From My Garden to Yours – 2013

Seeds at Hayefield.com

Deadline for requests: 11:59 pm EST on November 25, 2013

Edit 11/24/13: Due to an overwhelming number of requests, the following seeds are no longer available: Asclepias speciosa, Euphorbia marginata, Lindera benzoin, Nicotiana (collected from “Pink Mutabilis”), Nigella damascena ‘Cramers’ Plum’, Papaver ‘Lauren’s Grape’, Pavonia missionum, Phlomis tuberosa, Ptelea trifoliata ‘Aurea’, Sanguisorba tenuifolia ‘Purpurea’,  Stachys officinalis ‘Alba’, and Trachelium caeruleum ‘Black Knight’

Well, my friends, I’m delighted to once again have the opportunity to thank you for being loyal readers by sharing some of the bounty of my garden with you. I’ve been gathering, cleaning, and packing up seeds for months now, and I have over a hundred cool things for you to choose from this year. There are ornamentals and edibles; annuals, perennials, woody plants, vines, grasses, and vegetables; garden plants and meadow denizens; and exotics and U.S. natives – so, something for everyone, I think!

I have more to say about how this all works, but if I were in your place, I’d want to see the list first and read all the blah, blah, blah later. So for now, have fun going through the offerings and making your wish list. (By the way, you can click on each image to see the full-sized version of the picture.) As you will see, each offering includes a brief description. This is just the basics, though, so I encourage you to use your favorite search engine to get more in-depth information about the plants you’re interested in and how best to grow them in your particular area and growing conditions.

At this point, I can’t promise how many packets I’ll be able to send each of you, so I encourage you to ask for several things (up to around 10); that way, I’ll have options if I run out of some of your top choices. As you make your list, you may want to put a star next to the ones you want most, because I’ll ask you to list your requests in order of preference (those you want the most first). I think that’s all you need to know for the moment; now, enjoy!

ANNUALS

Unless otherwise noted, these annuals flower from early or midsummer into fall.

DSCF3599 Browallia americana
(amethyst flower)
small but abundant purple-blue flowers; about 18 inches tall; full sun to partial shade; self-sows
040 Bupleurum rotundifolium
(hare’s ear)
euphorbia-like yellow flowers from early to midsummer; blue-green leaves; 24 to 30 inches tall; full sun to light shade; may self-sow freely
DSCF6729 Celosia ‘Cramers’ Amazon’
(‘Cramers’ Amazon’ celosia)
magenta-pink spikes; purple-marked green leaves; 6 to 8 feet tall; full sun
132 Celosia ‘Mega Punk’
(‘Mega Punk’ celosia)
reddish pink flower spikes; red leaves and stems; about 3
feet tall; full sun
DSCF4902 Celosia spicata ‘Flamingo Feather’
(‘Flamingo Feather’ celosia)
soft pink flower spikes; to about 3 feet tall; full sun
051 Ceratotheca triloba
(South African foxglove)
pink bells; 3 to 5 feet tall; full sun to light shade
DSCF5879 Commelina communis f. aureostriata
(variegated dayflower)
blue flowers; white-striped leaves; about 1 foot tall but spreads wider; partial to full shade; self-sows freely and may produce all-green seedlings; from reader Kim M.
DSCF7903 Cosmos sulphureus
(sulphur cosmos)
bright orange flowers; 3 to 6 feet tall; full sun
DSCF3310 Emilia javanica ‘Irish Poet’
(‘Irish Poet’ tassel flower)
small, bright orange flowers; 18 to 24 inches tall; full sun
069 Euphorbia marginata
(snow-on-the-mountain)
insignificant greenish yellow flowers; grown for its white-edged, light green leaves and bracts; U.S. native; 1 to 3 feet tall; full sun
DSCF6674 Hibiscus trionum
(New Zealand hibiscus)
pale yellow flowers with dark centers; green leaves; 18 to 24 inches tall; may self-sow freely; from reader Kerry S.
DSCF6323 Impatiens balfouri
(poor man’s orchid)
pink-and-white flowers; 2 to 3 feet tall; partial to full shade; tends to self-sow prolifically
DSCF5971 Ipomoea nil ‘Cornell’
(
‘Cornell’ morning glory)
bright pink, single flowers with white rim; twining vine to 8 feet or more; full sun; from reader Rick R.
015 Mirabilis jalapa ‘Limelight’
(‘Limelight’ four-o’clock)
bright pink flowers; yellow foliage; 1 to 2 feet tall; full sun to light shade
097 Nigella damascena ‘Cramers’ Plum’
(‘Cramers’ Plum’ love-in-a-mist)
white flowers in summer followed by reddish purple pods; 12 to 18 inches tall; full sun to light shade; may self-sow
DSCF4381 Papaver ‘Lauren’s Grape’
(‘Lauren’s Grape’ poppy)
single purple flowers in early summer; about 3 feet tall; full sun; may self-sow
022 Persicaria orientalis ‘Shiro-gane Nishiki’
(variegated kiss-me-over-the-garden-gate)
chains of pink flowers; large leaves splashed with creamy white; about 6 feet tall; full sun to light shade
DSCF6135 Petunia exserta single red flowers; weaving or bushy habit; 2 to 3 feet tall; from reader Rick R.
001 (2) Polanisia dodecandra
(dwarf cleome, red clammyweed)
white flowers with long, reddish stamens; about 2 feet tall; full sun; tends to self-sow
DSCF5464 Tagetes patula ‘Hayefield Strain’
(‘Hayefield Strain’ marigold)
may have solid yellow, orange, maroon, or maroon- and yellow-striped, single flowers; about 3 feet tall; full sun
DSCF5446 Tagetes patula [collected from ‘Villandry’ type]
(marigold)
collected from isolated plant with single, orange-red flowers; not sure if the offspring will be the same; about 3 feet tall; full sun
DSCF5392 Tagetes patula ‘Moldova’
(‘Moldova’ marigold)
red, orange, and yellow, single flowers; 12 to 18 inches tall; full sun; from reader Paula M.
064 Talinum paniculatum ‘Kingwood Gold’
(‘Kingwood Gold’ jewels-of-Opar)
tiny pink flowers; coppery red seedpods; yellow foliage; 1 to 2 feet tall; full sun to partial shade; tends to self-sow
DSCF6222 Thunbergia alata ‘Susie Clear Orange’
(‘Susie Clear Orange’ black-eyed Susan vine
flat-faced orange flowers on twining stems; climbs or trails to 4 to 6 feet; full sun
DSCF5383 Zinnia haageana ‘Soleado’
(‘Soleado’ Mexican zinnia)
golden yellow, single, daisy-form flowers with a touch of red at the center; 18 to 24 inches tall; full sun
015 (2) Zinnia tenuifolia ‘Red Spider’
(‘Red Spider’ zinnia)
bright red, single, daisy-form flowers; 18 to 24 inches tall; full sun

PERENNIALS

DSCF4282 Allium cernuum
(nodding onion)
nodding heads of pink flowers in midsummer (collected from very pale pink clump); 12 to 18 inches tall; U.S. native; full sun to light shade; Zones 4 to 8

DSCF2594

Amsonia hubrichtii
(Arkansas bluestar)
clusters of small, pale blue flowers in late spring, yellow/orange fall color; 3 to 4 feet tall; U.S. native; full sun to partial shade; Zones 4 to 9
DSCF2474 Aquilegia ‘Heart of Gold’
(‘Heart of Gold’ columbine)
single flowers in shades of purple, blue, pink, and white in late spring; bright yellow foliage; 12 to 18 inches tall; Zones 3 to 9 (guessing); strain named by Barbara P. of Mr. McGregor’s Daughter
DSCF3212 Asclepias speciosa
(showy milkweed)
clusters of starry, pale pink flowers in early to midsummer; broad, gray-green leaves; 18 to 36 inches tall; spreads freely by rhizomes; U.S. native; full sun; Zones 3 to 9
DSCF2437 Asphodeline lutea
(king’s spear)
starry yellow flowers on 3- to 4-foot-tall stems in late spring to early summer; clumps of grassy, blue-green leaves to about 1 foot tall; full sun to light shade; Zones 6 to 9
033 Digitalis ferruginea
(rusty foxglove)
slender spikes of small, pale yellowish orange flowers in early to midsummer; 3 to 4 feet tall; full sun to partial shade; Zones 4 to 9
DSCF2753 Digitalis grandiflora
(yellow foxglove)
soft yellow bells in late spring to early summer; 2 to 3 feet tall; partial shade; Zones 3 to 8
DSCF5570 Erigeron karvinskianus
(Mexican fleabane)
tiny but abundant, white daisies that age to pink bloom from early summer well into fall; 6 to 12 inches tall; full sun to light shade; may self-sow; annual here (hardy in Zones 7 to 10)
DSCF3726 Eryngium giganteum
(Miss Willmott’s ghost)
silvery gray flowers in summer; 3 to 4 feet tall; full sun; dies after flowering but will self-sow; Zones 5 to 9
040 (2) Eryngium yuccifolium
(rattlesnake master)
ball-shaped clusters of white flowers in mid- to late summer; spiky grayish green leaves; 4 to 5 feet tall; U.S. native; full sun; Zones 3 to 8
244 Eupatorium hyssopifolium
(hyssop-leaved thoroughwort)
airy heads of white flowers from late summer into fall; very slender leaves; 2 to 3 feet tall; U.S. native; full sun; Zones 4 to 8; spreads by rhizomes
DSCF7628 Helenium puberulum
(rosilla)
small bronzy brown globes above a tiny ruff of yellow petals from midsummer into fall; 2 to 3 feet tall; U.S. native; full sun; Zones 6 to 9
147 Hibiscus laevis
(halberd-leaved hibiscus)
soft pink, single flowers in late summer; yellow fall color; 4 to 6 feet tall; U.S. native; full sun; likes moist soil; Zones 4 to 9
DSCF8032 Lespedeza capitata
(round-headed bush clover)
rounded clusters of small, creamy white flowers in mid- to late summer; seedheads last through winter; 3 to 5 feet tall; U.S. native; full sun to light shade; Zones 4 to 8
DSCF3202 Parthenium integrifolium
(wild quinine)
white flowers from early or midsummer to late summer or early fall; 3 to 4 feet tall; U.S. native; full sun; Zones 4 to 8
DSCF5785 Patrinia scabiosifolia
(golden lace)
open umbels of small, bright yellow flowers in late summer to early fall; leaves turn shades of orange and red in fall; 4 to 6 feet tall; full sun to partial shade; Zones 4 to 9
112 Penstemon digitalis
(foxglove penstemon)
spikes of white flowers in early summer; red to maroon fall foliage color; 2 to 4 feet tall; U.S. native (provenance Milford Township, Bucks County, PA); full sun to light shade; Zones 3 to 8
DSCF2794 Phlomis tuberosa
(tuberous Jerusalem sage)
tiered whorls of pink flowers in early summer; dry into long-lasting seedheads; 4 to 5 feet tall; full sun to light shade; Zones 4 or 5 to 10
DSCF5046 Platycodon grandiflorus ‘Axminster Streaked’
(‘Axminster Streaked’ balloon flower)
puffed-up buds open to purple-blue flowers speckled and streaked with variable amounts of white in mid- to late summer (some seedlings may be solid-colored); yellow-to-red fall color; 12 to 18 inches tall; full sun to partial shade; Zones 3 or 4 to 8
189 Porteranthus stipulatus
(American ipecac, Indian physic)
abundant, small, white flowers in early summer; lacy green leaves turn deep red in fall; U.S. native; 2 to 3 feet tall; full sun to partial shade; Zones 4 to 8
DSCF3787 Pycnanthemum tenuifolium
(narrow-leaved mountain mint)
clusters of tiny, white flowers through much of the summer; needle-like green leaves are intensely mint-scented; 2 to 3 feet tall; seems to be a less vigorous spreader than many mountain mints; U.S. native (provenance Milford Township, Bucks County, PA); full sun to partial shade; Zones 4 to 8
022 (2) Rudbeckia maxima
(giant coneflower)
large, yellow, daisy-form flowers with elongated, dark centers in midsummer atop 5- to 6-foot-tall stems; basal clump of broad, gray-blue leaves; U.S. native; full sun; likes moist soil but adaptable; Zones 4 to 9
DSCF3013 Ruta graveolens ‘Variegata’
(variegated rue)
greenish yellow flowers mostly in early summer; blue-green leaves with irregular cream splashes; markings are most noticeable in cool weather, disappearing in summer heat; 1 to 2 feet tall; full sun; Zones 4 to 10
150 Sanguisorba tenuifolia ‘Alba’
(white Japanese burnet)
nodding clusters of tiny white flowers in late summer atop 5- to 7-foot-tall stems; ferny green leaves turn yellow in fall; full sun to light shade; Zones 4 to 8
DSCF7442 Sanguisorba tenuifolia ‘Purpurea’
(purple Japanese burnet)
arching, reddish purple flower heads atop 5- to 7-foot-tall stems; ferny green leaves turn yellow in fall; full sun to light shade; Zones 4 to 8
137 Stachys officinalis ‘Alba’
(white betony)
white flowers to about 1 foot tall in early summer; tidy clumps of deep green leaves to about 6 inches tall; full sun to partial shade; Zones 4 to 9
DSCF8660 Symphyotrichum laeve
(smooth aster)
light purple-blue daisy-form flowers from late summer into fall; 3 to 5 feet tall; U.S. native; full sun to light shade; Zones 4 to 8
DSCF3388 Verbascum ‘Governor George Aiken’
(‘Governor George Aiken’ mullein)
spikes of white flowers to 6 feet tall in early to midsummer; fuzzy, silvery leaves; full sun; Zones 4 to 9 (guessing); usually biennial; from reader Alice B.
DSCF6243 Vernonia lettermannii
(narrow-leaved ironweed)
clustered, bright purple flowers in early fall; slender green leaves; 24 to 30 inches tall; U.S. native; full sun; Zones 4 to 9
DSCF4255 Veronicastrum virginicum
(Culver’s root)
slender, spiky clusters of white flowers in midsummer; long-lasting seedheads; 5 to 7 feet tall; U.S. native; full sun to light shade; prefers moist soil; Zones 3 to 8

GRASSES

A note about growing grasses from seed: be aware that if you can grow a grass from seed, it can grow itself from seed. In other words, any of these have the potential to self-sow. Well, ok, the corns usually don’t, but the others can—sometimes to the point of being a problem, depending on where you live and where in your garden you’re growing them—so I suggest that you to do some research on those you think you want to try. I don’t want to discourage you from growing them; obviously, I grow them all myself and like them enough to think of sharing them!

Andropogon gerardii at Hayefield.com Andropogon gerardii
(big bluestem)
warm-season meadow grass with slender, reddish panicles in late summer; coppery red fall color; dried foliage persists through winter; clump-forming; 5 to 7 feet tall; U.S. native (provenance Milford Township, Bucks County, PA); full sun; Zones 4 to 9
Andropogon virginicus at Hayefield.com Andropogon virginicus
(broomsedge)
warm-season meadow grass with tufts of silvery seeds in fall; coppery orange fall color; dried foliage persists through winter; clump-forming; 3 to 5 feet tall; U.S. native (provenance Milford Township, Bucks County, PA); full sun; Zones 3 to 8
Calamagrostis brachytricha at Hayefield.com Calamagrostis brachytricha
(Korean feather reed grass)
warm-season grass with pinkish tan flowerheads in fall; yellowish fall color; clump-forming; 3 to 4 feet tall; full sun to partial shade; Zones 4 to 9
Coix lacryma-jobi at Hayefield.com Coix lacryma-jobi
(job’s tears)
dangling green flowers followed by large, bead-like seeds; strappy green leaves; 3 to 4 feet tall; full sun; tends to self-sow; annual
Elymus hystrix Hayefield.com Elymus hystrix
(bottlebrush grass)
cool-season grass with brushy, silvery green, summer flower spikes that turn tan in fall; clump-forming; 3 to 5 feet tall; U.S. native (provenance Milford Township, Bucks County, PA); full sun to partial shade; Zones 3 or 4 to 8
Schizachyrium scoparium at Hayefield.com Schizachyrium scoparium
(little bluestem)
warm-season meadow grass (also great in borders) with silvery seed tufts in fall; coppery fall color; dried foliage persists through winter; clump-forming; 3 to 4 feet tall; U.S. native (provenance Milford Township, Bucks County, PA); full sun; Zones 3 to 9
Sorghastrum nutans at Hayefield.com Sorghastrum nutans
(Indian grass)
warm-season meadow grass (also fine in borders) with spiky, golden tan panicles in late summer; coppery seedheads in fall; orange-yellow fall color; dried foliage persists through winter; clump-forming; 4 to 6 feet tall; U.S. native (provenance Milford Township, Bucks County, PA); full sun; Zones 4 to 9
Spodiopogon sibiricus at Hayefield.com Spodiopogon sibiricus
(frost grass)
warm-season grass with airy panicles in late summer; leaves held horizontally; orange-yellow fall color; 5 to 6 feet tall; clump-forming; prefers moist soil; full sun to light shade; Zones 4 or 5 to 8
Sporobolus heterolepis at Hayefield.com Sporobolus heterolepis
(prairie dropseed)
warm-season grass with airy panicles of cilantro-scented flowers in mid- to late summer; very narrow, arching foliage; golden orange fall color; dried foliage persists through winter; 2 to 4 feet tall in flower; 12 to 18 inches tall in leaf; clump-forming; U.S. native; full sun to light shade; Zones 3 to 8
Stipa tenuissima at Hayefield.com Stipa tenuissima
(Mexican feather grass)
cool-season grass with feathery green panicles in early summer that turn to golden brown seedheads; needle-thin, arching leaves; foliage turns pale tan in late fall and lasts through winter; 1 to 2 feet tall; clump-forming; full sun; Zones 6 to 10 (annual anywhere)
Tridens flavus at Hayefield.com Tridens flavus
(purpletop tridens)
warm-season meadow grass with airy, reddish brown to deep purple panicles in mid- to late summer; yellow fall color; some winter presence; 4 to 6 feet tall; clump-forming; U.S. native (provenance Milford Township, Bucks County, PA); full sun to light shade; Zones 5 to 10
Tripsacum dactyloides at Hayefield.com Tripsacum dactyloides
(eastern gama grass)
warm-season meadow grass with broad leaf blades; slender, arching flower spikes mostly in mid- to late summer, maturing to large, cylindrical seeds; 5 to 8 feet tall; clumps are upright at first, eventually developing a sprawling habit as seeds develop; U.S. native; 6 to 7 feet tall; prefers moist soil; full sun; Zones 4 to 9
Zea mays ‘Old Gold’ at Hayefield.com Zea mays ‘Old Gold’
(‘Old Gold’ corn)
cobs of bright yellow kernels; strappy green leaves striped with yellow; 6 to 7 feet tall; full sun; annual; from reader Rick R.
Zea mays ‘Tiger Cub’ (corn) at Hayefield.com Zea mays ‘Tiger Cub’
(‘Tiger Cub’ corn)
cobs of yellow kernels; strappy green leaves heavily striped with white; to about 3 feet tall; full sun; annual

EDIBLES

Amaranthus ‘Hopi Red Dye’ at Hayefield.com Amaranth ‘Hopi Red Dye’
(Amaranthus ‘Hopi Red Dye’)
leaves, stems, and flower plumes are all deep red; young leaves are edible; mature plant is also very ornamental; can reach 6 to 7 feet tall; full sun; annual
Chrysanthemum coronarium at Hayefield.com Garland chrysanthemum
(Chrysanthemum coronarium)
ferny young leaves and bright yellow flowers are edible; full sun; annual; plants were grown from seed collected in China by botanical explorer Joseph Simcox
Phaseolus lunatus ‘Alma’s PA Dutch Purple Burgundy’ (lima bean) at Hayefield.com Lima bean ‘Alma’s PA Dutch Purple Burgundy’
(Phaseolus lunatus ‘Alma’s PA Dutch Purple Burgundy’)
green pods produce deep reddish purple seeds; vining; full sun; annual
Brassica juncea ‘Ruby Streaks’ (mustard) at Hayefield.com Mustard ‘Ruby Streaks’
(Brassica juncea ‘Ruby Streaks’)
deeply cut, deep purple leaves; best in cool weather; full sun to light shade; annual
Abelmoschus esculentus ‘Bowling Red’ (okra) at Hayefield.com Okra ‘Bowling Red’
(Abelmoschus esculentus ‘Bowling Red’)
hibiscus-like, pale yellow flowers; long, slender, deep red pods; full sun; annual; from Dee N. of Red Dirt Ramblings
Abelmoschus esculentus ‘Hill Country Red’ (okra) at Hayefield.com Okra ‘Hill Country Red’
(Abelmoschus esculentus ‘Hill Country Red’)
hibiscus-like, pale yellow flowers; chunky, reddish pods; full sun; annual; from Dee N. of Red Dirt Ramblings
Vigna unguiculata ‘Pretzel Bean’ at Hayefield.com Pretzel bean
(Vigna unguiculata ‘Pretzel Bean’)
cream-to-pale-purple flowers; curled, green pods that are tough but edible; probably best eaten as seeds (a.k.a. cowpea or black-eyed pea); also ornamental; vining; annual; full sun
Vigna unguiculata ‘Red Noodle’ (red noodle bean) at Hayefield.com Red noodle bean
(Vigna unguiculata ‘Red Noodle’)
cream-to-pale-purple flowers; long, maroon pods are edible but even better as an ornamental; vining; annual; full sun
Lactuca sativa var. asparagina (celtuce) at Hayefield.com Stem lettuce [celtuce]
(Lactuca sativa var. asparagina)
long, slender green leaves; thickened stems are also edible when peeled; annual; full sun to light shade; plants were grown from seed collected in central China by botanical explorer Joseph Simcox

ODDS AND ENDS

Last, a bunch of things that ended up in the miscellaneous category for a variety of reasons: they may be very limited in quantity (as in 5 packets or less), be very slow to germinate, produce unpredictable offspring, have questionable IDs, or just be plain weird.


Abelmoschus moschatus ‘Mischief’ at Hayefield.com
Abelmoschus moschatus ‘Mischief’
(‘Mischief’ musk mallow)
hibiscus-like red flowers; 2 to 3 feet tall; full sun; annual; may be hardy in Zone 8 and south
Ageratina 'Jocius' Variegate' at Hayefield.com Ageratina [collected from ‘Jocius’ Variegate’]
(lesser snakeroot)
bushy, upright perennial topped with fuzzy heads of white flowers in fall; collected from ‘Jocius’ Variegate’, with cream-streaked leaves in spring and summer; its seedlings usually also have cream markings; U.S. native; 4 to 6 feet tall; full sun to partial shade; Zones 4 to 9
Clematis sp. [possibly C. versicolor] at Hayefield.com Clematis sp. [possibly C. versicolor]
(leather flower clematis)
“leather flower”-type clematis with purple-and-white bells from late spring into midsummer; blooms on new growth; to about 5 feet tall; full sun to partial shade; Zones 5 to 10?
Clematis viorna at Hayefield.com Clematis viorna
(leather flower)
thick-petaled, bell-shaped, purplish pink-and-yellow flowers through summer; climbs with tendrils to about 12 feet tall; U.S, native; full sun to partial shade; Zones 4 to 9
Datisca cannabina at Hayefield.com Datisca cannabina
(false hemp)
small, greenish flowers (male and female on separate plants) in midsummer; pinnate leaves; to about 8 feet tall; full sun to light shade; Zones 4 to 8
Diervilla sessilifolia at Hayefield.com Diervilla sessilifolia
(southern bush honeysuckle)
deciduous shrub with small yellow flower from early or midsummer into late summer; reddish seed capsules; showy fall color; 3 to 5 feet tall; U.S. native; full sun to partial shade; Zones 5 to 8; spreads by suckers to form broad clumps
Eucomis comosa 'Oakhurst' at Hayefield.com Eucomis comosa [collected from ‘Oakhurst’]
(pineapple lily)
small, cream-to-pink flowers in an elongated cluster in mid- to late summer; seedlings may have green or purple leaves; takes several years to reach flowering size from seed; full sun to light shade; Zones 7 to 10
Filipendula ulmaria 'Aurea' at Hayefield.com Filipendula ulmaria [collected from ‘Aurea’]
(meadowsweet)
creamy white, fragrant flowers in early to midsummer; collected from plants with bright yellow leaves, but I don’t know if the seedlings will also be yellow; parent plant is about 18 inches tall in bloom; partial shade; likes moisture; Zones 3 to 8
Gossypium herbaceum ‘Nigra’ at Hayefield.com Gossypium herbaceum ‘Nigra’
(black-leaved cotton)
hibiscus-like pink flowers; near-black foliage; about 2 feet tall; full sun; needs lots of heat and a long growing season to produce seed; annual
Haloragis erecta ‘Wellington Bronze’ at Hayefield.com Haloragis erecta ‘Wellington Bronze’
(‘Wellington Bronze’ toatoa)
bushy clumps of small, brown to bronzy green leaves; insignificant flowers; about 1 foot tall here but can reach 2 to 3 feet; darkest color in full sun to light shade; may self-sow; annual here (hardy in Zones 7 to 10)
Lindera benzoin Hayefield.com Lindera benzoin
(spicebush)
deciduous understory shrub with yellow flowers in early spring; yellow fall color; bright red berries in autumn on female plants if a male is nearby; host of spicebush swallowtail and eastern tiger butterfly larvae; 6 to 12 feet tall; U.S. native (provenance Milford Township, Bucks County, PA); full sun to full shade; Zones 4 to 9; seed has been cleaned and stored at 40°F
Liriodendron tulipifera seeds at Hayefield.com Liriodendron tulipifera (tulip poplar) deciduous shade tree with yellow-and-orange flowers in late spring; golden yellow fall color; interesting seedpods; host for eastern tiger swallowtail butterfly larvae; fast-growing, eventually 60 to 90+ feet tall; U.S. native (provenance Milford Township, Bucks County, PA); prefers moist soil; full sun to partial shade; Zones 4 to 9; fairly low viability but may be worth a try
Nicotiana ‘Kim’s Gold’ at Hayefield.com Nicotiana ‘Kim’s Gold’
(‘Kim’s Gold’ flowering tobacco)
pink flowers from summer to frost; chartreuse foliage comes mostly (entirely?) true from seed; about 8 inches tall; partial shade for richest leaf and flower color; annual; from reader Kim M.
Nicotiana “Pink Mutabilis” at Hayefield.com Nicotiana [collected from “Pink Mutabilis”]
(flowering tobacco)
collected from 4-foot-tall, open-branching plant with pale pink flowers that age to purple; not sure what the seedlings will look like; full sun to partial shade; annual
Penstemon ‘Dark Towers’ at Hayefield.com Penstemon [collected from ‘Dark Towers’]
(beardtongue)
blooms in early summer; collected from cultivar with pink flowers and deep reddish purple leaves and stems; seedlings vary in foliage color but some are very dark; about 3 feet tall; full sun to partial shade; Zones 3 to 8
Pavonia missionum at Hayefield.com Pavonia missionum
(red mallow)
small, bright red, hibiscus-like flowers; about 3 feet tall; full sun to light shade; annual in most areas; from reader Rick R.
Pentapetes phoenicea at Hayefield.com Pentapetes phoenicea
(scarlet pentapetes)
small, bright red, hibiscus-like flowers; very slender foliage; 3 to 5 feet tall; full sun to light shade; annual; from reader Rick R.
Phuopsis stylosa at Hayefield.com Phuopsis stylosa
(
crosswort)
domes of pink flowers mostly in late spring to early summer, with scattered rebloom through the summer; foliage has a skunky odor; 6 to 8 inches tall; full sun to partial shade; Zones 5 to 9
Phytolacca americana ‘Silberstein’ at Hayefield.com Phytolacca americana ‘Silberstein’
(variegated pokeweed)
chains of white flowers that mature to black berries; cream-splashed foliage on reddish pink stems; seedlings are variegated but markings vary from plant to plant; 3 to 6 feet tall; full sun to partial shade; will self-sow; Zones 4 or 5 to 10
Plantago major ‘Atropurpurea’ at Hayefield.com Plantago major ‘Atropurpurea’
(purple-leaved plantain)
thin spikes of insignificant, greenish flowers; broad, reddish purple leaves; 6 to 12 inches tall; full sun to partial shade; self-sows freely; Zones 3 to 9
Platanthera lacera at Hayefield.com Platanthera lacera
(ragged fringed orchid)
spikes of lacy white flowers in July; 1 to 2 feet tall; U.S. native (provenance is Milford Township, Bucks County, PA); full sun to partial shade; Zones 2 to 9? ; dust-like seeds; very challenging to germinate
Ptelea trifoliata ‘Aurea’ at Hayefield.com Ptelea trifoliata ‘Aurea’
(golden wafer ash)
small deciduous tree with yellow-green flowers in summer; bright yellow leaves; 10 to 15 feet tall; comes true from seed; full sun to partial shade; Zones 4 to 9
Rosa achburensis and Hemerocallis Kwanzo Variegata early June 2005 Rosa achburensis little-known rose with single, white, lightly fragrant flowers in early summer, grayish green leaves in summer, and an abundance of orange-to-red hips in fall; to about 6 feet tall here; full sun to light shade; hardiness range unknown (is hardy here in Zone 6); my original plant came from Don Hackenberry of Appalachian Wildflower Nursery, who introduced this species to cultivation in North America
Staphylea trifolia seedpod at Hayefield.com Staphylea trifolia
(American bladdernut)
deciduous understory shrub or tree with white flowers in mid- to late spring; pale yellow fall color; inflated seedpods in fall; 10 to 15 feet tall; U.S. native (provenance Milford Township, Bucks County, PA); spreads by suckering; prefers moist soil; partial to full shade; Zones 3 to 8
Trachelium caeruleum ‘Black Knight’ at Hayefield.com Trachelium caeruleum ‘Black Knight’
(‘Black Knight’ throatwort)
lacy heads of deep purple flowers from mid- or late summer well into fall; purplish to near-black leaves; 18 to 30 inches tall; full sun to partial shade; annual; dust-like seed; needs patience
Zea mays 'Tall Tiger' at Hayefield.com Zea mays [collected from ‘Tall Tiger’]
(corn, from ‘Tall Tiger’)
collected from 4-foot-tall plants with white-striped leaves; some ears had orange kernels and some had yellow kernels; not sure what these seeds will produce; full sun; annual

Whew! Good for you to make it this far. I hope you had as much fun making your choices as I did gathering them. Now, here are the details on how this works.

How much do the seeds cost?

I’m not asking for any payment or anything in trade for these seeds. My goal in doing this is simply to get cool seeds into the grubby hands of other gardeners who will sow, grow, and appreciate them. I enjoy all of these plants, but some are extra special to me because they’ve come from readers and from other bloggers; I’ve indicated these pass-along seeds in the descriptions above. If you have luck with the seeds I send you, it would make me very happy if you’d be willing to collect seeds from the plants and then pass them on your gardening friends. Quite a few of them are very hard to find or not commercially available at this time, so they need to be shared as widely as possible.

I’d also greatly appreciate getting comments or emails about how the seeds worked out for you. Obviously, I’d like to hear that they did well, but it’s also very useful to know if you didn’t have luck with them, if the plants didn’t perform well for you, or if they turned out to be different from how I described them. I do my best to make sure that I collect the seeds from the right plants, clean them well, and label them properly, but mistakes are always possible. There’s also a possibility that the plants I collected from may have crossed with other species or selections here, so the offspring might be different that either you or I expect them to be. (By the way, I’ve given provenance information on the seeds that I collected from native plants growing wild in the fields and hedgerows around here, for those of you who care about such things.)

How about postage?

Covering all the postage costs got a bit overwhelming for me last year, so I’m asking that U.S. readers send me a SASE (self-addressed, stamped envelope – regular or business size). When I confirm your request, I’ll let you know how many stamps I think the SASE will need (just one for most seeds, but maybe two or three if you’re requesting bulky seeds, such as corn or beans, or if you’d like to me include extra padding).

For readers outside of the U.S., I will pay for the shipping, but I probably will have to limit the total to two or three packets to keep the cost down. It will be up to you to make sure that you are legally allowed to receive the seeds you request.

How do I send in my wish list?

Leave your list in a comment below, or send it to me in an email at nan [at] hayefield [dot] com. Make sure that you include a valid email address with your request.

Please list your seed requests in the order of preference (what you want most listed first). I encourage you to ask for whatever you’re interested in, up to around 10 things, so I have plenty of alternates if I can’t provide your first choices. Please be specific: do not request “some of everything” (I know it may be tempting), “whatever is easiest” (give the annuals or edibles a try), or “whatever is left” (judging by last year’s giveaway, there won’t be much).

I will fill requests in the order I receive them, so if there’s something you desperately want, I encourage you to get your list to me as quickly as possible. I sent out nearly 400 packets last year and have twice that amount ready to go this year, but I just never know what’s going to be popular.

I will respond to your email or comment within 48 hours to confirm that I received it, and to give you the mailing address for your SASE (or to ask for your mailing address, in the case of requests outside of the U.S.).

Please mail your SASE to me by December 1, 2013. I hope to send out all the seeds by mid-December, so you should have them by the end of the month.

Where can I find out how to germinate the seeds I get?

I’d hoped to include germination advice with my description of each of these seeds, but I simply ran out of time and energy, so I’ll leave it to you do some online research on the seeds you receive. Type the botanical and/or common name into your favorite search program along with “sow” or “germinate” and you should be able to get at least some basic tips. You can also find extensive germination databases and seed-starting information at Tom Clothier’s Garden Walk and Talk.

A while back, I wrote a post called The Science of Seed Germination, about  an alternative to sowing in pots or in the garden. In there, you can find links to the online versions of Dr. Norman Deno’s seed germination research: definitely worth checking out if you want to learn more about both the basics and intricacies of growing from seed.

Well, I think that’s it! Remember, the deadline for seed requests is 11:59 pm EST on November 25, 2013.

45 responses to this post.

  1. I so enjoy your blog (and stunning photos) and your books. Thank you for this generous offer for seeds. My wish list follows:

    Impatiens balfouri
    Arkansas bluestar
    Aquilegia ‘Heart of Gold’
    Asclepias speciosa
    Tuberous Jerusalem sage
    Rudbeckia maxima
    Veronia lettermannii
    Penstemon (collected from ‘Dark Towers’)
    Korean feather reed grass
    Frost grass

    Thanks, Katie – I’ve sent you an email with the address for the SASE.
    -Nan

  2. Posted by Sue Gilmour on November 15, 2013 at 6:25 am

    WOW, you have outdone yourself this time, must have taken quite a while. Even put pics beside the names and descriptions. I just found out a friend of mine who used to work in the nursery business has Dr Norman Deno’s soft covers! Exciting for me. I love to grow from seed, makes my long winters more bearable! Thanks again for your generosity. I would love to try Rudebeckia “Maxima”(I have the room!), Sanguisorba tenufolia “Alba”(would look great with Zebra grass)and Papaver “Laurens Grape”,gorgeous colour and I can sprinkle them now!! I’ll send you my address, thanks again. TTFN…Sue Gilmour

    Thank you, Sure; I may still have your address from last year but it would be helpful if you do send it along, just in case.
    -Nan

  3. Posted by Margaret Clancy on November 15, 2013 at 7:32 am

    Thank you so much for offering these seeds. I get so excited when I see a new blog from you, your pictures are amazing. Here is my wish list:

    Impatiens balfouri
    Ceratotheca triloba
    Zea mays ‘Old Gold’
    Ptelea trifoliata ‘Aurea’
    Schizachyrium scoparium
    Korean feather reed grass
    Penstemon [collected from ‘Dark Towers’]
    Stipa tenuissima (Mexican feather grass)
    Nicotiana ‘Kim’s Gold’
    Trachelium caeruleum ‘Black Knight’

    Thanks, Margaret; I’ll be in touch very soon.
    -Nan

  4. Posted by kathryn macdougald on November 15, 2013 at 8:31 am

    What a fabulous offering from one of my garden heroes. My list:

    Euphorbia marginata (Had it 20 years ago in a garden, I miss it.)
    Digitalis ferriugina
    Digitalis lutea
    Eringium giganteum
    Ruta graveoleus
    Clematis viorna
    Asphodeline lutea
    Phlomis tuberosa

    Will send my address when you ask for it. Thank you for doing this.

    My pleasure, Kathryn. I’ll be in touch with the address for the SASE.
    -Nan

  5. Posted by Julie on November 15, 2013 at 8:33 am

    Girl, your pictures and descriptions are so delicious I wanna stay up all night and forgo work for several days so I can compile my list…

    My “lust” ;-)

    1) Asphodeline lutea*
    2) Phuopsis stylosa* (you had me at the “skunky” odor- perfect addition to my “Stinky Socks” bed.
    3) Eryngium yuccifolium*
    4) Ptelea trifoliata ‘Aurea’*
    5) Erigeron karvinskianus
    6) Haloragis erecta ‘Wellington Bronze’
    7) Eryngium ‘Miss Willmott’s Ghost’
    8) Clematis sp. (versicolor?)
    9) Phlomis tuberosa
    10) Vernonia lettermanii
    11) alternative : Sangisorba tenufolia ‘Purpurea’

    Thank you, Nan!

    Very welcome, Julie. Watch your email!
    -Nan

  6. Thanks so much for sharing your love of these plants! I so enjoy your blog!
    *Papaver ‘Lauren’s Grape’
    *Nicotiana ‘Pink Mutablis’
    *Sanguisorba tenifolia ‘Purpurea’
    *Sanguisorba tenifolia ‘Alba’
    *Phlomis tuberosa
    Aquilegia ‘Heart of Gold’
    Ageratina ‘Jocius Variegate’
    Stachys officinalis ‘Alba’
    Zinnia ‘Soleado’
    Zinnia ‘Red Spider’

    It is so hard to choose!!!

    It was hard for me too – that’s how I ended up with so many! I’ll be in touch by email.
    -Nan

  7. Posted by Ellen on November 15, 2013 at 9:48 am

    Dear Nan

    As always, your post is another gift!

    I would love these seeds

    Gossypium herbascum nigra
    Filipendula ulmaria from aurea
    Zea mays old gold
    Okra hill country red
    Korean feather grass
    Polansia dodecandra dwarf cleome
    Asclepias speciousa
    Patrina scabiosifolia
    Ptelea triofoliata aurea
    Pretzel beans!

    I am digging through my seed box looking for something to share! Do you have any wooded shade. I have some arisaema triffolium native jack in the pulpit , also some heuchera villosa autumn bride. I also have asclepias silky gold from a commercial source. Let me know

    Thanks you so much for the offer.. And all of you wonderful sharing.

    Ellen

    I’ll be in touch soon, Ellen!
    -Nan

  8. Posted by Laura on November 15, 2013 at 10:24 am

    I’ve read several of your books and have followed your blog for a couple of years, it’s always a great inspiration for plant combinations. This is such a generous offer, thank you so much. My wish list would be

    papaver ‘Lauren’s Grape’
    patrinia scabiosifolia
    penstemon (from ‘Dark Towers’)

    I’m happy to send a SASE from Toronto, no reason you should have to bear the mailing cost. Looking forward to getting your address.

    I’m so happy to hear that you enjoy the books as well as the blog, Laura. I’ll email you today.
    -Nan

    Laura

  9. Posted by Jeffrey K. Funk on November 15, 2013 at 10:51 am

    Yeah! It’s seed starting / ordering time… my favorite time of the year… (i find starting seeds to be more intimate than just buying pots of things and plunging them in the ground…).

    My wish list:

    * Allium cernuum
    * Parthenium integrifolium
    * Sanguisorba tenuifolia ‘Alba’
    Veronicastrum virginicum
    Lespedeza capitata

    Thank you so much for the seeds and blog on how they grow in your garden!

    My favorite time too! I’ll be in touch, Jeffrey.
    -Nan

  10. Posted by Paula M. on November 15, 2013 at 11:24 am

    Hi Nan:

    What a wonderful selection! I have been putting together my list for awhile now. Couldn’t wait for today. I have been going through your book, “The Perennial Gardener’s Design Primer” for about the gazillionth time, planning my garden beds, trying to emulate your designs, with of course my touch. So to add to my plants:
    1. Petunia exserta
    2. Celosia ‘Mega Punk’
    3. Rudbeckia maxima
    4. Zinnia ‘Red Spider’
    5. Celosia ‘Cramers Amazon’
    6. Zinnia ‘Soleado’
    7. Phlomis tuberosa
    8. Trachelium coeruleum
    9. Tinantia erecta
    10. Vernonia lettermanni
    11. Asphodeline lutea
    Thank you for all you do to help us achieve our dream gardens!

    Paula M.

    I too have been looking forward to today for months, Paula! I’ll be in touch.
    -Nan

  11. Posted by paula molinary on November 15, 2013 at 12:35 pm

    Sent an email, but realized it might be easier to have all the requests in one place.
    your garden inspires and delights.

    wish list
    celosia cramers amazon
    celosia mega punk
    cosmos
    irish poet
    tagetes from villandry
    zinnia soleado
    rudbeckia maximus

    many thanks
    for your blog and any seeds you can share

    Email was just fine, Paula; thanks. Check your inbox for a message!
    -Nan

  12. What a gift you are offering! I have always enjoyed your blog, and want to thank you so much. I would love to have the following:
    Papaver Lauren’s/Feather grape
    Aquilegia heart of gold
    Penstemon Dark Towers
    Celosia Mega pink
    Clematis Viorna
    You are very generous. Namaste

    Just sent you an email, Karen – thanks!
    -Nan

  13. Posted by Jean Spangenberg on November 15, 2013 at 2:12 pm

    Nan, This is wonderful. I am so thrilled you are sharing your seeds with us. I have so enjoyed all of your garden’s beauty with each updated e-mail.

    Here is my wish list:

    *Persicaria orientalis ‘Shiro-gane Nishiki’
    (variegated kiss-me-over-the-garden-gate)

    *Spodiopogon sibiricus
    (frost grass)

    *Tagetes patula ‘Moldova’

    *Trachelium caeruleum ‘Black Knight’

    Phlomis tuberosa
    (tuberous Jerusalem sage)

    Platycodon grandiflorus ‘Axminster Streaked’

    Thunbergia alata ‘Susie Clear Orange’
    (‘Susie Clear Orange’

    Sanguisorba tenuifolia ‘Purpurea’

    Impatiens balfouri
    (poor man’s orchid)

    Polanisia dodecandra
    (dwarf cleome, red clammyweed)

    Mirabilis jalapa ‘Limelight’
    (‘Limelight’ four-o’clock)

    Thank you for this opportunity to have some of your garden in mine.
    Jean
    recipesaver2

    My pleasure, Jean – watch for an email (well, two, actually).
    -Nan

  14. Posted by Kimberly Thomas on November 15, 2013 at 4:49 pm

    Woman after my own heart! I love giving away seeds, divisions, & volunteers. Your blog and photos are fabulous and you are an inspirational gardener!
    Culver’s Root
    Round Headed Bush Clover
    Showy Milkweed
    Nodding Onions
    Euphorbia Marginata
    Hare’s Ear
    Prairie Dropseed
    Heart’s of Gold Columbine
    Ironweed
    Dwarf Cleome

    You are awesome! Thank You!
    -Kimberly

    It’s great fun finding wonderful new homes for all these seeds, Kimberly. I’ve sent you an email to confirm your requests.
    -Nan

  15. Hi Nan, I was very excited all day today because you mentioned that your seed sharing list would go online today. And wow, what a selection!
    This year was my first year with an allotment garden and having done a lot of seed starting – and being in the middle of seed cleaning right now – I know what an amount of work this can be. I appreciate your generous offer even more!

    This is my wish list in order of preference:

    1. Zinnia tenuifolia ‘Red Spider’ (Love the brick red colour)
    2. Brassica juncea ‘Ruby Streaks’ (Good looking edible? Need it!)
    3. Vigna unguiculata ‘Red Noodle’ (Beautiful!)
    4. Mirabilis jalapa ‘Limelight’ (I’m a huge fan of Mirabilis)
    5. Amsonia hubrichtii (Such great fall colour and still widely unknown in Germany)
    6. Platycodon grandiflorus‘Axminster Streaked’ (Love the buds and the fall colour)
    7. Penstemon digitalis (What a beautiful perennial)
    8. Porteranthus stipulatus (Is this in any case a synonym to Gillenia trifoliata?)
    9. Nicotiana ‘Kim’s Gold” (A good variety to start looking into Nicotianas I think)

    You know I life in Germany, so it’s totally okay if you have to restrict what you can send. Or would it be possible to refund the postage via paypal? I would love to do that!

    BTW, I’m asking again for the Amsonia because sadly the seeds from last year didn’t come through. I had a “blackbird attack”. The cheeky bird got most of the seed I had lovingly sowed in little pots outside. Some Patrinia made it (great fall foliage) and exactly one giant coneflower and one Mirabilis longiflora. The Tiger Cubs were wonderful too but didn’t set any seeds. I guess I must have sowed them too late in the season. Okay, that’s my little report on how things went this year.
    Looking forward to getting in touch with you.
    Britta

    I’m so happy for you and your new garden, Britta! I’ve sent you an email.
    -Nan

  16. Posted by Jacki Dougan on November 15, 2013 at 5:28 pm

    Nigella ‘Cramer’s Plum’…one I’ve had my eye on.
    -jacki

    Gotcha, Jacki – look for an email.
    -Nan

  17. This is fast becoming my favorite fall ritual!
    Emilia javanica ‘Irish Poet’
    Hibiscus trionum
    Verbascum ‘Gov. George Aiken’
    Lima Beans ‘Alma’s PA Dutch’
    Mustard ‘Ruby Streaks’

    Let me know if you’re interested in some ‘blue-podded’ garden peas, ‘Violetta’ fava beans, or ‘Stupice’ tomato seeds — I’ve got a very small veg garden and never use up all the seeds in a packet.

    thanks so much, Nan

    It’s my favorite thing too! I’m going to send you an email in a few minutes.
    -Nan

  18. Posted by DeborahB on November 15, 2013 at 6:35 pm

    Thanks so much for your continued generosity. I would love the following, listed in order of desire:

    Mustard ‘Ruby Streaks’
    Okra ‘Hill Country Red’ (saw similar stunning plant at Yew Dell in Louisville this year)
    Ptelea trifoliate ‘Aurea’
    Persicaria orientalis ‘Shiro-gane Nishiki’
    Celosia ‘Mega Punk’
    Vernonia lettermannii
    Phlomis tuberosa
    Digitalis ferriugina
    Eringium giganteum
    Red Noodle Bean

    Deborah

    Thanks, Deborah – I’ll be in touch.
    -Nan

  19. You really outdid yourself this year, I never expected a list THIS long! Also I’m glad you’re asking for postage, I’m sure everyone is more than happy to oblige.
    Fortunately you suggested ‘around 10′ selections, and I was able to cut down the list and not look too greedy, it could easily have been much longer!…. and it’s so interesting to see what others are asking for.
    my top ten:
    1. rosa achburensis
    2. ptelea trifoliate ‘aurea’
    3. verbascum ‘gov. George Aiken’
    4. tagetes paluta ‘Moldava’
    5. pentapetes Phoenicia
    6. zea mays ‘tigercub’
    7. phlomis tuberosa
    8. stachys officinalis ‘alba’
    9. bowallia Americana
    10. plantago major
    ps- you may notice some of ‘your’ seeds showing up on the HPS exchange this winter, you inspired me to join and now you’ve inspired me to give donating a try :)
    thanks!
    Frank

    Greetings, my fellow seed geek! I’ve sent you an email to confirm.
    -Nan

  20. Wow, what an amazing harvest of seed! I enjoy viewing your garden through your blog. I am a young gardener, but I am humbled by how giving gardeners are in general. No sooner do I admire someone’s plant than I have a cutting or some seeds to take home. :) I can’t wait to grow these and then pass them on!

    1. Amsonia hubrichtii
    (Arkansas bluestar)
    2. Phlomis tuberosa
    (tuberous Jerusalem sage)
    3. Schizachyrium scoparium
    (little bluestem)
    4. Pycnanthemum tenuifolium
    (narrow-leaved mountain mint)
    5. Penstemon digitalis
    (foxglove penstemon)
    6. Stipa tenuissima
    (Mexican feather grass)
    7. Allium cernuum
    (nodding onion)
    8. Eryngium giganteum
    (Miss Willmott’s ghost)
    9. Penstemon [collected from ‘Dark Towers’]
    (beardtongue)
    10. Lindera benzoin
    (spicebush)

    Thanks, Evee! I’ve sent you an email.
    -Nan

  21. Hi Nancy
    How generous of you to share the seeds of your babies! I can’t even imagine the amount of work and attention needed to prepare 800 bags of seeds! And then to post all pictures and names! And then to sort messages, e-mails and divide them!
    Please count me in for this list

    Platycodon grandiflorus‘Axminster Streaked’
    Stachys officinalis ‘Alba’
    Korean feather reed grass
    Nigella damascena
    Persicaria orientalis ‘Shiro-gane Nishiki’
    Amsonia hubrichtii
    Asclepias speciosa
    Tagetes patula ‘Moldova’
    Thunbergia alata ‘Susie Clear Orange’
    Vernonia lettermannii

    Daniela

    Look for an email from me, Daniela; thank you.
    -Nan

  22. Posted by Donna McKittrick on November 15, 2013 at 9:42 pm

    Wow! What a special person you are!
    Thank you for your generous offer of your seeds.
    I would like to bear the mailing costs to Victoria, B.C., Canada, please let me know how to arrange this.
    My wish list
    Cosmos sulphurous
    Amsonia hubrichtii
    Phlomis tuberosa
    Penstemon digitalis
    Partrinia scabiositolia
    Tagete spatula
    Ceratotheca triloba
    Clematis sp. veriscolor
    Digitalis Ferruginea
    Love your blog & just waiting for one of books to arrive.
    Thank you
    Donna

    No problem, Donna; I’ve sent you an email.
    -Nan

    • Posted by Donna McKittrick on November 16, 2013 at 8:46 pm

      Nan, left out one important letter in my e-mail

      Sorry, should of had my glasses on!

      No problem, Donna – except for the person who must have gotten the misaddressed email; I bet they are very confused right now. I’ve just resent the message to the corrected address; let me know if you don’t get it!
      -Nan

  23. Posted by Amanda Griffin on November 15, 2013 at 10:43 pm

    This is so exciting! I’ve had such fun looking up each of these plants and figuring out what I think will be happy with me.

    My list, in order of desire, is as follows:

    1) Plantago major ‘Atropurpurea’
    2) Pycnanthemum tenuifolium
    3) Sanguisorba tenuifolia ‘alba’
    4) Sanguisorba tenuifolia ‘purpurea’
    5) Parthenium integrifolium
    6) Impatiens Balfouri
    7) Patrinia scabiosifolia
    8) veronicastrum virginicum
    9) Asphodeline lutea
    10) Chrysanthemum coronarium

    Thank you for your generosity!!!

    I love that your top pick is the purple-leaved plantain! I will be in touch by email later today, Amanda.
    -Nan

  24. Posted by Sue Selis on November 15, 2013 at 11:33 pm

    Love your books, your blog and your generosity! My wish list is

    1) Nicotiana ‘Kim’s Gold’
    2) Filipendula ulmaria ‘Aurea’
    3) Mustard ‘Ruby Streaks’
    4) Mirablilis jalapa ‘Limelight’

    Thanks so much, Sue – watch for an email later today.
    -Nan

  25. Posted by Lisa on November 16, 2013 at 10:23 am

    I feel like a kid in a candy store! Thank you for all your hard work and generosity, your blog is such an inspiration to me. Here is my wish list:
    Filipendula ulmaria from aurea
    Nigella damascena ‘Cramers’ Plum’
    Amsonia hubrichtii (Arkansas bluestar)
    Digitalis grandiflora (yellow foxglove)
    Asclepias speciosa (showy milkweed)
    Sanguisorba tenuifolia ‘Purpurea’ (purple Japanese burnet)
    Persicaria orientalis ‘Shiro-gane Nishiki’ (variegated kiss-me-over-the-garden-gate)
    Celosia spicata ‘Flamingo Feather’
    Papaver ‘Lauren’s Grape’
    Symphyotrichum leave (smooth aster)
    Impatiens balfouri (poor man’s orchid)

    Thank you so much for sharing.
    Lisa

    So glad that you had fun, Lisa! I just sent you an email.
    -Nan

  26. Posted by Amanda on November 16, 2013 at 9:27 pm

    Celosia ‘Mega Punk’
    Celosia ‘Cramers’ Amazon’
    Mirabilis jalapa ‘Limelight’
    Sanguisorba tenuifolia ‘Purpurea’

    I’ve enjoyed this blog so much. Thank you for taking the time away from your garden to share it with us. I don’t think I’ve listed anything that’s not magenta or purple. That’s just how I roll. Thanks again!

    My pleasure, Amanda. Check your inbox for an email from me.
    -Nan

  27. Posted by Stacy Lynam on November 16, 2013 at 10:27 pm

    My friend Sue Selis (above) always sends me your blog and told me about this generous offer!
    Platycodon grandiflorus ‘Axminster Streaked’
    Amsonia hubrichtii
    Sanguisorba tenuifolia ‘Purpurea’
    Commelina communis f. aureostriata
    Can’t wait to see how they do! Thank you very much for sharing!!

    I encourage you to subscribe (it’s free); that way, you can get the new-post announcements directly. In the meantime, I’ve sent you an email. Thanks!
    -Nan

  28. I’ve been reading these posts forever, but this is my first chance to respond! thank you!

    Digitalis grandiflora
    Eryingium giganteum
    Phlomis tuberosa
    Veronicastrun virginicum
    Asphodeline lutea
    Arnsonia hubrichtii
    Erigeron karvinskianus
    Pensternon digitalis.

    Check your inbox for an email, Jennifer – thanks!
    -Nan

  29. Posted by LisaN on November 17, 2013 at 1:08 pm

    How wonderfully generous of you. I check in on your blog a couple times a month hoping for new pictures but I’ve never commented.

    Zinnia ‘Red Spider’
    Sanguisorba ‘Purpurea’
    Pentapetes phoenicea
    Nicotiana ‘Pink Mutabilis’
    Clematis, leather flower, either
    Okra ‘Bowling Red’
    Patrinia scabiosifolia
    Lauren’s grape poppy
    Tagetes ‘Moldova’
    Thunbergia ‘Clear Orange’

    Just sent you an email, Lisa – thanks!
    -Nan

  30. Posted by jo ann scholl on November 17, 2013 at 10:17 pm

    how much fun is this?
    here goes…
    digitalis ferruginea rusty foxglove
    rudbeckia maxima giant coneflower
    okra bowling red
    vigna unguiculata red noodle bean
    clematis viorna leather flower
    papaver laurens grape

    You’re most welcome, Jo Ann. Check you inbox for an email.
    -Nan

    thank you so much

    jo ann scholl

  31. Posted by Kathleen McCoy on November 17, 2013 at 11:46 pm

    Thank you, Nan. Your generosity inspires me.
    Thunbergia alata ‘Susie’s Clear Orange’
    Lindera benzoin
    Platycodon grandiflorus ‘Axminster streaked’
    Papaver ‘Lauren’s Gate’
    Pavonia missionum
    Digitalis ferruginea
    Tagetes patula ‘Moldova’
    Ipomoea nil ‘Cornell’
    Zinnia tenufolia

    Thank you, Kathleen – just sent you an email.
    -Nan

  32. Posted by Laura on November 18, 2013 at 4:54 am

    Thank you soo much for the extremely kind offer!

    I’d love to try any of the following

    Patrinia scabiosifolia
    Tagetes patula, any but especially ‘Moldova’
    Zinnia tenuifolia, any but especially ‘Red Spider’
    Cosmos sulphureus
    Garland chrysanthemom
    Mustard ‘Ruby streaks’
    Bupleurum rotundifolium

    Got your email, Laura; thank you.
    -Nan

  33. Your kindness is overwhelming, thank you. I have emailed my wish list to you, but I will list it here as well.
    Gossypium herbaceum ‘Nigra’ (black-leaved cotton)

    Talinum paniculatum ‘Kingwood Gold’
    (‘Kingwood Gold’ jewels-of-Opar)

    Parthenium integrifolium (wild quinine)

    Pycnanthemum tenuifolium (narrow-leaved mountain mint)

    Mirabilis jalapa ‘Limelight’ (‘Limelight’ four-o’clock)

    Erigeron karvinskianus (Mexican fleabane)

    Asclepias speciosa (showy milkweed)

    Eryngium giganteum (Miss Willmott’s ghost)

    Hibiscus trionum (New Zealand hibiscus)

    Abelmoschus moschatus ‘Mischief’ (‘Mischief’ musk mallow)

    Alternate choice if one of above is not available.
    Okra ‘Bowling Red’ (Abelmoschus esculentus ‘Bowling Red’)

    Thank you and may you enjoy peace.

    I’ve sent you an email, Mary – thank you.
    -Nan

  34. Posted by Sarah Montero on November 18, 2013 at 10:03 pm

    Nan, you are awesome! I love your blog and the interesting combinations you come up with. Your photos make me pine for sun and good drainage. I’d love to try some of your “partial shade” seeds:
    browallia
    Filipendula ulmaria
    impatiens balfouri
    clematis sp.

    Thanks!
    Sarah

    My pleasure, Sarah. Check your inbox for a message from me.
    -Nan

  35. Posted by Christine Bliss on November 19, 2013 at 9:37 am

    This is so nice of you! I really appreciate your generosity. I would love to grow:
    Papaver ‘Lauren’s Grape’
    (‘Lauren’s Grape’ poppy
    Talinum paniculatum ‘Kingwood Gold’
    (‘Kingwood Gold’ jewels-of-Opar)
    Mirabilis jalapa ‘Limelight’
    (‘Limelight’ four-o’clock
    Browallia americana
    (amethyst flower)
    Hibiscus trionum
    (New Zealand hibiscus
    Thank you!

    Just sent you an email, Christine.
    -Nan

  36. Posted by Jen on November 19, 2013 at 9:57 am

    Nan thank you so much for the kind offer. Nothing to make spring seem like it is around the corner then planing on where to plant all of these luscious plants! (my two favorites at the top)
    My list:
    ***Papaver Lauren’s grape***
    ***Platycodon grandiflorus Axminster Streaked***
    **Mirabilis jalapa limelight
    **Pholomis tueberosa
    Erigen Karvinskinus
    Ruta graveolers Variegata
    Thunbergia alta Susie
    Browallia Americana
    Amsonia hubrichtii
    Eupatorium hyssopifolium

    Thank you!
    Jen

    Gotcha, Jen. I just sent an email to your home address (the one you left here).
    -Nan

  37. Posted by Christin K. on November 19, 2013 at 1:28 pm

    So lovely of you to do this Nan! The seeds I got from you awhile back did amazingly…I especially loved ‘Tiger’s Cub’ Corn, though I didn’t get any seed from it to save for next year ;-( My wish list would be:

    Ruta graveolens Variegata (looking everywhere for this!!)
    Erigeron karvinskianus
    Zea mays Tiger Cub
    Zea mays Old Gold
    Vernonia lettermannii
    Emilia ‘Irish Poet’
    Commelina aureostriata
    Many thanks!
    CMK

    Very welcome, Christin – I just sent you an email.
    -Nan

  38. No requests, just stopped by to say hi. You are so nice to do this and people really appreciate it judging by the response. Happy fall.

    Hi there, Carolyn! Thanks so much for visiting. I wish you and your family a wonderful Thanksgiving!
    -Nan

  39. Posted by Faith Grace on November 22, 2013 at 9:37 pm

    Thanks for the gracious offer! I am a new reader and have fallen in love with Hayefield. I have already shared your site with a friend at work who loves gardening as much as I do. It would be awesome to have part of Hayefield growing in my own yard!

    Amaranthus ‘Hopi Red Dye’
    Amsonia hubrichtii
    Browallia Americana
    Zinna tenuifolia ‘Red Spider’
    Pentsemon ‘Dark Towers’
    Celosia ‘Mega Punk’
    Zinnia haageana ‘Soleado’
    Talinum paniculatum
    Aquilegia ‘Heart of gold’
    Platycodon Grandiflorus

    Thank you so much!

    You’re most welcome, Faith. I just sent you an email.
    -Nan

  40. Dear Nan,
    Thank you for your generosity! This is a magnificient undertaking. I learn so much everytime I read your posts.
    Thanks again,
    Jan
    Here is my wish list:
    1.Eryngium giganteum(Miss Willmott’s ghost)
    2.Allium cernuum(nodding onion)
    3.Digitalis grandiflora(yellow foxglove)
    4.Pavonia missionum(red mallow)
    5.Platycodon grandiflorus ‘Axminster Streaked’(‘Axminster Streaked’ balloon flower)
    6.Polanisia dodecandra(dwarf cleome, red clammyweed)
    7.Persicaria orientalis ‘Shiro-gane Nishiki’(variegated kiss-me-over-the-garden-gate)
    8.Celosia spicata ‘Flamingo Feather’(‘Flamingo Feather’ celosia)

    I just sent you an email, Janet.
    -Nan

  41. Posted by Nora Sirbaugh on November 24, 2013 at 8:30 am

    Well, better late than never! Because work is winding up for the end of term, this morning’s my first chance to weigh in! So if you have any left, here’s my wish list. And many thanks, Nan! This is only my second year of actually consciously gathering and sowing seeds. While I have a number of delightful (and not so much so) self sowers, I have seldom started plants from seed. When I deliberately did these past two years, it gave me an unbelievable rush of delight! So from small victories onward; :-)
    Nora
    Persicaria orientalis ‘Shiro-gane Nishiki’
    Eryngium giganteum (Miss Willmott’s Ghost)
    Papaver ‘Lauren’s Grape’
    Ipomoea nil ‘Cornell’
    Phlomis tuberosa
    Stachys officinalis ‘alba’

    I just sent you an email, Nora.
    -Nan

  42. Posted by Mark Izenson on November 24, 2013 at 6:06 pm

    Nan, thank you for the kind offer. I enjoy your blog and bought your book on perennial care through Amazon. I believe you have my email address, as I subscribe to your email service. My wish list follows:

    1. Golden Lace
    2. Giant Coneflower
    3 Narrow-Leaved Ironweed
    4. Showy Milkweed
    5.Indian Physic
    6. Variegated Rue
    7. Smooth Aster
    8. Narrow-Leaved Ironweed
    9. Frost Grass
    10. Lesser Snakeroot

    Thank you again,
    Mark Izenson
    Atlanta, Georgia

    Good to hear from you, Mark. Check your inbox for an email from me.
    -Nan

  43. Posted by Julie on November 26, 2013 at 7:52 am

    Woo Hoo–got my seeds today–thank you, Nan!
    Your largesse will be multiplied as I’m sharing the bounty with folks in my “hood”.

    Cool, Julie – thanks for letting me know!
    -Nan

  44. Posted by Kay on December 26, 2013 at 8:30 pm

    WOW! I just found your website! The pictures are great. I’m sure I am much too late for seeds this year, but if you have any left over, my wishlist for seeds would be: Nicotiana – Pink Mutabilis and Papavar – Lauren’s Grape. I have the tall Nicotiana, Only the Lonely and love it, so I’m sure I would love the Pink Mutabilis

    Very generous of you to share your seeds with so many.
    Thanks,
    Kay

    Welcome, Kay, and thanks for reading. Unfortunately, the poppy and nicotiana seeds ran out even before the end of the give-away. So sorry to disappoint you.
    -Nan

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