A Garden in a Library

Garden in a Library at Hayefield.com

If you’re a fan of garden-related quotes, you may have already run across this gem from Roman statesman Marcus Tullius Cicero: “Si hortum in bibliotheca habes, nihil deerit,” usually translated as “If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.” That version is spot-on for many of us who enjoy books and plants with equal passion. The more literal translation of hortum in bibliotheca—a garden in a library—lends itself to some very interesting interpretations, including the one that has captured my interest recently: the concept of a “seed library.” Continue reading

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day – July 2014

'Monte Negro' Asiatic lily (Lilium) with golden meadowsweet (Filipendula ulmaria 'Aurea') [July 1, 2014] at Hayefield.com

‘Monte Negro’ Asiatic lily (Lilium) with golden meadowsweet (Filipendula ulmaria ‘Aurea’) [July 1, 2014]

There’s been lots going on in the garden over the past few weeks, and I have plenty of flower and foliage pictures to share with you. We’re in the midst of a stormy spell right now, though, so in the interest of getting this post done before the power goes out, it’ll just be a gallery of the highlights with captions under each one. (At least, they should be there; I apologize in advance if any of the formatting is a bit wonky.) I hope you enjoy the quick tour!
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Foliage Follow-Up

Hosta 'Sun Power' with Imperata cylindrica 'Rubra', Persicaria affine, Carex plantaginea, Acer palmatum, and Rosa glauca at Hayefield.com

Those of you who follow Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day, hosted by Carol at May Dreams Gardens on the 15th of each month, probably also know about Foliage Follow-Up, hosted by Pam at Digging on the following day. I can barely get my Bloom Day posts done in time, so I don’t usually get to participate in Foliage Follow-Up on the scheduled day, but I figured I’d bend the rules a bit to have an excuse for showing off some leafy highlights from this season so far.

Let’s start with the most distinctive foliage color in the spring-to-early-summer garden: the yellows and yellow-greens…

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Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day – June 2014

Side Garden mid-June 2014 at Hayefield.com

On the whole, the weather over the last month has been just lovely for gardening here in southeastern Pennsylvania: not too hot, and not too humid, either. The fairly regular rains have been a blessing, as well—I haven’t had to water the garden once since I finished planting about three weeks ago—except for the deluge we got two days ago. Continue reading

On Gardens Left Behind

Side Garden with Arkansas bluestar (Amsonia hubrichtii), 'Axminster Gold' comfrey (Symphytum x uplandicum), red campion (Silene dioica), and 'Latifolia Maculata' boxwood (Buxus sempervirens) [late May 2014] at Hayefield.com

Side Garden at Hayefield with Arkansas bluestar (Amsonia hubrichtii), ‘Axminster Gold’ comfrey (Symphytum x uplandicum), red campion (Silene dioica), and ‘Latifolia Maculata’ boxwood (Buxus sempervirens) – late May 2014

Hearing that several of you are in the process of leaving your current gardens and starting over in new places has gotten me thinking about the fate of gardens that are left behind, either by choice or necessity.

What happens to a garden in the absence of its creator depends a good deal on the person or people who are left with its care. If they are non-gardeners—and yes, though it’s hard to remember, there are lots of people out there for whom gardening is not a consuming passion—they may think of buying the house, rather than the landscape, with the idea of turning the garden back to grass as soon as possible.

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Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day – May 2014

Spiraea x vanhouttei 'Pink Ice' at Hayefield.com

Thank goodness for Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day! If it weren’t for the need to occasionally stop and take pictures, I doubt I’d have taken the time to really notice what’s going on in the garden over the past month. Things are looking much tidier now, but it’s taken a lot of weeding and clipping and pruning to get them that way. (By the way, you can see larger, clearer versions of the images by clicking on them.)

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Picture This – In the Frame

Courtyard arbor with Fallopia 'Lemon Lace' framing Eutrochium maculatum, Amsonia hubrichtii, Sedum rupestre 'Angelina', and Pennisetum orientale 'Karley Rose' at Hayefield.com

When you’re photographing plants and gardens, it’s natural to focus your attention on what’s in the center of the picture. Taking a few seconds to consider the “frame”—the edges of the image—before you shoot can help to enhance the entire photograph.

One thing to think about is the orientation of the image: whether you hold the camera in its normal position to take a photo that’s a horizontal rectangle or turn it 90 degrees to shoot a vertical one. Broad garden shots, large drifts, and low, spreading plants tend to lend themselves to horizontals…

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