zinnia (Zinnia tenuifolia), Canna indica ‘Purpurea’, and Vertigo fountain grass (Pennisetum purpureum ‘Tift 8’)

The greenish yellow foliage works well with lots of other colors, but I usually end up pairing it with reds or oranges. Above is an early-August, dark-and-light combo of annuals and tender perennials: ‘Golden Delicious’ pineapple sage contrasted with ‘Purple Knight’ alternanthera (Alternanthera dentata), Canna indica ‘Purpurea’, and Vertigo fountain grass (Pennisetum purpureum ‘Tift 8’) and accented with touches of red from ‘Black Velvet Red’ zonal geranium (Pelargonium x hortorum) and ‘Red Spider’ zinnia (Zinnia tenuifolia).

Below is an early-September shot of ‘Golden Delicious’ with ‘Profusion Orange’ zinnia, ‘Sweet Caroline Bronze’ sweet potato vine (Ipomoea batatas), ‘All Gold’ lemon balm (Melissa officinalis), and Mellow Yellow spirea (Spiraea thunbergii ‘Ogon’).

'Golden Delicious' pineapple sage (Salvia elegans) with 'Profusion Orange' zinnia, 'Sweet Caroline Bronze' sweet potato vine (Ipomoea batatas), 'All Gold' lemon balm (Melissa officinalis), and Mellow Yellow spirea (Spiraea thunbergii 'Ogon') at Hayefield.com

‘Golden Delicious’ pineapple sage (Salvia elegans) with ‘Profusion Orange’ zinnia, ‘Sweet Caroline Bronze’ sweet potato vine (Ipomoea batatas), ‘All Gold’ lemon balm (Melissa officinalis), and Mellow Yellow spirea (Spiraea thunbergii ‘Ogon’)

Basils (Ocimum) are another of my favorites: for flavor, in the case of regular sweet basil, and for beauty, in the case of those with interesting foliage. The neatly mounded form and tiny leaves of ‘Pistou’, for instance, make it a really cute annual edging plant. Below, it’s with ‘Lemon Gem’ marigold (Tagetes tenuifolia) and ‘Rubine’ Brussels sprouts.

'Pistou' basil (Ocimum basilicum) with 'Lemon Gem' marigolds (Tagetes tenuifolia) and 'Rubine' Brussels sprouts at Hayefield.com

‘Pistou’ basil (Ocimum basilicum) with ‘Lemon Gem’ marigolds (Tagetes tenuifolia) and ‘Rubine’ Brussels sprouts

‘Pistou’ is easy to start from seed, so you can have plenty of seedlings to play with for just a few dollars. ‘Pesto Perpetou’, on the other hand, is one that you have to buy as a started plant each year. It’s worth it, though, for the handsome, columnar form and showily variegated foliage.

'Pest Perpetuo' basil (Ocimum) with alpine strawberry (Fragaria vesca) and 'Black Adder' anise hyssop (Agastache) at Hayefield.com

‘Pesto Perpetuo’ basil (Ocimum) with alpine strawberry (Fragaria vesca) and ‘Black Adder’ anise hyssop (Agastache)

Above is ‘Pesto Perpetuo’ in front of ‘Black Adder’ anise hyssop (Agastache) and underplanted with alpine strawberries (Fragaria vesca); below, it’s with ‘Souvenir d’Andre Chaudron’ catmint (Nepeta sibirica).

'Pesto Perpetuo' basil (Ocimum) with 'Souvenir d'Andre Chaudron' catmint (Nepeta sibirica) at Hayefield.com

‘Pesto Perpetuo’ basil (Ocimum) with ‘Souvenir d’Andre Chaudron’ catmint (Nepeta sibirica)

‘African Blue’ is nice as a foliage accent at first, with dark stems and purple-blushed leaves; then, the flowers take over the show for the rest of the season. You don’t have to worry about clipping them off, because ‘African Blue’ doesn’t set seed; it just keeps branching and blooming. In the shot below, I have it paired with purple heart (Setcreasea pallida) to pick up the stem color and ‘Big Ears’ lamb’s ears (Stachys byzantina) for some textural contrast.

Basil 'African Blue' (Ocimum) with purple heart (Setcreasea pallida) and 'Big Ears' lamb's ears (Stachys byzantina) at Hayefield.com

Basil ‘African Blue’ (Ocimum) with purple heart (Setcreasea pallida) and ‘Big Ears’ lamb’s ears (Stachys byzantina)

Going back to the easy-from-seed basils…I wouldn’t miss starting a packet of some purple basil each spring, for use as fillers wherever I need dark leaves.

'Osmin' basil (Ocimum basilicum) with 'Limelight' four o'clock (Mirabilis jalapa), 'Burgundy Giant' fountain grass (Pennisetum), and golden elderberry (Sambucus nigra 'Aurea') at Hayefield.com

‘Osmin’ basil (Ocimum basilicum) with ‘Limelight’ four o’clock (Mirabilis jalapa), ‘Burgundy Giant’ fountain grass (Pennisetum), and golden elderberry (Sambucus nigra ‘Aurea’)

‘Osmin’ is one that’s dependably dark. Above is an early-July shot of it with ‘Limelight’ four-o’clock (Mirabilis jalapa), ‘Burgundy Giant’ fountain grass (Pennisetum), and golden elderberry (Sambucus nigra ‘Aurea’). Below, it’s mingling with ‘Lady in Red’ Texas sage (Salvia coccinea). (I usually try to keep the basil flowers pinched off, but sometimes they get away from me, as in this late-August shot.)

'Osmin' basil (Ocimum basilicum) with 'Lady in Red' Texas sage (Salvia coccinea) at Hayefield.com

‘Osmin’ basil (Ocimum basilicum) with ‘Lady in Red’ Texas sage (Salvia coccinea)

Purple basils are also excellent for contrasting with silvers. Below is what Chiltern Seeds sells as ‘Purple Tulsi’ holy basil, paired with gold-and-silver chrysanthemum (Ajania pacifica).

"Purple Tulsi" holy basil (Ocimum) with gold-and-silver chrysanthemum (Ajania pacifica) at Hayefield.com

Chiltern’s ‘Purple Tulsi’ holy basil (Ocimum) with gold-and-silver chrysanthemum (Ajania pacifica)

‘Red Rubin’ is another excellent purple strain: equally as good as ‘Osmin’ and excellent for contrasting with yellow leaves, like those of ‘Australian Yellow’ lettuce, and setting off reds, such as ‘Lady in Red’ Texas sage.

'Red Rubin' basil (Ocimum basilicum) with 'Australian Yellow' lettuce and 'Lady in Red' Texas sage (Salvia coccinea) at Hayefield.com

‘Red Rubin’ basil (Ocimum basilicum) with ‘Australian Yellow’ lettuce and ‘Lady in Red’ Texas sage (Salvia coccinea)

That’s it for the first four handsome herbs; there are lots more combinations to come. Look for Part 2 on February 15th. Thanks for visiting!

13 responses to this post.

  1. Nancy, Wow, Wow, and Wow, your photos are so beautiful and to document and post all must take so much time, thank you for sharing your amazing gardening world and expertise with us. I, being a foliage lover, am particularly fond of the photo with the Canna in the background. Nice way to start my day! Viewing this post! Cathy T

    A very good morning to you, Cathy! Yes, that pineapple sage-and-canna combo made me happy, too: it looked great for months. But honestly, it would be hard to made a bad combination with ‘Golden Delicious’, in the ground or in containers.
    -Nan

  2. Posted by Tiiu Mayer on January 15, 2015 at 8:42 am

    After that breath of spring and summer it’s a real letdown to realize winter is still out there! Thanks Nancy for all the color and greenery and inspiration.

    Hey there, Tiiu! I guess we should just be grateful that we’re not having a repeat of last year’s cold *and* snow. Well, it’ll soon be seed-starting time. May all of your winter garden plans come to fruition this coming season!
    -Nan

  3. Posted by Carolyn Kreider on January 15, 2015 at 9:21 am

    Once again – simply beautiful!! You’ve inspired me to incorporate more of these gems into my beds….spring cannot come soon enough! And if I plant more thyme, there will be less mulching to do – win-win! Thank you for sharing your wonderful creativity with us….blessings to you in the New Year.

    Good to hear from you, Carolyn. You’ll still need mulch the first year, but yes, after that, the creeping thymes can make a really nice carpet once they get going. Have fun with them!
    -Nan

  4. You are indeed a master of great plant combinations! I’m looking forward to your new book. :)

    Thank you! I’m very much looking forward to it being finished (though I am having a great time writing it!).
    -Nan

  5. Posted by Rita Sillivan-Smith on January 15, 2015 at 12:37 pm

    Gorgeous — I soooo adore Herbs– I can smell them your pictures are so awesome! Thankfully, I can step into the sun room for a sniff of rosemary, bay and scented pelargoniums! Thank you !

    I remember how much you love herbs, Rita, and how beautifully you have them incorporated into your garden. Stay warm, and enjoy your indoor herbs for a few more months!
    -Nan

  6. Posted by Patty on January 15, 2015 at 1:28 pm

    Nancy:
    It’s always a joy to receive notice of a new post from you, and today’s photos are as inspiring as ever. Definitely a pick-me-up in the dead of winter – something that gets the creative juices flowing, and makes my fingers itch for spring! You’ve given me several new ideas for incorporating herbs into some of my beds. Many thanks for your usual generous sharing.

    Hi, Patty! I’m so glad you enjoyed the post. I’d intended to do one of my traditional mid-winter nomenclature posts, but at this time of year, some color (that isn’t snow-white or mud-brown) seems much more welcome. The next one will have lots more like these!
    -Nan

  7. Very pretty pictures and post. I love lavender but have never been able to get it to last long because of our heat in the summer. I do keep rosemary and several types of basil, as well as peppermint, which grows wonderfully. I have some seeds for Mexican Feather Grass and plan to try that for the first time this year. I just love the way you’ve clumped the herbs in your garden and everything looks so green and luscious!

    Eh, too cold, too hot, too wet, too dry: it’s always something with these darn plants, isn’t it? The uncertainty makes gardening akin to a benign form of gambling: you pay your money and you take your chances. But isn’t it great when they pay off? I hope the Mexican feather grass does beautifully for you; it’s another one that looks lovely with pretty much any companions.
    -Nan

  8. As usual, your post is full of inspirational photos. I have lots of thyme and lots of succulents in my garden but hadn’t thought of mixing the two. Now I will! Thanks for sharing your plant combinations Nan!

    Hello, Kris! (I was going to say “Happy January” to you, but I think that’s an oxymoron for most of us in this hemisphere.) I imagine that your succulent plantings are much more dense than mine, but it’s always handy to have something that can fill in any empty spaces–for those of us who aren’t fond of the bare-soil look, anyway.
    -Nan

  9. Posted by Barbara Dashwood on January 15, 2015 at 5:51 pm

    Okay. Okay. I get the message, Nan. ‘Berggarteen”!!! ;>) And a beauty it is. Thanks for bringing it to our attention. It looks lovely. I’m a big fan of ‘Icterina’ which does well in our climate. I have some which are 4 years old and love combining with the blues and purples as you have suggested. Happy New Year! Envying you your respite from weeding. They never stop growing here!
    Barbara Dashwood
    Victoria, BC

    Hi Barbara! You’re lucky to be able to overwinter ‘Icterina’; sometimes it makes it through part of the winter here but fizzles out just as I get my hopes up. I’m glad it’s so easy to find. The only hard part is resisting the urge to buy a whole flat; the young plants are sooooo cute.
    -Nan

  10. Posted by John Drexel on January 15, 2015 at 11:30 pm

    Nan,

    Happy New Year! Thank you for continuing your blog. I missed you, your photos and the generous sharing of your experiences and garden. Your images are consistently 5-star quality. That said, your opening image of 2015 was just spectacular – two of my favorite plants. And, the following images were pretty wonderful too. Succulents are particularly attractive to me and I enjoyed seeing your combinations. Due to my move last summer I had to edit the over-wintering of my succulents. I hope my “supermarket purchased greenhouse” continues to keeps them from freezing so we have a promising start this spring.

    Good to hear from you, John, and a belated Happy Birthday from me, Mom, and the boys. It’s good to hear that you enjoyed the post. I hope your succulents continue to thrive. I decided to leave most of mine outside, because I’ve gotten tired of digging them up each fall and planting them out again each spring. Not sure what I’ll get into next, besides the herbs. Have a great day!
    -Nan

  11. Posted by robertclydeanderson on January 17, 2015 at 9:03 am

    Hi Nan,

    Thanks for another terrific post, and inspiring photos as always. I’m glad to see you’re a fan of ‘Berggarten’. It’s a plant I’ve been pushing on my friends and customers for years, and here in the Hudson Valley (zone 5) it’s failed to overwinter only once in the last fifteen years, which is saying something for a sage! It will usually defoliate and look quite dead but resprouts from the stems and grows out mightily once the warm weather returns. It also suckers slowly and can be divided and shared or used as an edger… similar in effect to Stachys byzantina but less unruly. Great plant!

    “similar in effect to Stachys byzantina but less unruly” – you nailed it, Robert! It is an outstanding foliage selection, not just for the herb garden but for any garden. I’ve read that the flavor is quite good too, though I can’t speak to that personally; sage isn’t something I use much, just for the occasional cup of tea for a sore throat.
    -Nan

  12. I’m glad to hear it’s not just me that lavenders and variegated sages die out on. I guess I need to develop your easy-come, easy-go attitude about it.

    You know how it is: some plants are worth growing as annuals if the price is right. Around here, I can find 2-inch pots of most herbs for around 2 dollars, which is less than most “real” annuals.
    -Nan

  13. Beautiful pictures, they really take herbs out of the herb garden!
    I never thought to plant out the non-hardy succulents, I have a bunch which need repotting and now I know what to do with all the extras and cuttings…. I just have to resist the urge to take them in again when frost threatens :)
    Your pictures are worse than a seed catalog, a bunch of new things have just been added to the want list.

    Hey there, Frank. It’s hard to resist making more of the tender succulents, isn’t it? Planting them in the ground is a good way to put those extras to use. Many seem to be able to tolerate a few degrees of frost, but if you can ignore them, they eventually reduce to slime like begonias and impatiens do, and there’s not much left to deal with in spring.
    -Nan

Comments are closed.