Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day – July 2014

'Monte Negro' Asiatic lily (Lilium) with golden meadowsweet (Filipendula ulmaria 'Aurea') [July 1, 2014] at Hayefield.com

‘Monte Negro’ Asiatic lily (Lilium) with golden meadowsweet (Filipendula ulmaria ‘Aurea’) [July 1, 2014]

There’s been lots going on in the garden over the past few weeks, and I have plenty of flower and foliage pictures to share with you. We’re in the midst of a stormy spell right now, though, so in the interest of getting this post done before the power goes out, it’ll just be a gallery of the highlights with captions under each one. (At least, they should be there; I apologize in advance if any of the formatting is a bit wonky.) I hope you enjoy the quick tour!

'Firefly' cuphea (Cuphea) [July 1, 2014] at Hayefield.com

‘Firefly’ cuphea (Cuphea) [July 1, 2014]

'Landini' Asiatic lily [July 10, 2014] at Hayefield.com

‘Landini’ Asiatic lily [July 10, 2014]

'Religious Radish' coleus with Vertigo pennisetum (Pennisetum purpureum 'Tift 8') [July 1, 2014] at Hayefield.com

‘Religious Radish’ coleus with Vertigo pennisetum (Pennisetum purpureum ‘Tift 8′) [July 1, 2014]

Petunia exserta [July 10, 2014] at Hayefield.com

Petunia exserta [July 10, 2014]

'Lemon Spritzer' cape fuchsia (Phygelius x rectus) [July 1, 2014] at Hayefield.com

‘Lemon Spritzer’ cape fuchsia (Phygelius x rectus) [July 1, 2014]

Electric Pink cordyline (Cordyline banksii) with 'Profusion Cherry' zinnia, 'Frau Dagmar' rose (Rosa rugosa), and American ipecac (Porteranthus stipulatus) [June 27, 2014] at Hayefield.com

Electric Pink cordyline (Cordyline banksii) with ‘Profusion Cherry’ zinnia, ‘Frau Dagmar’ rose (Rosa rugosa), and American ipecac (Porteranthus stipulatus) [June 27, 2014]

Shredded umbrella plant (Syneilesis aconitifolia) [July 12, 2014] at Hayefield.com

Shredded umbrella plant (Syneilesis aconitifolia) [July 12, 2014]

White-leaved leather flower (Clematis glaucophylla) [July 10, 2014] at Hayefield.com

White-leaved leather flower (Clematis glaucophylla) [July 10, 2014]

Tangier pea (Lathyrus tingitanus) [June 25, 2014] at Hayefield.com

Tangier pea (Lathyrus tingitanus) [June 25, 2014]

Japanese burnet (Sanguisorba obtusa) [July 10, 2014] at Hayefield.com

Japanese burnet (Sanguisorba obtusa) [July 10, 2014]

Purple coneflower (Echinacea purpurea) with 'Dewey Blue' bitter panic grass (Panicum amarum) and southern bush honeysuckle (Diervilla sessilifolia) [July 10, 2014] at Hayefield.com

Purple coneflower (Echinacea purpurea) with ‘Dewey Blue’ bitter panic grass (Panicum amarum) and southern bush honeysuckle (Diervilla sessilifolia) [July 10, 2014]

Pale coneflower (Echinacea pallida) in the meadow [June 29, 2014] at Hayefield.com

Pale coneflower (Echinacea pallida) in the meadow [June 29, 2014] at Hayefield.com

Purple milkweed (Asclepias purpurascens) in the meadow [July 1, 2014] at Hayefield.com

Purple milkweed (Asclepias purpurascens) in the meadow [July 1, 2014]

Common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) in the meadow [July 1, 2014] at Hayefield.com

Common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) in the meadow [July 1, 2014]

Pink milkweed (Asclepias incarnata) [July 10, 2014] at Hayefield.com

Pink milkweed (Asclepias incarnata) [July 10, 2014]

Butterfly weed (Asclepias tuberosa) in the meadow [July 1, 2014] at Hayefield.com

Butterfly weed (Asclepias tuberosa) in the meadow [July 1, 2014]

'Summer Glow' hummingbird mint (Agastache) [July 1, 2014] at Hayefield.com

‘Summer Glow’ hummingbird mint (Agastache) [July 1, 2014]

'Caribbean Sunset' Mexican heather (Cuphea) [June 27, 2014] at Hayefield.com

‘Caribbean Sunset’ Mexican heather (Cuphea) [June 27, 2014]

Flower Carpet Amber rose with golden meadowsweet (Filipendula ulmaria 'Aurea') [June 24, 2014] at Hayefield.com

Flower Carpet Amber rose with golden meadowsweet (Filipendula ulmaria ‘Aurea’) [June 24, 2014]

Yellow meadow rue (Thalictrum flavum subsp. glaucum) [June 24, 2014] at Hayefield.com

Yellow meadow rue (Thalictrum flavum subsp. glaucum) [June 24, 2014]

Yellow meadow rue (Thalictrum flavum subsp. glaucum) [June 24, 2014] at Hayefield.com

Yellow meadow rue (Thalictrum flavum subsp. glaucum) [June 24, 2014]

'Golden Sweet' snow pea (Pisum sativum) [June 27. 2014] at Hayefield.com

‘Golden Sweet’ snow pea (Pisum sativum) [June 27, 2014]

'Autumn Glow' winter squash (Cucurbita moschata) [July 12, 2014] at Hayefield.com

‘Autumn Glow’ winter squash (Cucurbita moschata) [July 12, 2014]

Corn parsley (Ridolfia segetum) [July 12, 2014] at Hayefield.com

Corn parsley (Ridolfia segetum) [July 12, 2014]

Eastern prickly pear (Opuntia humifusa) [June 27, 2014] at Hayefield.com

Eastern prickly pear (Opuntia humifusa) [June 27, 2014] at Hayefield.com

'Freya' Longiflorum- Asiatic lily (Lilium) [June 25, 2014] at Hayefield.com

‘Freya’ Longiflorum- Asiatic lily (Lilium) [June 25, 2014]

'Sunrise Falls' foamy bells (x Heucherella) [June 26, 2014] at Hayefield.com

‘Sunrise Falls’ foamy bells (x Heucherella) [June 26, 2014]

'Golden Arrow' mountain fleeceflower (Persicaria amplexicaulis) [June 29, 2014] at Hayefield.com

‘Golden Arrow’ mountain fleeceflower (Persicaria amplexicaulis) [June 29, 2014]

Catalina Gilded Grape wishbone flower (Torenia) [June 27, 2014] at Hayefield.com

Catalina Gilded Grape wishbone flower (Torenia) [June 27, 2014]

'Grace' smokebush (Cotinus) [June 26, 2014] at Hayefield.com

‘Grace’ smokebush (Cotinus) [June 26, 2014]

Caribbean copper plant (Euphorbia cotinifolia) [July 7, 2014] at Hayefield.com

Caribbean copper plant (Euphorbia cotinifolia) [July 7, 2014]

'Jams 'n' Jellies Blackberry' rose periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus) [July 10, 2014] at Hayefield.com

‘Jams ‘n’ Jellies Blackberry’ rose periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus) [July 10, 2014]

'Lauren's Grape' poppy (Papaver) [June 25, 2014] at Hayefield.com

‘Lauren’s Grape’ poppy (Papaver) [June 25, 2014] at Hayefield.com

Cow vetch (Vicia cracca) [June 25, 2014] at Hayefield.com

Cow vetch (Vicia cracca) [June 25, 2014]

Pale leather flower (Clematis versicolor0 [July 10, 2014] at Hayefield.com

Pale leather flower (Clematis versicolor) [July 10, 2014]

Heart-leaved speedwell (Veronica grandis) [July 1, 2014] at Hayefield.com

Heart-leaved speedwell (Veronica grandis) [July 1, 2014]

'Blue Cadet' hosta [July 1, 2014] at Hayefield.com

‘Blue Cadet’ hosta [July 1, 2014]

'Axminster Streaked' balloon flower (Platycodon grandiflorus) [July 12, 2014] at Hayefield.com

‘Axminster Streaked’ balloon flower (Platycodon grandiflorus) [July 12, 2014]

'Lanai Twister Purple' verbena [June 26, 2014] at Hayefield.com

‘Lanai Twister Purple’ verbena [June 26, 2014]

Lead plant (Amorpha canescens) [July 3, 2014] at Hayefield.com

Lead plant (Amorpha canescens) [July 3, 2014]

Chinese forget-me-not (Cynoglossum amabile) [July 1, 2014] at Hayefield.com

Chinese forget-me-not (Cynoglossum amabile) [July 1, 2014]

Tweedia (Tweedia caerulea) with Rozanne geranium 9Geranium 'Gerwat') and 'Parfum d'Ethiopia' wormwood (Artemisia) [July 1, 2014] at Hayefield.com

Tweedia (Tweedia caerulea) with Rozanne geranium (Geranium ‘Gerwat’) and ‘Parfum d’Ethiopia’ wormwood (Artemisia) [July 1, 2014]

Grass pea (Lathyrus sativus) [June 25, 2014] at Hayefield.com

Grass pea (Lathyrus sativus) [June 25, 2014]

Variegated dayflower (Commelina communis f. aureostriata) [July 1, 2014] at Hayefield.com

Variegated dayflower (Commelina communis f. aureostriata) [July 1, 2014]

Corsican mint (Mentha requienii) [June 30, 2014] at Hayefield.com

Corsican mint (Mentha requienii) [June 30, 2014]

'Eagle's Beak' tomato [July 1, 2014] at Hayefield.com

‘Eagle’s Beak’ tomato [July 1, 2014]

Papalo or summer cilantro (Porophyllum ruderale) [July 10, 2014] at Hayefield.com

Papalo or summer cilantro (Porophyllum ruderale) [July 10, 2014]

'Jelly Bean' blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum) [July 10, 2014] at Hayefield.com

‘Jelly Bean’ blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum) [July 10, 2014]

Purple royal fern (Osmunda regalis 'Purpurascens') [July 7, 2014] at Hayefield.com

Purple royal fern (Osmunda regalis ‘Purpurascens’) [July 7, 2014]

False goatsbeard (Astilbe biternata) [June 24, 2014] at Hayefield.com

False goatsbeard (Astilbe biternata) [June 24, 2014]

'White Swan' purple coneflower (Echinacea purpurea) [July 3, 2014] at Hayefield.com

‘White Swan’ purple coneflower (Echinacea purpurea) [July 3, 2014]

'Athoun' white sedum (Sedum album) [June 30, 2014] at Hayefield.com

‘Athoun’ white sedum (Sedum album) [June 30, 2014]

White hyacinth bean (Dolichos lablab 'Alba') [July 7, 2014] at Hayefield.com

White hyacinth bean (Dolichos lablab ‘Alba’) [July 7, 2014]

White lace flower (Orlaya grandiflora) [July 10, 2014] at Hayefield.com

White lace flower (Orlaya grandiflora) [July 10, 2014]

Australian tobacco (Nicotiana suaveolens) [July 10, 2014] at Hayefield.com

Australian tobacco (Nicotiana suaveolens) [July 10, 2014]

'Swansdown' poppy (Papaver) [July 10, 2014] at Hayefield.com

‘Swansdown’ poppy (Papaver) [July 10, 2014]

'Field of Dreams' corn (Zea mays) [July 1, 2014] at Hayefield.com

‘Field of Dreams’ corn (Zea mays) [July 1, 2014]

'Bill Archer' borage (Borago officinalis) [July 3, 2014] at Hayefield.com

‘Bill Archer’ borage (Borago officinalis) [July 3, 2014]

'Jade Snowflake' chinaberry (Melia azaderach) [July 9, 2014] at Hayefield.com

‘Jade Snowflake’ chinaberry (Melia azedarach) [July 9, 2014]

Garlic scapes [June 24, 2014] at Hayefield.com

Garlic scapes [June 24, 2014]

'Camouflage' sweet potato vine (Ipomoea batatas) [July 1, 2014] at Hayefield.com

‘Camouflage’ sweet potato vine (Ipomoea batatas) [July 1, 2014]

'Oakhurst' pineapple lily (Eucomis comosa) with 'Tangerine Gem' signet marigold (Tagetes signata) and 'Redbor' kale [July 1, 2014] at Hayefield.com

‘Oakhurst’ pineapple lily (Eucomis comosa) with ‘Tangerine Gem’ signet marigold (Tagetes signata) and ‘Redbor’ kale [July 1, 2014]

'Indigo Rose' tomato [July 9, 2014] at Hayefield.com

‘Indigo Rose’ tomato [July 9, 2014]

Tomato 'OSU Blue' and alfalfa [July 3, 2014] at Hayefield.com

Tomato ‘OSU Blue’ and alfalfa [July 3, 2014]

'Jungle Beauty' daylily (Hemerocallis) [July 3, 2014] at Hayefield.com

‘Jungle Beauty’ daylily (Hemerocallis) [July 3, 2014]

Dyer's woad (Isatis tinctoria) seeds [July 1, 2014] at Hayefield.com

Dyer’s woad (Isatis tinctoria) seeds [July 1, 2014]

Eastern gamagrass (Tripsacum dactyloides) flower spike [July 1, 2014] at Hayefield.com

Eastern gamagrass (Tripsacum dactyloides) flower spike [July 1, 2014]

Japanese emperor oak (Quercus dentata) developing seeds [July 1, 2014] at Hayefield.com

Japanese emperor oak (Quercus dentata) developing seeds [July 1, 2014]

'Freya' lily (Lilium) with heart-leaved speedwell (Veronica grandis), 'Axminster Gold' comfrey (Symphytum x uplandicum), 'Gold Cone' juniper (Juniperus communis), and golden catalpa (Catalpa bignonioides 'Aurea') [June 25, 2014] at Hayefield.com

‘Freya’ lily (Lilium) with heart-leaved speedwell (Veronica grandis), ‘Axminster Gold’ comfrey (Symphytum x uplandicum), ‘Gold Cone’ juniper (Juniperus communis), and golden catalpa (Catalpa bignonioides ‘Aurea’) [June 25, 2014]

White lace flower (Orlaya grandiflora) with 'Patio Deep Blue' gentian sage (Salvia patens) and rose campion (Lychnia coronaria) [July 3, 2014] at Hayefield.com

White lace flower (Orlaya grandiflora) with ‘Patio Deep Blue’ gentian sage (Salvia patens) and rose campion (Lychnia coronaria) [July 3, 2014]

'Oakhurst' pineapple lily (Eucomis comosa), 'Firefly' cuphea, 'Golden Arrow' fleeceflower (Persicaria amplexicaulis), 'Black Truffle' cardinal flower (Lobelia cardinalis), 'Nona's Garnet' daylily (Hemerocallis), 'Jacob Cline' bee balm (Monarda), and 'Red Majestic' contorted hazel (Corylus avellana) [July 3, 2014] at Hayefield.com

‘Oakhurst’ pineapple lily (Eucomis comosa), ‘Firefly’ cuphea, ‘Golden Arrow’ fleeceflower (Persicaria amplexicaulis), ‘Black Truffle’ cardinal flower (Lobelia cardinalis), ‘Nona’s Garnet’ daylily (Hemerocallis), ‘Jacob Cline’ bee balm (Monarda), and ‘Red Majestic’ contorted hazel (Corylus avellana) [July 3, 2014]

'Sun Power' hosta with blue-leaved rose (Rosa glauca) [June 25, 2014] at Hayefield.com

‘Sun Power’ hosta with blue-leaved rose (Rosa glauca) [June 25, 2014]

Star of Persia (Allium christophii) seedheads in the Courtyard Garden [June 24, 2014] at Hayefield.com

Star of Persia (Allium christophii) seedheads in the Courtyard Garden [June 24, 2014]

Wild quinine (Parthenium integrifolium), Invinicbelle Spirit hydrangea (Hydrangea arborescens), giant fleeceflower (Persicaria polymorpha), and silver willow (Salix alba var. sericea) [July 10, 2014] at Hayefield.com

Wild quinine (Parthenium integrifolium), Invinicbelle Spirit hydrangea (Hydrangea arborescens), giant fleeceflower (Persicaria polymorpha), and silver willow (Salix alba var. sericea) [July 10, 2014]

Side Garden with tufted hair grass (Deschampsia cespitosa), 'Rubenza' cosmos (Cosmos bipinnatus) , Invincibelle Spirit hydrangea (Hydrangea arborescens), wild quinine (Parthenium integrifolium), meadowsweet (Filipendula ulmaria), and giant fleeceflower (Persicaria polymorpha) [July 1, 2014] at Hayefield.com

Side Garden with tufted hair grass (Deschampsia cespitosa), ‘Rubenza’ cosmos (Cosmos bipinnatus) , Invincibelle Spirit hydrangea (Hydrangea arborescens), wild quinine (Parthenium integrifolium), meadowsweet (Filipendula ulmaria), and giant fleeceflower (Persicaria polymorpha) [July 1, 2014]

Side Garden with tufted hair grass (Deschampsia cespitosa), 'Rubenza' cosmos (Cosmos bipinnatus) , Invincibelle Spirit hydrangea (Hydrangea arborescens), and giant fleeceflower (Persicaria polymorpha) [July 10, 2014] at Hayefield.com

Side Garden with tufted hair grass (Deschampsia cespitosa), ‘Rubenza’ cosmos (Cosmos bipinnatus) , Invincibelle Spirit hydrangea (Hydrangea arborescens), and giant fleeceflower (Persicaria polymorpha) [July 10, 2014]

Front garden with 'Milk Chocolate' and 'Nona's Garnet' daylilies (Hemerocallis), 'Mellow Yellow' spirea (Spiraea thunbergii 'Ogon'), 'Profusion Orange' zinnia, 'Royal Purple' smokebush (Cotinus coggygria), and 'Red Majestic' contorted hazel (Corylus avellana) [July 12, 2014] at Hayefield.com

Front garden with ‘Milk Chocolate’ and ‘Nona’s Garnet’ daylilies (Hemerocallis), ‘Mellow Yellow’ spirea (Spiraea thunbergii ‘Ogon’), ‘Profusion Orange’ zinnia, ‘Royal Purple’ smokebush (Cotinus coggygria), and ‘Red Majestic’ contorted hazel (Corylus avellana) [July 12, 2014]

Whew – made it! Thanks for stopping by today. For more July garden goodness, be sure to visit Carol’s main Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day post at May Dreams Gardens.

Daylilies: a favorite alpaca snack

Mmmm…daylilies are yummy

31 responses to this post.

  1. Posted by joann scholl on July 15, 2014 at 5:54 am

    the wonderful lushness of summer! thanks for the beauty.do you know a source for rosa glauca?thanks.happy summer!!!

    Good morning, Joann. I started with Rosa glauca from seed years ago and have let if self-sow since then. If you’d like to try that, seeds are available through Trade Winds Fruit. If you’d prefer a plant, here are the first two results that came up on a Google search: High Country Roses and Digging Dog.
    -Nan

  2. Posted by Sue Gilmour on July 15, 2014 at 7:11 am

    Love the colour combos! I have the same problem with deer desimating my daylilies. Yours maybe a little more controlable? I tried that red cosmos this year, mine is a different tone must be they don’t take a true photo. Thanks for the name of Freya! It is one gorgeous lily and mine is blooming now too, my Axminster Streaked Platycodon is just coming into bud and the ones in the shadier area will hopefully bloom this year, a weed tree or two was pruned out this winter.
    Your garden is always inspiring for me, have a great day! TTFN…Sue

    Hah – I wouldn’t say that my little “dears” are all that controllable, Sue, but Daniel and Duncan do have to wait for me to cut the daylilies for them to eat. I have a dozen or so clumps behind the veg garden just for their summer snacks. I wouldn’t even try planting daylilies outside of the fence because of the real deer. I know what you mean about the ‘Rubenza’ cosmos – the flowers change color so quickly from deep ruby red to faded rose that it’s hard to get a definitive photo.
    -Nan

  3. Posted by Nick on July 15, 2014 at 8:09 am

    OOOH, Papaver Swansdown……………………..

    Oh yeah, it’s a beauty, isn’t it? Looks perfect for just a few hours before it starts to brown a bit, and it hates wind and rain, but that short window of perfection is worth it. You can find seed from a number of sources; here’s one I found with a search: Georgia Vines.
    -Nan

  4. Posted by Nick on July 15, 2014 at 8:10 am

    All so beautiful, by the way :).

    Too many tempting plants for a plantaholic.

    Sorry about that, Nick!
    -Nan

  5. Posted by Karen on July 15, 2014 at 8:17 am

    Loved the tour!!! Wish I lived closer so I could be there in person, but this is the next best thing. Great start to my day. Tried to pick a favorite, but couldn’t narrow it down, as they are all great. Thank you!

    Thanks so much for visiting, Karen. I hope you’re having a great summer in your own garden, wherever you are!
    -Nan

  6. Posted by Julie on July 15, 2014 at 9:03 am

    Nan,
    You never fail to inspire…so much so that I’m thinking of venturing out in my 97F/100% humidity weather…
    I’m not familiar with Corn parsley (Ridolfia segetum)–is it edible or entirely ornamental?
    The Parthenium integrifolium you shared with me has taken off and blesses my meadow garden and its inhabitants daily and the purple Atriplex is pushing 8 feet and shows no sign of stopping. Thanks!

    The Ridolfia is a new one for me this year, Julie, acquired from Select Seeds. I think it has some dill flavor and fragrance, but other people say it doesn’t have either. It certainly is a free bloomer and a very pretty cut flower. Thanks for letting me know that the Parthenium and Atriplex seeds did well for you!
    -Nan

  7. One trip through this post and I am gobsmacked!!!! How is it possible one smallish garden can hold so many fabulous plants. I am scurrying off to discover sources for seeds and plants. I also have to tell you that I recently visited Linden Hill Gardens with a friend. And while it will always be a destination for interesting and unusual plants the gardens seemed dull and not particularly special. I initially put it off to the time of summer, transition, etc. but after reading this post I know what is missing is you. I love Linden Hill and Jerry Fritz but the gardens, specially the far garden, are not the same without Nan. Thank you for taking the time to share these amazing photos and your exhaustive documenting of their botanical names. It is appreciated more than you will ever know. Now back to this post for a closer, drooly look. Thanks Nan. (When does the new book come out?) (Also, are you planning on a garden open day any time in the future?)

    Good morning, Heidi! I’m sure you managed to score some cool plants on your trip to Linden Hill, anyway; I did when I was there a month or so ago. Rob and I are still working on the next book, but it should be wrapped up and turned in by the end up next month. It won’t be out until the end of 2015, though. No open gardens any more, I’m afraid; I’m having a hard enough time keeping up with writing and blogging!
    -Nan

  8. A visit to your site always means beautiful photos of a beautiful garden. But what is especially noteworthy is your precise labeling, So nice to get the name of a plant that catches one’s eye. I discovered a couple of things new to me and now I know exactly what to look for. Thanks.

    I appreciate that feedback, Linda. I know how frustrating it is to see a cool plant and not have the name to track it down. I do my best to make sure all the names are correct, but if anyone thinks one or more might be wrong, I’d welcome the correction(s).
    -Nan

  9. As usual its so many lovely plants you have, its nearlu TOO much. I want them all and thats not possible when you are living in this cold climat. :-(
    But…the last month we have had nearly too hot – up to +30C – and no rain at all. Then this weekend we have finally got 20 m´m, perfect!
    So now I can rest from the watering and take swims in our little new pool. It´s better than carrying water around…..
    LOVE
    Susie

    I’m so happy to hear that you’ve received some much-needed rain, Susie. No matter how much watering we do, there’s nothing like a good rain to make the plants happy this time of year. Enjoy your swim!
    -Nan

  10. Posted by Barbara Dashwood on July 15, 2014 at 10:17 am

    Lovely! Lovely! Lovely! It’s wondrous how it all pulls together to produce the summer garden after your long winter. I am particularly struck by the ‘Freya’ lily. What a vigorous looking plant. Sometimes a garden needs a touch of touch of testosterone, or whatever it is that gives a plant that sort of swagger and substance, and I’m thinking my garden is one of them. Thanks as always for your kind sharing. Barbara. Victoria,BC

    ‘Freya’ truly is outstanding, Barbara. The stems are practically tree-like and last (with the handsome seedheads) even through the winter. The vigor has been consistent for several years, too. The color is interesting, as well: a very pretty soft yellow when new and lasting that way if the weather is cool and/or cloudy, turning creamy white in sun. It’s not a color range I normally like much, but I really admire the plant!
    -Nan

  11. Magnifique photo fleurie
    bonne après-midi :)

    Merci, Zingara – and happy Bloom Day to you!
    -Nan

  12. Nan: KUDOS! Your photos, especially the close-ups, seem so artfully composed & well lit, but still journalistic/informational to those of us thrilled to learn about these not-often-seen plants. They’re truly compelling! These photos inspire us to plant more, and more unusual things! And you’re doing a great service to post these with their common & botanical names. Internet searches for any of these curiosities may yield these images to enrich us all….even those who don’t (yet) eagerly await each and every Hayefield.com post! Thank you so much.

    You’re so kind, Eric. I have a great time putting these together. I feel like it was cheating only doing captions…but maybe folks don’t mind that as long as there’s complete ID info. I was just happy to get the post done before the round of storms hit last night. I hope you haven’t had any damage to your place; it’s been a rough season for storms around here.
    -Nan

  13. Posted by Jeffrey K. Funk on July 15, 2014 at 11:39 am

    Ohhhh! So many white flowers – My favorite color! Where did you find a source for the Nicotiana suaveolens? How does this plant behave in the garden? I have Nicotiana alata currently, and although i love the scent, it is a very generous reseeder (not a bad thing entirely) but also kinda… thuggish. The plant forms very large mats with it’s leaves and that smothers anything next to it, making it difficult to intermingle with other delicate plants. This nicotiana looks … daintier. Does it also have a smell?

    I tried to google it looking for a source (and more pictures), but the only sourse that came up was annie’s annuals from Dave’s Garden, but that was a bad link, suggesting she doesn’t carry that nicotiana anymore. Perhaps you will have to offer that plant as part of your seed exchange?

    Hi Jeffrey! I didn’t realize how rare that Nicotiana suaveolens is until I searched for it online yesterday to find the common name. I got it from reader Kim M. (thanks, Kim!), who has shared some really cool seeds with me, including some other nicotianas that haven’t yet come into bloom. I will definitely try to collect seeds. Yesterday’s rain knocked off the flowers, so I couldn’t do a smell test today, but I will try it when new flowers open.
    -Nan

    • Posted by Jeffrey K. Funk on July 17, 2014 at 12:19 pm

      Found it! I remember reading about rare(r) nicotiana’s from Margaret Roach’s blog and, sure enough, they have it (as well as a bunch of other nicotiana’s i should try…)

      http://daggawalla.com/

      The picture on their website does make it look more dainty, too – not like the beast of a plant that N. alata is w/ it’s huge overlapping leaves that will smoother anything next to it…

      That’s strange: I went to the site but don’t see Nicotiana suaveolens in the listings or coming up in a search. Maybe I’m just missing it. The plant definitely *is* dainty; I’m more worried about it getting crowded out than the other way ’round.
      -Nan

  14. What an amazing variety of blossoms you have. Thanks for sharing them with us.

    Thank *you* for taking the tour today, Dorothy. Happy Bloom Day!
    -Nan

  15. Posted by Paula M. on July 15, 2014 at 12:44 pm

    I really like the White Lace flower (orlaya grandiflora). I see that it is an annual. Does it self-seed each year or do you start it inside each year. Beautiful photos, as usual!

    Isn’t that lovely, Paula? I’ve had a hard time getting it going from purchased seed, but reader Katherine G. sent me a generous amount from her garden last winter and they’ve done great. It’s probably one of those seeds that wants to be sown really fresh. I direct sowed them in March and they’ve been in bloom for about 2 weeks now. It looks like there will be lots of seed!
    -Nan

  16. Posted by Verna colliver on July 15, 2014 at 1:01 pm

    The “religious radish” coleus caught my eye. How do all those lovely plants get their colorful (pun intended) names, the pronounceable ones, not the Latin ones? I would guess that the liturgical color is part of the answer but what is it with “radish”?
    Glad the storm held off until you finished your post. A “garden open day”–What a wonderful idea!!

    I’ve never heard the story behind how that coleus received its name, but it certainly has gotten the plant a lot of attention. Plants with silly names make gardening even more fun–as long as they’re not too “precious.” I ended up planting a ‘Fluffy Ruffles’ fern and ‘Itsy Bitsy’ ivy with a piggyback plant in a container this year: the combination was nice, but thinking of the cutesy names made me cringe a bit.
    -Nan

    • Yes. My daylily, Hemerocallis “You Are My Sunshine” is thriving & I’d like to share some next year, but I think folks might shy away from that gag-worthy name.

      Oh, that’s not too bad, really; I doubt that would stop anyone from enjoying it. There are many worse names on pretty plants.
      -Nan

  17. Posted by Allan Robinson on July 15, 2014 at 1:04 pm

    Hi Nan, thanks for the colourful tour round your beautiful garden, as always a visual delight. Your plants always seem to be in the best of health and not affected by pests. Do you ever have problems with slugs, snails and other nasty beasties? Many gardens in the UK have been decimated this year due to the mild wet winter and population explosion of said beasties, my own garden included. Unfortunately they saw off most of my seedlings as well. it isn’t all bad though I have saved several plants including 3 Papaver Lauren’s grape, 1 phytolacca Silberstein and 1 Patrinia Scabiosifolia and the spaces left by the decimated plants offer space for new plants.

    Oh, certainly, Allan: I have pests–you just don’t get to see the damaged ones. The slugs and snails were really bad this spring but practically disappeared about a month ago. We’ve also been blessedly spared by the cabbageworms (just one small wave came through a few weeks ago) and the cucumber beetles. The Japanese beetles are now coming back with a vengeance, though, after being practically non-existent for the past 5 years or so. I’m glad that you were able to salvage a few of your seedlings, anyway!
    -Nan

    • Posted by Allan Robinson on July 16, 2014 at 8:54 am

      I meant to add thank you as the seeds were kindly sent from your good self Nan. I have just ordered some nematodes to kill vine weevil and slugs before my garden gets completely eaten away. Hopefully there will be frogs in my new pond next year and they should keep the slug population down.

      That’s great to hear, Allan. I hope the slugs give you a break very soon.
      -Nan

  18. Posted by Patty on July 15, 2014 at 1:18 pm

    What your photos and writing do for the soul! The most incredible thing; by spreading joy, beauty, serenity, peace, harmony, inspiration, and sheer happy! The great education is such a bonus. Thank You.

    How sweet of you, Patty! I really appreciate you taking the time to visit today. I wish you the same joy from your own garden. Happy Bloom Day!
    -Nan

  19. You managed to get a LOT in under the threat of a power outage! As usual, your photos are mouth-watering. On this occasion, they’ve convinced me that I really need to try some milkweeds. I was also impressed by the depth of the purple foliage shown by your Eucomis ‘Oakhurst.’ In comparison mine appear as a bleached out burgundy. Any theory as to why this might be? My speculation is it could be insufficient water (we’re under a serious drought and I’ve cut back throughout my garden).

    Interesting that you should mention that, Kris. It *is* unusual for the foliage of ‘Oakhurst’ to still be so dark at this point in the growing season. My theory is that it’s because we’ve had so much cloudy weather this summer. I’m very aware of that from watching the daily energy production (or lack thereof) of my solar panels. We’ve had sun, but very few full days of intense sun in the last two months. Most of the “sunny” days have only been about 75% of the intensity that I know is possible. I’m guessing that’s why my ‘Red Majestic’ contorted hazel is also still quite purple, instead of purplish green, which it usually is by now. I imagine you’re getting a lot more sun than we are!
    -Nan

  20. Posted by p m on July 15, 2014 at 8:31 pm

    Extraordinary!!!

    Thanks, Paula!
    -Nan

  21. Always look forward to your posts. I delight in your plant combinations and have copied a few of them. Thank you for sharing.

    That’s great to hear, Shell. It’s great to have you as a reader!
    -Nan

  22. Your flowers are all so lovely, I like the Clematises with the bell shapes. The variegated leaves are also a favorite of mine, I hadn’t seen squash variegated before. Your Petunia exserta looks great, my seeds from your giveaway have produced some plants that now have one bloom on them so far, hopefully they will get bushy like yours soon. A rabbit bit one flower off and moles are making mounds in the bed with the Petunias! I like getting to see your vegetables too, I think vegetables are pretty too, and so tasty when home-grown.

    Isn’t that ‘Autumn Glow’ squash striking? It takes a bit of getting used to – admittedly, the yellow-speckled leaves could appear to be diseased at first glance – but it’s a beautiful color accent and very productive as well. I hope the critters leave your petunias alone soon. I’ve found that the plants I put in a pot (the ones I photographed) have grown much more speedily and bloomed more abundantly than those in the ground.
    -Nan

  23. You have such an amazing garden and the photos are just stunning. You have such a wonderful ability to frame your elements and pull them into a story, the beginning of a story.

    Hi there, Charlie! It’s very kind of you to say that. I’m happy to hear that you enjoyed the photos. It felt a bit like cheating, doing just photos and captions to speed the process of finishing the post, but knowing they stand on their own makes me think that wasn’t such a bad thing. I hope you’re having a great summer in your part of the world!
    -Nan

  24. I can’t say anything about the photos, I was here a few days ago and glanced over them and now came back for a second look. I don’t know if you’ve just been taking photography tips on each of the last few books or what, but they are amazing! Peas have never looked more romantic :)
    I love your etsy shop and am looking forward to picking a few things out this winter, the browallia Americana from last year is really doing great for me, thanks!
    Now if only I could get the eucomis to take off, it’s one from your Oakhurst seed and it’s just not thrilled with my care yet. Oh and the glass corn looks very promising too!

    Hey, Frank! The photos have stayed pretty much the same, but I think I’ve finally figured out how to get clearer versions of them posted. (I’ve been using WordPress for 7 years now, so it’s about time.) I’m glad you like the Etsy shop. I’m adding new seeds every week or two, as things are ripening, so keep checking. It’s super that you got one Eucomis seedling, at least; I find them to take a number of years to reach flowering size, so don’t take it personally!
    -Nan

  25. Never fails to inspire. I have a list of plants to research and hunt down. The Monte Negro Asiatic lily (we have a friend in the country of Montenegro), Pale leather Clematis, Purple/Common Milkweed, Yellow Meadow Rue (gorgeous fluff), Lauren’s grape poppy, Lead plants, Swansdown Poppy, Jade snowflake Chinaberry and the Star of Persia Alium……..I have some work to do. Always love your post

    Thanks, Shelley! Some of those aren’t in the trade, so you may have trouble tracking down sources. Feel free to get in touch if there’s something you can’t find; I’ll point you in the right direction if I can.
    -Nan

  26. Fantastic pictures, beautiful plants(some of them unknown to me) and goreous lillies.
    Thanks a lot.
    Jorge

    Good to hear from you, Jorge. I hope your winter is going well!
    -Nan

  27. Hi Nan, are you seeing any Monarch caterpillars or butterflies on your milkweeds yet? I’m not, and I haven’t seen hardly any butterflies or pollinators this year except the dependable bumblebees. Oh, and my neighbor has honeybees so I see them. They are a delight, but the numbers seem down everywhere.

    So many beautiful plants, and you always have something I’ve never seen before. I want them all. Haha.~~Dee

    Hey there, Dee. Now that you mention it, I haven’t seen many butterflies of any kind in the last few weeks. It’s been unusually cool here, so I thought that had something to do with it–either that or because there have been a whole lot more birds in the garden, for some reason. I’ll have to wander out to the meadow to get a closer look for larvae on the milkweeds.
    -Nan

  28. I envy your gorgeous garden and the photos are fantastic. We have limited outdoor space now and I think a container garden will be the answer for next year.

    Thanks for visiting, Jill. Containers are a lot of fun, even if you *do* have ample outdoor planting space. Though they need more watering, there’s a lot less weeding involved–a big plus. And if you use perennials and shrubs in your container combinations, you’ve got a good start on fillers for future in-ground gardens. Have a good time playing with your pots and planters!
    -Nan

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